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Do the current UK political parties actually speak for the people of the UK anymore? Watch

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    I have become increasing disillusioned by UK politics as none of the parties seem to speak for me any more. The conservatives seemed determined to cut and privatise until even the houses of parliament are up for sale, Labour appears to have no clear plan and just to want to fall back on old habits of borrowing more money. The Lib Dems are just spineless and have no policies from what I can see. And Finally UKIPs only plan is to leave the EU and pray by the sounds of it.
    What do you think?
    and do you think there is space for another party?
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    (Original post by The Country Lad)
    I have become increasing disillusioned by UK politics as none of the parties seem to speak for me any more. The conservatives seemed determined to cut and privatise until even the houses of parliament are up for sale, Labour appears to have no clear plan and just to want to fall back on old habits of borrowing more money. The Lib Dems are just spineless and have no policies from what I can see. And Finally UKIPs only plan is to leave the EU and pray by the sounds of it.
    What do you think?
    and do you think there is space for another party?
    For vocal minority groupings on the fringes of left and right, I understand that people may feel disillusioned. That's why political parties like the SNP and UKIP are gaining traction. It's not just a UK phenomena. Greece has communists and nazis represented in its parliament.

    As the economy rebounds, things will normalise.
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    You probably know very little about what the parties policies are.

    What are the Conservatives' privatisation plans?

    What are Labour's borrowing plans?

    Have you even looked at the Lib Dems policies or are you just saying 'they have no policies from what I can see'


    You are confusing 'I don't know what the parties' policies are' with 'they have no policies'
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    I never professed to knowing anything about them at all. My point is more DO YOU believe the main political parties speak for the people currently and if so why?

    As for my sweeping generalisations I am only saying it as I see it at this point in time.

    And its more confusing having "no policies" with vanishing from the limelight having lost the confidence they had in the run up to last elections.
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    Political parties have never slavishly followed public opinion - and a damn good thing too.

    Abolishing the death penalty was unpopular at the time, and has become more popular in recent decades; same-sex civil partnerships were very much opposed, yet gained a political consensus in support of them; Tony Blair's NHS reforms were hated by many, but have proven themselves over time.

    There are plenty who have called for small-c conservatism when the world is changing and far-reaching decisions are being made. That is why politicians are leaders, not delegates: it is their job to present policies, to make a case for them and often to implement them without any great support from the public.
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    That is very true but it is how people vote... which party is going to do the best for me and do I trust them to run a country

    Currently we have very "rooted" parties to choose from, to the left labour near the middle left the liberal democrats and at varying degrees to right of the centre, the conservatives and UKIP occupying a far right position.

    But say for an instance a new party emerged lets call it BIP (the British Isles Party), and a number of its policies were for instance Leaving the EU, renationalising the railways and the Royal Mail, removing tuition fees, increasing military spending.... So a party with a mixture of very right and very left and so more central policies (not those exact policies) would you be more inclined to vote for that kind of party or one of the big three + UKIP?
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    The main three parties are the exact same. They have the same leaders who went to private schools followed by Oxbridge and straight into politics. And they have the same policies.

    Vote UKIP if you want real change
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    (Original post by anonwinner)
    The main three parties are the exact same. They have the same leaders who went to private schools followed by Oxbridge and straight into politics. And they have the same policies.

    Vote UKIP if you want real change
    Dulwich and, even more so, Chouse have produced a fair few politicians down the years....

    OP, well 60 odd per cent of us voted for one of the parties, so yes.
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    (Original post by anonwinner)
    The main three parties are the exact same. They have the same leaders who went to private schools followed by Oxbridge and straight into politics. And they have the same policies.

    Vote UKIP if you want real change
    Good God, imagine learning about politics and philosophy at the best universities in the world, then going into a politics-linked career. It's almost like the job might require some skill and expertise.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Good God, imagine learning about politics and philosophy at the best universities in the world, then going into a politics-linked career. It's almost like the job might require some skill and expertise.
    People who do this are called career-politicians.

    I'd rather have someone as our PM who has had real jobs and experienced real daily struggles.

    If your plan is to go to university then immediately join a Party and attempt to become an MP/get as high up as possible then you're not doing it for the right reasons.

    People should become politicians because they have a desire for change or reform, not because they want a job as a politician.
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    (Original post by anonwinner)
    People who do this are called career-politicians.

    I'd rather have someone as our PM who has had real jobs
    Why isn't politics a "real" job? What other jobs do you think aren't "real"?

    and experienced real daily struggles.
    Like what? Growing up the child of immigrants (as with Ed Miliband)? Or maybe having a heavily disabled child (like David Cameron)? Stuff like that? Or do you not accept that people who have jobs in politics have anything other than a lovely time of it?

    If your plan is to go to university then immediately join a Party and attempt to become an MP/get as high up as possible then you're not doing it for the right reasons.

    People should become politicians because they have a desire for change or reform, not because they want a job as a politician.
    Nope. Any pub bore can pontificate about half-baked ideas and why he thinks everything is going to hell in a handcart. That's not a skill, and it's not worth the taxpayer paying good money for.

    Public policy is a completely different issue altogether: it is a calculation of utility, being able to effectively balance competing interests, being able to realistically measure and consider risk. Being able to find a path between principle and objective evidence.

    If we were run by a bunch of passionate amateurs, this country would be in a far worse state than it is.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Why isn't politics a "real" job? What other jobs do you think aren't "real"?



    Like what? Growing up the child of immigrants (as with Ed Miliband)? Or maybe having a heavily disabled child (like David Cameron)? Stuff like that? Or do you not accept that people who have jobs in politics have anything other than a lovely time of it?



    Nope. Any pub bore can pontificate about half-baked ideas and why he thinks everything is going to hell in a handcart. That's not a skill, and it's not worth the taxpayer paying good money for.

    Public policy is a completely different issue altogether: it is a calculation of utility, being able to effectively balance competing interests, being able to realistically measure and consider risk. Being able to find a path between principle and objective evidence.

    If we were run by a bunch of passionate amateurs, this country would be in a far worse state than it is.
    I didn't say 'politics isn't a real job' - because that doesn't make sense - I said being a politician isn't a real job. This only applies to people who haven't had experience in any other jobs. For example, if you leave university and run your own business for 20 years and then decide to become a politician because you think small businesses are treated unfairly, then this is a legitimate reason to do so. However, if your plan since you were 16 years old was to become a politician and become PM and you join a Party straight out of Oxbridge then you're a career-politician. Pretty simple.

    And yes, Ed Miliband must have had such a difficult childhood as the son of two wealthy champagne-socialists, poor him
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    (Original post by anonwinner)
    I didn't say 'politics isn't a real job' - because that doesn't make sense - I said being a politician isn't a real job. This only applies to people who haven't had experience in any other jobs. For example, if you leave university and run your own business for 20 years and then decide to become a politician because you think small businesses are treated unfairly, then this is a legitimate reason to do so. However, if your plan since you were 16 years old was to become a politician and become PM and you join a Party straight out of Oxbridge then you're a career-politician. Pretty simple.
    I'm sorry, I'm not going to let that fly at all. You did say politics wasn't a real job: that's exactly what you said in stating that you didn't want a Prime Minister who'd worked in politics but preferred someone "who has had real jobs". There is no way the words you used could possibly have conveyed anything else.

    I see you haven't addressed any of the criticisms of what I consider your quite ludicrously narrow-minded views. Public policy, politics, public affairs and so forth are all, firstly, real jobs - many with longer hours and far more stress than most. Secondly, they better prepare you for a political career than being some ageing prat with a grievance about his particular business. In politics, you're expected to form views based on evidence and objective fact, not anecdote and "personal experience".
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    Political parties aren't meant to speak for people, they are means for some people to force their idea's upon other people.
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    (Original post by anonwinner)
    I said being a politician isn't a real job.
    Why isn't it?
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    I'd trust Russell Brand as PM much more than the others up there now.
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    (Original post by anonwinner)
    The main three parties are the exact same. They have the same leaders who went to private schools followed by Oxbridge and straight into politics. And they have the same policies.

    Vote UKIP if you want real change
    Yep, down the Oxbridge graduates who don't know a thing! Bring on the public school educated city Banker instead!!
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    Well, once we're out of the EU, UK politics should be much more flexible. If UKIP to get in, we will leave the EU and then UKIP will be out next term.
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    (Original post by The Country Lad)
    Labour appears to have no clear plan and just to want to fall back on old habits of borrowing more money
    How is that Labour's plan? It sounds like you've accepted the lazy assessment of the right-wing press, rather than actually bothered to inquire yourself

    What do you know of Labour's policy?
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    (Original post by TheCynicalChild)
    I'd trust Russell Brand as PM much more than the others up there now.
    I would trust Peter Hitchens far more than Russell Brand who is an idealistic uneducated moron.

    Through to be honest I don't trust anyone to be PM, so I want to constrain the position as much as possible.
 
 
 
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