Join TSR now and get answers to all your questions about uniSign up now
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I first wanted to become a gastroenterologist because I wanted a fullfilling job and when I first started learning about the digestive system and started looking at ulcers and other stuff in my spare time I was fascinated in digestive system. It become my ultimite fascination but lets face it my passion will not get me all a in gcse and a level and my hard work is wrothless I will need 10 years studying I am not as intelligent as I want to be I study so hard I feel like the pressure is making me unhappy as I feel like this is just a dream which will never be achieved I feel hopeless.

    I feel like I have so much on my shoulders i don't want to disappoint myself and not get into the university I want to go to. Also 10 years is a lot i would be willing to do baby sitting jobs however lets face it my mum cannot afford to pay my university or support me financially I would be willing to work doing babysitting but its not enough I want to have a job I love coming to but I don't think i am intelligent and things like that do not happen to people like me they only happen to people who have the money to study or who are intelligent to get a schoolar ship I don't think I can do this.

    Help me please I just cannot do this I want a fullfilling job which I love but I don't see how it is possible I love biology chemistry but I am bad at mathematics physics not my strongest point I am just a stupid girl who has dreams that don't come true my dreams are too sureal and I am stupid believeing that I will ever get an A in all my subjects even though I am predicted A in everything.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Just work as hard as you can and don't give up. My teachers were very discouraging towards me, but I proved them wrong.

    As far as finances go, you do not have to pay up front. A medical degree is 5 years long, for the first 4 years you get a student tuition fee loan and a maintenance loan for living costs from the government; you do not start paying this back until you are earning. In the final year you get an NHS bursary which pays for your tuition and part of your maintenance; you do not have to pay this back. After the degree you are still training, but are paid during this time, with the amount you are paid rising each year.

    You only need to be good at biology and chemistry, these are the only A-level subjects that are actually required. You need to try and do as well as you can in GCSE maths and physics, but then you can drop them, so don't worry too much about that.

    It sounds like you are doubting yourself a lot. It can be difficult sometimes to believe in yourself, but clearly your teachers think you are smart if they are predicting you all As for GCSE, so don't give up on your dream! Remember that there are also numerous other healthcare professions which are also fulfilling (nursing, dietetics, nutrition, radiography etc) if you find in the end that you don't quite get the grades for medicine, but don't give up yet, you still have time to put the work in to do your best.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Why are you talking about 10 years? A medical degree is 5 years long which is the same as my son's Scottish MEng degree and only a year or 2 longer than other degrees and at least with a medical degree you are very likely to have a well paid job at the end unlike doing a nonvocational subject.
    If you want to be a doctor work hard and go for it.
    If your GCSE results aren't great have a rethink and look at other jobs involving the gut. There is an awful lot of peering up people's bottoms and sticking your finger in anuses as a gastroenterologist though. Proton pump inhibitor drugs are so good that stomach ulcers are treated in general practice. If the research side of gastroenterology interests you then there are probably better degrees than medicine to do.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Take a view. Five or six years for MB. Then F1 and F 2 years. Followed by another six or seven years of training with further postgraduate exams (MRCP); research and training. This adds up to about 15years from the end of A levels. You are paid from F1 onwards. At your stage get as best GCSEs that you can. Then take care in A level selection, chemistry and biology are fine plus one other serious subject. Get some work experience to see what life as a hospital physician in gastroenterology is like. All hospitals will have a work experience officer to contact for young people interested in health professions.

    Don't be put off but there are far more well qualified applicants than places to read medicine. It can be an interesting varied career but be aware morale is pretty low in uk medicine, both hospital and GP at present.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Medicine is difficult, becoming a gastroenterologist even more so, if you can't handle the academics maybe it isn't actually the best option.

    This is obviously harsh, but it may also be saving you from a wrong decision.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you I will consider doing some research if there is some experience I could get in a hospital over the holidays or something.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Liking the gut is not a sufficient reason to want to be a gastroenterologist. You need to consider what the job actually involves ie do some reading and get work experience.

    (Original post by brutuswood)
    All hospitals will have a work experience officer to contact for young people interested in health professions.
    I wish. Unfortunately many hospitals do not and the only way to get experience is 'contacts'.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I guess you are right. St Peter's Chertsey, Surrey and a variety of others in the South East certainly do. School students interested in health careers simply contact the work experience officer who is (if I recall correctly) located in the post graduate centre. Clearly one should never say ''all''! However, there is a general move to avoid a situation where work experience is dependent on contacts in the NHS. Potential medical students can get equally valid experience in other settings. The fundamental problem is that so many are ill advised on subject choice at school and perhaps don't realise that they do have to be in the top academic cohort to succeed. Speaking as an old buffer (Cambridge graduate mid eighties) working in legal medicine now. I have had a great career but wouldn't really recommend to the young now.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Keep working towards your dream. As well medicine there are other options to study this type of thing like anatomy and physiology.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Maria1812)
    I first wanted to become a gastroenterologist because I wanted a fullfilling job and when I first started learning about the digestive system and started looking at ulcers and other stuff in my spare time I was fascinated in digestive system. It become my ultimite fascination but lets face it my passion will not get me all a in gcse and a level and my hard work is wrothless I will need 10 years studying I am not as intelligent as I want to be I study so hard I feel like the pressure is making me unhappy as I feel like this is just a dream which will never be achieved I feel hopeless.

    I feel like I have so much on my shoulders i don't want to disappoint myself and not get into the university I want to go to. Also 10 years is a lot i would be willing to do baby sitting jobs however lets face it my mum cannot afford to pay my university or support me financially I would be willing to work doing babysitting but its not enough I want to have a job I love coming to but I don't think i am intelligent and things like that do not happen to people like me they only happen to people who have the money to study or who are intelligent to get a schoolar ship I don't think I can do this.

    Help me please I just cannot do this I want a fullfilling job which I love but I don't see how it is possible I love biology chemistry but I am bad at mathematics physics not my strongest point I am just a stupid girl who has dreams that don't come true my dreams are too sureal and I am stupid believeing that I will ever get an A in all my subjects even though I am predicted A in everything.
    Winners are too busy to be sad,
    too positive to be doubtful,
    too optimistic to be fearful,
    and too determined to be defeated.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Your goal of gastroenterologist is achievable, but tough. You are talking about 5 years med school, 2 years foundation, 2 years core medical (those will be 4 fairly gruelling years) then entering a particularly demanding, competitive medical specialty where you will have to play the daunting/dreaded role of the medreg before reaching consultant, where in most centres you will still be expected to do frequent on calls.

    Given the risks/potential sacrifices involved, and not knowing how your priorities may change in future, my advice is always to look at medicine/surgery as a whole (possibly with the exception of dedicated psychiatrists or GPs) and not one particular specialty when you are only at med school applicant stage. In short, if you don't think you'd be happy in another specialty (in particular GP), reconsider whether going for gastro is worth it. If you don't have enough info to weigh it up, find out more! Good luck

    EDIT: Money's not as bigger issue as you think. In fact the poorer your mum is the better off you are, providing you don't literally have to support her. You won't be rich or anything for some time (and have lots of debt) but it's completely doable.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I would hate to be a gp as gp do not deal with specific things I would prefer to focous on one part of body specificly. I would prefer to work for private cleaning rather then nhs but i think it is not as bad. Also the digestive system is very interesting so is the brain but maybe if i enter med school I will find that there our other fields in medicine then gastrenterology that I will like pediatrician is another possible option. I also like the brain but I am not sure about it I do not want to be a cardiologist as i heard the hospital can call you anytime and the heart is not an organ i am particularly interested in.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Maria1812)
    I would hate to be a gp as gp do not deal with specific things I would prefer to focous on one part of body specificly. I would prefer to work for private cleaning rather then nhs but i think it is not as bad. Also the digestive system is very interesting so is the brain but maybe if i enter med school I will find that there our other fields in medicine then gastrenterology that I will like pediatrician is another possible option. I also like the brain but I am not sure about it I do not want to be a cardiologist as i heard the hospital can call you anytime and the heart is not an organ i am particularly interested in.
    I would perhaps focus on your a-levels and forming a good application to medschool before concerning yourself with these choices.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Maria1812)
    I would hate to be a gp as gp do not deal with specific things I would prefer to focous on one part of body specificly. I would prefer to work for private cleaning rather then nhs but i think it is not as bad. Also the digestive system is very interesting so is the brain but maybe if i enter med school I will find that there our other fields in medicine then gastrenterology that I will like pediatrician is another possible option. I also like the brain but I am not sure about it I do not want to be a cardiologist as i heard the hospital can call you anytime and the heart is not an organ i am particularly interested in.
    Right now you need to read up on NHS Choices about what a doctor actually is. Chances are you will be working for the NHS, especially in the beginning. You seem to be ruling out a lot of options, and a medical degree allows you to explore what areas of medicine you like. Try not to be biased at this point in time (favourite organs), and just do some research into the subject. Also chances are, as a doctor you will be on call (contacted at anytime) for a large portion of your career! Good luck with your GCSEs, and try not to limit what you think you can/can't do
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I do think you have formed a completely unrealistic view about medical careers. As has been suggested above look at NHS choices. In the UK you will work in the NHS;even if you reached consultant then your main work would be likely to be NHS. About half of young doctors train for GP.

    Concentrate on GCSE and A levels....look at what is academically required and see if it is likely you will reach an appropriate level . Bear in mind there are far more very academic applicants than places. From what you have written so far you are likely to have difficulty with university interview to read medicine. (Entrenched and unrealistic ideas about future career)
 
 
 
Poll
If you won £30,000, which of these would you spend it on?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.