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    Hello. Please can you state the steps I'd need to take, starting from GCSE level to working in the US as a doctor.

    I'd like to gain my M.D in the UK, and complete the first two steps of my USMLE here in the UK too, I'd only move to the US for the last two steps of the USMLE. How can I practice medicine in the US? Please can you detail the steps thoroughly. THANKYOU !!
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    For a start, the medical degree in the UK is not an MD, you get an MB BS or MB ChB. The pathway for medical training in the UK is completely different from that in the US, they are not interchangeable and you cannot switch from one to the other in the middle. USMLE does not exist in the UK.

    To work in the US as a doctor you would need to take one of these options:
    1) Get your medical degree in the US (in the US medicine is a graduate degree so you would first need to get a bachelors degree/college degree) - this is the easiest way of getting into training in the US.

    2) Complete a medical degree in the UK then go straight into training in the US:
    Do the USMLE exams, then electives in the US. Then you can apply for ECFMG certification. Then you can apply for residency, you will need a personal statement and references from US doctors.

    3) Complete postgraduate training in the UK - FY, then specialist training, then do USMLEs, get ECFMG etc.

    You need to do some research, as the process is quite complicated.
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    (Original post by theresheglows)
    For a start, the medical degree in the UK is not an MD, you get an MB BS or MB ChB. The pathway for medical training in the UK is completely different from that in the US, they are not interchangeable and you cannot switch from one to the other in the middle. USMLE does not exist in the UK.

    To work in the US as a doctor you would need to take one of these options:
    1) Get your medical degree in the US (in the US medicine is a graduate degree so you would first need to get a bachelors degree/college degree) - this is the easiest way of getting into training in the US.

    2) Complete a medical degree in the UK then go straight into training in the US:
    Do the USMLE exams, then electives in the US. Then you can apply for ECFMG certification. Then you can apply for residency, you will need a personal statement and references from US doctors.

    3) Complete postgraduate training in the UK - FY, then specialist training, then do USMLEs, get ECFMG etc.

    You need to do some research, as the process is quite complicated.
    2 is the easiest way of getting into training in the US. Getting into US medical school as a non-US citizen is exceedingly difficult not to mention expensive. It can be a pretty expensive failure as well. Only about 150 internationals get into medical school across the US every year and to even make an attempt you need to put down a lot of money for a 4 year undergraduate degree. I don't even think 3 is an option, the US does not recognized British specialty training they would make you do residency all over again.
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    (Original post by Okorange)
    I don't even think 3 is an option, the US does not recognized British specialty training they would make you do residency all over again.
    If you have done UK specialty training you can apply for partial exemption from the residency programme requirement and take USMLE Step 3 sooner.

    Edit:
    (Original post by Okorange)
    2 is the easiest way of getting into training in the US
    debatable. getting into training with a UK degree isn't much easier if at all, although it might be less expensive and a shorter process for getting the degree. they aren't keen on internationals taking residency places in the US, particularly if they have a non-US degree.
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    Does the UK recognise speciality training done in the US?
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    (Original post by 566)
    Does the UK recognise speciality training done in the US?
    Not as a matter of course. It may be taken into account, but you have to take the PLAB exam and repeat training, possibly going back as far as foundation years (though they may waive FY1 or even both FY1 & FY2), but you certainly cannot go straight into a consultant (attending) position, you would have to do registrar specialty training and take membership exams.
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    (Original post by theresheglows)
    If you have done UK specialty training you can apply for partial exemption from the residency programme requirement and take USMLE Step 3 sooner.

    Edit:

    debatable. getting into training with a UK degree isn't much easier if at all, although it might be less expensive and a shorter process for getting the degree. they aren't keen on internationals taking residency places in the US, particularly if they have a non-US degree.
    You have a backup if you go to the UK, that is why option 2 is the best. While it is true that they don't prefer UK grads, UK grads almost always match (still there is selection bias as only those who do well apply)
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    (Original post by Okorange)
    You have a backup if you go to the UK, that is why option 2 is the best. While it is true that they don't prefer UK grads, UK grads almost always match (still there is selection bias as only those who do well apply)
    Fair enough, but tbh none of these options is a good one as either way it is hard to get a visa. It's a little easier during GME (residency) as this gives grounds for a J1 temporary visa (on which you have to return home for at least 2 years after training), but getting an employment visa, particularly a settlement visa, is extremely hard.
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    (Original post by theresheglows)
    Fair enough, but tbh none of these options is a good one as either way it is hard to get a visa. It's a little easier during GME (residency) as this gives grounds for a J1 temporary visa (on which you have to return home for at least 2 years after training), but getting an employment visa, particularly a settlement visa, is extremely hard.
    If you have to return to UK for two years after doing your residency in america will you be able to practise in those two years? Because if you can't then what's the point in coming back? Surely the UK should just issue you a J-1 visa waiver if you'll be of no use to the medical force when you come back anyway?
 
 
 
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