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    There's a story I've been thinking of but it requires a Sci-Fi element.

    Basically:

    Online dating is now 100% accurate. When the youngest partner turns 24 they meet their future wife/husband.
    Dates are not optional and everyone must obey. After numerous dates there is a deadline to move in, marry etc.
    If you refuse there are consequences and is an act of defiance. It has a 100% success rate (although there is always one... Start of plot)

    This seems very cheesy, I know. But it's not. I'll be writing quite a dark story about depression / anxiety / the future.

    I need this plot to get the two characters together and I can't write the story without it, but my question:

    Would you automatically dismiss this book because of the set up?


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    it sounds like a good plot. is it in the future ?
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    This sounds like the Matched Trilogy! Thoroughly enjoyed those books https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7735333-matched#
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    Would you automatically dismiss this book because of the set up?
    Yes, due to the fact that you're planning to use a single exception to propagate the plot. It would be difficult for a writer to suspend disbelief to such an extent that the book is at once convincing the reader that the programme has a "100% success rate" but that there is also "always one". Coincidences like that make for awkward plots and putting it right at the beginning would turn me off.

    I like the idea that people are forced to interact with whoever is offered. I think that that is, in itself, a really good dystopian theme (and I'm sure you can think up reasons why someone or some group of people would want to implement it). By making the errors more frequent, you could build more affecting character relationships. You'd have two main groups of people: those that succeeded through the plan and those that did not, and then within the latter you could have relationships in which love is rejected by both or unrequited.

    I haven't read the series that Deceitful Dove has mentioned, but I imagine it encounters this problem. From the synopsis, the plot revolves around one person whilst everyone else magically ticks over. That may lead to some psychological depth but it's never going to lead to a description of a future society, because it's limited to that one character's (enormously) unfortunate perspective. It can never have that scope.
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    (Original post by Roseland)
    Yes, due to the fact that you're planning to use a single exception to propagate the plot. It would be difficult for a writer to suspend disbelief to such an extent that the book is at once convincing the reader that the programme has a "100% success rate" but that there is also "always one". Coincidences like that make for awkward plots and putting it right at the beginning would turn me off.

    I like the idea that people are forced to interact with whoever is offered. I think that that is, in itself, a really good dystopian theme (and I'm sure you can think up reasons why someone or some group of people would want to implement it). By making the errors more frequent, you could build more affecting character relationships. You'd have two main groups of people: those that succeeded through the plan and those that did not, and then within the latter you could have relationships in which love is rejected by both or unrequited.

    I haven't read the series that Deceitful Dove has mentioned, but I imagine it encounters this problem. From the synopsis, the plot revolves around one person whilst everyone else magically ticks over. That may lead to some psychological depth but it's never going to lead to a description of a future society, because it's limited to that one character's (enormously) unfortunate perspective. It can never have that scope.
    Thank you for the reply, I will definitely take that into consideration.

    What I've wrote above is a very very brief description of the plot. It's more complicated than 'always one' so hopefully with a deeper and more complex story it will be easier for the readers to believe.

    And yes, I'm still working on the background and reason why these new rules / ways of living are being enforced, I have a few ideas so once i start writing it should come together.



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    (Original post by DeceitfulDove)
    This sounds like the Matched Trilogy! Thoroughly enjoyed those books https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7735333-matched#
    Damn, our stories sound so similar! Thank you for telling me about this, I'm going to read the books and see if it's still okay to write mine. Hopefully there will be enough differences between them..


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