O9tharakanc
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Hi all currently I am an AS student and I am motivated to do dentistry at uni. I would really like to get 4 a's at as level as my gcses are not that good I am doing bio,chemistry ,physics and maths. Any previous students or dentistry applicants got any advice. Please
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TVIO
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(Original post by O9tharakanc)
Hi all currently I am an AS student and I am motivated to do dentistry at uni. I would really like to get 4 a's at as level as my gcses are not that good I am doing bio,chemistry ,physics and maths. Any previous students or dentistry applicants got any advice. Please
Past papers. Cant emphasise enough. also make sure you understand every topic in maths otherwise itll come back to haunt you.
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schindlers list
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(Original post by O9tharakanc)
Hi all currently I am an AS student and I am motivated to do dentistry at uni. I would really like to get 4 a's at as level as my gcses are not that good I am doing bio,chemistry ,physics and maths. Any previous students or dentistry applicants got any advice. Please
First learn fundamental grammar rules.
4As*
You might end up with 4Es if you're lucky.
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morgan8002
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(Original post by schindlers list)
First learn fundamental grammar rules.
4As*
You might end up with 4Es if you're lucky.
You don't need to learn grammar to get As in those subjects.

For maths and physics, do lots of questions in past papers and books.

For biology and chemistry, keep reading through your notes and the textbook.
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schindlers list
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(Original post by morgan8002)
You don't need to learn grammar to get As in those subjects.

For maths and physics, do lots of questions in past papers and books.

For biology and chemistry, keep reading through your notes and the textbook.
For alevels, youd be expected to be grammatically adherent, to avoid not comprehending the question which may be asked
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morgan8002
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(Original post by schindlers list)
For alevels, youd be expected to be grammatically adherent, to avoid not comprehending the question which may be asked
You can easily get As without understanding grammar. On the other hand, it is a very good idea to get it correct and it does say something about the ability of the person in question to understand more important concepts.
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schindlers list
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(Original post by morgan8002)
You can easily get As without understanding grammar. On the other hand, it is a very good idea to get it correct and it does say something about the ability of the person in question to understand more important concepts.
Grammar needs to be on point otherwise you'll fail. It seems you need some tutorials on english grammar
Heres a few sites
Http://www.mrbruff.co.uk
Try them
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morgan8002
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(Original post by schindlers list)
Grammar needs to be on point otherwise you'll fail. It seems you need some tutorials on english grammar
Heres a few sites
Http://www.mrbruff.co.uk
Try them
There's nothing wrong with my grammar. You haven't contributed anything to the OP. Did you even study biology, chemistry, maths and physics at A-level?
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schindlers list
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(Original post by morgan8002)
There's nothing wrong with my grammar. You haven't contributed anything to the OP. Did you even study biology, chemistry, maths and physics at A-level?
Yes i do indeed
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O9tharakanc
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(Original post by TVIO)
Past papers. Cant emphasise enough. also make sure you understand every topic in maths otherwise itll come back to haunt you.
Thanks for the advice I'm trying best making notes and doing past papers but there are so many units altogether and so much content i just don't know how to remember all the info
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O9tharakanc
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(Original post by schindlers list)
First learn fundamental grammar rules.
4As*
You might end up with 4Es if you're lucky.
If you ain't got anything else to do than correct people, well that says a lot doesn't it
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O9tharakanc
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(Original post by morgan8002)
You don't need to learn grammar to get As in those subjects.

For maths and physics, do lots of questions in past papers and books.

For biology and chemistry, keep reading through your notes and the textbook.
Thanks if you don't mind me asking did you do these subjects? What did you get?
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dragonkeeper999
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I suggest you first focus on fully understanding EVERYTHING in lessons - if at any point you are confused, spend some extra time going over your notes/ go along to a lunchtime workshop session if your school runs them/ ask your teacher for help/ look up more information in a textbook until you really understand it.

At the end of each topic write up your class notes into more concise notes - this will help to consolidate the information in your mind, revise for any end-of-topic tests, and give you short revision notes for exam time. I suggest reading through these again over the Easter holidays - and if necessary re-writing them.

I also found it helpful to create a revision quiz using flash-cards, and a couple of us did it at lunchtimes and on the bus It's quite a fun and relaxed way to revise during random short sections of free time. Another way of making revision a bit more fun (and hence, more memorable) is to create colourful posters for each topic and sticking them on your bedroom wall (you can even take it a step further and coat your entire house in posters - so you can revise by reading the posters in the shower each morning...).

Over Easter and the following term, focus on past papers - literally do ALL the past papers from the last 10 years or so. I found it helpful to create a spreadsheet with all the past papers in a grid - when I completed a past paper I wrote my score in and colour coded it depending on how well I had done. I worked from the older papers to the newest, so could easily see my improvement across the spreadsheet as well as ensuring I am practicing the most recent past papers closer to the exam. When you do past papers, try to complete them in the time limit and do your usual checks afterwards. Make sure you mark them ABSOLUTELY according to the mark scheme - don't give yourself marks for being 'almost right'. If you notice particular questions coming up frequently, it might be worth writing example answers.

Just before the exams (say a couple of days before) re-read your revision notes again and make separate notes on stuff you didn't know off-by-heart, then focus on just memorising these (hopefully just a few) things before the exam. Some people find it helpful to read through their completed past papers too.

This might sound like a lot of work - but start preparing and revising early and actually it is very manageable Try and give yourself plenty of short revision breaks, and work in a quiet studious environment so you can really concentrate on getting work done. I found turning my computer/ phone off helpful too - and often went to the library to avoid distractions
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2344277
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(Original post by TVIO)
Past papers. Cant emphasise enough. also make sure you understand every topic in maths otherwise itll come back to haunt you.
This. Past papers are the BEST way to revise once you've got the basic knowledge - by learning the mark schemes you know exactly what the examiners want you to say, especially in bio/chem I know this is true!

It doesn't matter how well you understand the theory (at GCSE that is enough to get a good grade) if you don't say what's on the mark scheme you won't get the marks!
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morgan8002
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(Original post by O9tharakanc)
Thanks if you don't mind me asking did you do these subjects? What did you get?
Yes, as well as further maths. I'm in year 13 now. I took A2 maths early. My grades were A2: A*, AS: AAAAB
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O9tharakanc
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(Original post by dragonkeeper999)
I suggest you first focus on fully understanding EVERYTHING in lessons - if at any point you are confused, spend some extra time going over your notes/ go along to a lunchtime workshop session if your school runs them/ ask your teacher for help/ look up more information in a textbook until you really understand it.

At the end of each topic write up your class notes into more concise notes - this will help to consolidate the information in your mind, revise for any end-of-topic tests, and give you short revision notes for exam time. I suggest reading through these again over the Easter holidays - and if necessary re-writing them.

I also found it helpful to create a revision quiz using flash-cards, and a couple of us did it at lunchtimes and on the bus It's quite a fun and relaxed way to revise during random short sections of free time. Another way of making revision a bit more fun (and hence, more memorable) is to create colourful posters for each topic and sticking them on your bedroom wall (you can even take it a step further and coat your entire house in posters - so you can revise by reading the posters in the shower each morning...).

Over Easter and the following term, focus on past papers - literally do ALL the past papers from the last 10 years or so. I found it helpful to create a spreadsheet with all the past papers in a grid - when I completed a past paper I wrote my score in and colour coded it depending on how well I had done. I worked from the older papers to the newest, so could easily see my improvement across the spreadsheet as well as ensuring I am practicing the most recent past papers closer to the exam. When you do past papers, try to complete them in the time limit and do your usual checks afterwards. Make sure you mark them ABSOLUTELY according to the mark scheme - don't give yourself marks for being 'almost right'. If you notice particular questions coming up frequently, it might be worth writing example answers.

Just before the exams (say a couple of days before) re-read your revision notes again and make separate notes on stuff you didn't know off-by-heart, then focus on just memorising these (hopefully just a few) things before the exam. Some people find it helpful to read through their completed past papers too.

This might sound like a lot of work - but start preparing and revising early and actually it is very manageable Try and give yourself plenty of short revision breaks, and work in a quiet studious environment so you can really concentrate on getting work done. I found turning my computer/ phone off helpful too - and often went to the library to avoid distractions
Thank you so much for the advice. I have started revising topics now as I know the subject I have taken require a lot of effort. I just hope all the work i put in pays off. If you don't mind me asking what did you get?
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O9tharakanc
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(Original post by 2344277)
This. Past papers are the BEST way to revise once you've got the basic knowledge - by learning the mark schemes you know exactly what the examiners want you to say, especially in bio/chem I know this is true!

It doesn't matter how well you understand the theory (at GCSE that is enough to get a good grade) if you don't say what's on the mark scheme you won't get the marks!
Thanks it's just learning all the basic knowledge first. At college we have only finished a few units at the moment I'm trying to teach myself everything so I can do past papers.
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O9tharakanc
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(Original post by morgan8002)
Yes, as well as further maths. I'm in year 13 now. I took A2 maths early. My grades were A2: A*, AS: AAAAB
That is amazing well done. When did you start revising for your exams and what were your revision techniques? I want your grades as well
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Meher Nissa
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does anyone know where I can find the answers to the edexcel AS chemistry student book by Ann Fullick. Its not in the Cd as well
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morgan8002
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(Original post by O9tharakanc)
That is amazing well done. When did you start revising for your exams and what were your revision techniques? I want your grades as well
I mostly worked throughout the year, increasing the time that I put in as exams got closer.

As I already said, for maths and physics it's all about practising answering questions, get as much practice as you can on past papers/textbooks. For biology and chemistry, there is much more to memorise, so you need to spend more time going through notes/reading textbook to make sure that you remember everything you need to. For biology, the exam questions are sometimes very vague/ambiguous, so go through past paper questions with the mark schemes to make sure that you understand the style of the questions.

If you want a more detailed breakdown of my grades, they are on my profile. I can't be bothered to write them all up again.
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