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    (Original post by PharmingDoc)
    This isn't entirely true, especially for the medical field. The university has a duty to determine if you're fit to practice and if you're not, even due to a disability well then they can kick u out :/



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    Yes, but that's the same in any course. If you're academically able and have a good personal statement it shouldn't matter if you have health issues. Of course certain degrees would be difficult for disabled people, the first springing to mind would be a sports degree that involves physical activity which would be a reasonable barrier for somebody who cannot walk and thus a rejection from such a course could not be considered discrimination unless there were adjustments that could be made to allow the person to do the course.
    But you can not be rejected for a course on the grounds that you have health issues unless they are a real barrier to stopping you from completing in that course (as mentioned above.)
    And yes, people can be thrown off courses due to health issues impacting their attendance and grades. But as I have stated, you cannot discriminate because somebody has either physical or mental health issues without very good reason.


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    Sadly, it not the same for any course. For professional medical courses if a student is unable to pass a occupational health assessment and is deemed unfit to study/ practice then a place can be rejected on those grounds. The university has a duty of care and reputation to ensure professionals meet the required standards, or graduates may be compromised when applying for jobs. I'm aware that students applying for medical courses with mental health problems have been rejected in the past.

    Interesting comment above about a physical course not being appropriate for a disabled person- not in this day in age.
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    There are many many many medical students and indeed many many many doctors with mental illnesses. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with fitness to practice. For more info see here: http://www.gmc-uk.org/education/13270.asp

    If someone with type 1 diabetes has poorly controlled diabetes, with unpredictable hypos and hospital admissions affecting ability to study or work, they will probably be advised by occupational health to take some time out. If after this time, things don't improve and their ability to work remains poor after a few chances then they will probably found to not be fit to practice.

    If someone with bipolar disorder has poorly controlled episodes, with manic episodes that are uncontrolled affecting their ability to study or work, they will probably be advised by occupational health to take some time out to get treatment control. If after this time, things don't improve and their ability to work remains poor after a few chances then they will probably found to not be fit to practice.

    If someone with type 1 diabetes has well controlled diabetes, there is no fitness to practice issue.
    If someone with type 1 bipolar disorder has well controlled bipolar disorder, there is no fitness to practice issue.

    Depression will not affect your application. You should declare that you have a medical condition on your application form(you don't need to on the personal statement), and on the occupational health form they send you when you are offered a place. They will probably just have an appt with you before you start to check if there is any support you need. Your teacher doesn't need to say anything about it.
 
 
 
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