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How favourable are you to Turkey's potential entry into the EU? watch

  • View Poll Results: How favourable are you to Turkey's potential entry into the EU?
    10 (Most favourable)
    1
    2.17%
    9
    3
    6.52%
    8
    4
    8.70%
    7
    5
    10.87%
    6
    2
    4.35%
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    13.04%
    4
    4
    8.70%
    3
    3
    6.52%
    2
    0
    0%
    1 (Least favourable)
    16
    34.78%
    Don't Know
    2
    4.35%

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    How favourable are you to Turkey's potential entry into the EU?

    Vote and discuss.
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    i feel indifferent at turkey entering europe/
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    If France had it's way, Turkey would never enter the EU. Never.

    As a Brit who is patriotically obliged to disagree with the French at every level, I whole-heartedly endorse Turkey's bid to enter the Union. :p:

    On a serious note however, I think it'd be good to have an Islamic nation within the EU. It might aid our understanding and bring us closer together. On the other hand, the ME might see Turkey as traitorous and blow it to smitherines. Ho hum, we can but wait and see.

    However, I don't want to see a flood of Turks coming to Britain. They can stay in their own country, or go to Germany or something. Same goes for any other ascending EU nations.
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    Given Turkey's less than perfect record in terms of human rights and civil liberties, and that most of it isn't what I would class European, I think Turkey should be made a priveleged partner and perhaps a member of the EEA, but not given EU membership.

    Perhaps it could get more priveleges as it tidies up things like rights and liberties, and it's relationship with Greece and Cyprus.
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    I used to be pro-Turkish accession, but I've cooled on that since this business over the Armenian Genocide flared up. In my view, Turkey is far from ready, but never say never.
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    hmmm... depends on when it would join.

    While in a long-term perspective I believe that allowing Turkey to join would benefit the EU, I don't think that Turkey is (or will be for some time) ready to do so. Also, sharing a border with countries like Iraq is not exactly a welcome prospect.
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    Maybe in 500 years when they have moved up to an acceptable level of human rights
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    (Original post by The_Bear)
    Maybe in 500 years when they have moved up to an acceptable level of human rights
    A tad harsh, wouldn't you agree?

    It is undeniable that Turkey has serious human rights issues, which it has been competently dealing with over the last decade or so. However, dismissing it as a candidate solely on this basis is weak, especially since we have allowed entry for countries such as Poland, Cyprus, and Romania into the European Union.
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    Given that Tony Blair admitted surrendering much of the British rebate to "invest" in the 2004 accession countries, I hate to think how much more money we'll have to pour down the EU toilet if Turkey joins.
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    I support it. If we can improve Turkey's human rights record then that is an excellent objective.

    New Imperialism. It's fantastic.
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    (Original post by Carl)
    Given Turkey's less than perfect record in terms of human rights and civil liberties, and that most of it isn't what I would class European, I think Turkey should be made a priveleged partner and perhaps a member of the EEA, but not given EU membership.
    "Less that perfect" Do you mean crap?
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    i really couldnt give a damn if they came or not, its not as though it will make a difference to me
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    And again, I am the only one who will bring up the fact that Turkey shares a border with Syria, Iran and Iraq. Say hello to our new neighbours
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    (Original post by Lib North)
    I support it. If we can improve Turkey's human rights record then that is an excellent objective.

    New Imperialism. It's fantastic.
    I take it you mean use the EU as a carrot to get Turkey to improve, and then allow it in, yes?
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    I don't think Turkey is ready yet. They obviously have more things to sort out.

    I don't think Romania and Bulgaria are ready yet either. But the EU nevertheless accepted them.

    Economic-wise, EU enlargement is theoretically favourable. But since we live in a European Union, where what we share is beyond economics, I think their membership is something that should be contemplated. The European Union itself is absolutely flawed.
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    I think if Turkey enters the EU, the EU will find it very difficult to function as anything other than an economic association, which surely is a good development if we here in Britain are finding it difficult to surrender our political rights to Brussels.
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    The rather selfish question that we have to ask ourselves is what have we to gain from turkey entering the E.U.? The answer realisticaly boils down to two things- Culturaly we would gain one of the most important cities in history- istanbul, as part of the union, this would possibly be good to attract american tourists, on the basisi that recently trips to europe have been marketed on holidays to the union as a whole. Secondly we would gain a pool of potentialy cheap labour in the short run. In the long run the E.U. minimum wage would force the price of this up. do these benifits outweigh the billions of euros of E.U. funds that turkey would consume, coupled with an exodus from the country already dis-advantaging the poorest workers in our society as they cannot compete? Economicaly the answer is definitley no, Turkey is a reletavly backwards economy compared to our own, and has very little to offer to the long term economic prosperity of europe. There are also several serious cultural matters that we need to address when assesing turkeys membership: An islamic country in the E.U.- that surley sends out a powerful message to british muslims about the tolerance of the e.u.- This is most definatley true. However as somebody has stated earlier, if turkey joined the E.U., with a population of 100 million it would be the largest member state, and therefore able to dominate discusions at the council level (unless Germany, France Britian and Italy combined to some extent) this couples with upwards pressure particualry from some aspects of the British and French population to become more pro islamic could lead to an exacerbation of the political correctness era, and even some islamic laws passed through the back door. There is also the issue of human rights, and in particular Turkeys refusal to acknowladge the armenian genocide- this illustrates further shifts from the E.U. status qua and suggest even more cultural distance. If we allow turkey to join the E.U., where do we draw the line? Morroco for example is also in a geographical area which is on the european borderline (i.e it has spain only a few miles to the north, and most of it was part of spain until recently- plus the canaries to the west) would we then consider membership of such nations as this. It is clear that the costs of Turkey joining teh E.U. far outweigh the benifits, Politicaly, Culturaly and economicaly, I am personaly in favour of keeping turkey as a favoured partner of the E.U., but I would flat out reject its membership.
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    (Original post by Agent Smith)
    I take it you mean use the EU as a carrot to get Turkey to improve, and then allow it in, yes?
    Indeed.
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    OK. Well, that's what the EU's been doing up to now, but the Armenian Genocide thing has soured relations somewhat. For that and other reasons the feeling is now that Turkey needs to improve significantly in order for its membership to even be seriously discussed. So the carrot is being held quite a distance from the donkey.
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    The most important question is whether the cost of allowing Turkey into the EU is greater than the risk of Turkey abandoning the West, and embracing the Middle East.

    For the last 80-90 years, Turkey has been an incredibly staunch ally of the West. It was our Cuba during the Cold War, it was a part of the Allies in World War II, a staunch ally in the 'War Against Terror', a democratic nation, which happens to be the only Muslim majority country which is secular, and has a good relationship with Israel.

    If Turkey abandons the West, after decades of Western refusal to embrace Turkey, then the consequences for the West would be dramatic in my opinion. The so-called Bridge of Civilizations would turn in on itself, and look towards the oppressive and totalitarian regimes of Saudi Arabia, Iran and such. Do we really want a country like that in Europe? Surely if we do not want to create, or witness a Clash of Civilizations, as predicted by Huntington, we should be more actively engaging Turkey in discussions, trying to improve their human rights records, and their economy.
 
 
 
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