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AQA Physics PHYA4 - Thursday 11th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    (Original post by CD223)
    Has anyone tried the "exam style questions" at the end of each chapter of the book? I just didn't know if they were worth doing


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    I have for phya4 all the chapters except magnetism and emi since i cant do that chapter!
    Theyre quite good for phya4 tbh and it's helped me quite a lot especially since there isn't a lot of past papers! 😀
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    (Original post by JJBinn)
    Yeah chapter one is alright to be honest. Some heavy notes on telescopes coming up though

    I've looked at those exam style questions in the text book btw and decided against them. They seem really wordy and not actually exam like at all. I just do the summary questions and then for exam practice I'll go to actual papers.
    Oh no :/

    They are a collection of old style exam questions I think. I did the summary questions after each lesson so I've done all of the ones in the Nelson Thornes book this year, and all of them up to 2.3 in the Astro notes. I didn't know if I should go onto past papers now or do some ESQs!


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    (Original post by Mai.H)
    I have for phya4 all the chapters except magnetism and emi since i cant do that chapter!
    Theyre quite good for phya4 tbh and it's helped me quite a lot especially since there isn't a lot of past papers! 😀
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    Ah I might give them a go then - thanks!

    Did they take you long at all?


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    Unfortunately yeah but its worth it!
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    (Original post by Mai.H)
    Unfortunately yeah but its worth it!
    I better get cracking then!


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    Can someone explain how more damping than critical damping can actually mean the amplitude of oscillations is reduced less with each cycle?


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Can someone explain how more damping than critical damping can actually mean the amplitude of oscillations is reduced less with each cycle?


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    Is that overdamping? whereby it takes longer to return to equilibrium. I think its because the displacement is gradually reduced but in critically damped its built to suddenly stop displacement. Not too sure if thats any help lol
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    Hi, can anyone explain how you know when to choose [R=mv^2/r + mg] or when to choose [R=mg-mv^2/r] as i dont know which one to use when. Thanks
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    (Original post by Jed-Singh)
    Hi, can anyone explain how you know when to choose [R=mv^2/r + mg] or when to choose [R=mg-mv^2/r] as i dont know which one to use when. Thanks
    Its when say on a fairground wheel one is used when your at the top and the other is when your at the bottom i usally work it out using a force diagram
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    (Original post by Jed-Singh)
    Is that overdamping? whereby it takes longer to return to equilibrium. I think its because the displacement is gradually reduced but in critically damped its built to suddenly stop displacement. Not too sure if thats any help lol
    Yeah I could never understand why more damping than critical damping actually means it is free to oscillate more than critical damping!


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    (Original post by Jed-Singh)
    Hi, can anyone explain how you know when to choose [R=mv^2/r + mg] or when to choose [R=mg-mv^2/r] as i dont know which one to use when. Thanks
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1429718484.796656.jpg
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    This diagram uses T for tension, but the same principle applies for R.


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    Need to ask you something

    last year I did PHY6X but this year I'm doing PHY6T even though they're worth different amounts of UMS. Will it still count to my final grade etc?
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    (Original post by AR_95)
    Need to ask you something

    last year I did PHY6X but this year I'm doing PHY6T even though they're worth different amounts of UMS. Will it still count to my final grade etc?
    They are worth the same amount of UMS (out of 60). They may be different numbers of marks for the respective tasks, but they will be scaled so that the UMS gained for unit 6X and unit 6T will be the same.

    The exams are worth 120 UMS each, so 60 UMS gained from unit 6 on either scheme X or scheme T will make the 300 UMS total that make up the year.


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    (Original post by CD223)
    They are worth the same amount of UMS (out of 60). They may be different numbers of marks for the respective tasks, but they will be scaled so that the UMS gained for unit 6X and unit 6T will be the same.

    The exams are worth 120 UMS each, so 60 UMS gained from unit 6 on either scheme X or scheme T will make the 300 UMS total that make up the year.


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    Oh ok so I'm allowed to do either
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    (Original post by AR_95)
    Oh ok so I'm allowed to do either
    In theory yes, although most centres enter candidates for the same scheme in both years.


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Yeah I could never understand why more damping than critical damping actually means it is free to oscillate more than critical damping!


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    It's not free to oscillate.
    There is no oscillation if the damping is equal to or greater than critical.
    In these cases the mass returns to equilibrium and stays there.
    The only difference is that it takes longer to get there as the damping increases. This is perfectly logical, as more damping means more resistance, this means the mass moves more slowly, which means it takes longer to get to the equilibrium point.
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    (Original post by CD223)
    In theory yes, although most centres enter candidates for the same scheme in both years.


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    I did PHY6X at school where as I'm doing PHY6T at a different centre now. It's probably because they only do T?
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    (Original post by Stonebridge)
    It's not free to oscillate.
    There is no oscillation if the damping is equal to or greater than critical.
    In these cases the mass returns to equilibrium and stays there.
    The only difference is that it takes longer to get there as the damping increases. This is perfectly logical, as more damping means more resistance, this means the mass moves more slowly, which means it takes longer to get to the equilibrium point.
    That makes sense. I was thinking it just oscillates for longer, which wasn't logical.

    Thank you


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    (Original post by AR_95)
    I did PHY6X at school where as I'm doing PHY6T at a different centre now. It's probably because they only do T?
    That would make sense, I wouldn't worry! You're not the first person on this thread who has changed schemes


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1429718484.796656.jpg
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    This diagram uses T for tension, but the same principle applies for R.


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    ah, so is Resultant Force (R) the opposite of T? ie the negative form of those equations is R?
 
 
 
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