Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now

AQA Physics PHYA4 - Thursday 11th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    How is it cheating, sorry I'm lost haha.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I don't know why I don't get notification from this thread, it's annoying.

    It's cheating because Newton merely wanted to explain things according to their appearances, however he could with all the possible means. But i guess he's still in a strong position




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    (Original post by floyd_mayweather)
    i have all 36 chemistry marks with answers, willing to provide ADVICE on all 36 marks if somebody has ADVICE for all 24 Physics marks
    i will help you are u doing an empa in phsics i have alrready done it , could u please help with chemistry empa written paper pm me
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone know how the exam is given out? Do you get 45 mins for section A then an hour for section B, or do you get both papers together and it's up to you how much you spend on each?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ubisoft)
    Anyone know how the exam is given out? Do you get 45 mins for section A then an hour for section B, or do you get both papers together and it's up to you how much you spend on each?
    That's the recommended time expenditure but you could split your time however you want


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ubisoft)
    Anyone know how the exam is given out? Do you get 45 mins for section A then an hour for section B, or do you get both papers together and it's up to you how much you spend on each?
    The latter - you get both, with the recommended split being 45/60 mins.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
    I don't know why I don't get notification from this thread, it's annoying.

    It's cheating because Newton merely wanted to explain things according to their appearances, however he could with all the possible means. But i guess he's still in a strong position




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ah, that's frustrating.

    Oh I see. Ha, I guess it's just another thing we have to accept.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I put together a list of all the six markers that have come up so I can refer back to them more easily and figured I might as well post them here in case anyone else finds it useful, so here's the unit 4 ones:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    January 2010 – Describe two causes of the energy losses in a transformer and discuss how these energy losses may be reduced by suitable design and choice of materials.

    June 2010 – Deep space probes often carry modules which may be ejected from them by an explosion. A space probe of total mass 500 kg is travelling in a straight line through free space at 160 ms–1 when it ejects a capsule of mass 150 kg explosively, releasing energy. Immediately after the explosion the probe, now of mass 350 kg, continues to travel in the original straight line but travels at 240 ms–1, as shown in Figure 2. Discuss how the principles of conservation of momentum and conservation of energy apply in this instance.

    January 2011 – A student was required to design an experiment to measure the acceleration of a heavy cylinder as it rolled down an inclined slope of constant gradient. He suggested an arrangement that would make use of a capacitor-resistor discharge circuit to measure the time taken for the cylinder to travel between two points on the slope. The principle of this arrangement is shown in Figure 2. [diagram needed!] Describe the procedure the student should follow, including the measurements he should make, when using this arrangement. Explain how he should use the measurements taken to calculate the acceleration of the cylinder down the slope. (I found this question easier doing part b first).

    June 2011 – Discuss the principles involved in high voltage transmission systems, explaining why a.c. is used in preference to d.c. and how the energy losses are minimised.

    January 2012 – Figure 5 shows an experimental arrangement that can be used to demonstrate magnetic levitation. The iron rod is fixed vertically inside a large coil of wire. When the alternating current supply to the coil is switched on, the aluminium ring moves up the rod until it reaches a stable position ‘floating’ above the coil. By reference to the laws of electromagnetic induction explain
    • why a current will be induced in the ring,
    • why the ring experiences a force that moves it upwards,
    • why the ring reaches a stable position.

    June 2012 – The amount of energy required to move a manned spacecraft from the Earth to the Moon is much greater than that required to return it to the Earth. By reference to the forces involved, to gravitational field strength and gravitational potential, and to the point X, explain why this is so.

    January 2013 – These geosynchronous and polar satellites have different applications because of their different orbits in relation to the rotation of the Earth. Compare the principal features of the geosynchronous and polar orbits and explain the consequences for possible uses of satellites in these orbits. In your answer you should explain why:
    • a low polar orbit is suitable for a satellite used to monitor conditions on the Earth.
    • a geosynchronous circular orbit above the Equator is especially suitable for satellite used in communications.

    June 2013 – Gravitational fields and electric fields have many features in common but also have several differences. For both radial and uniform gravitational and electric fields, compare and contrast their common features and their differences. In your answer you should consider:
    • the force acting between particles or charges
    • gravitational field strength and electric field strength
    • gravitational potential and electric potential.

    June 2014 – The circuit in Figure 6 contains a cell, an uncharged capacitor, a fixed resistor and a two-way switch. [diagram needed]. The switch is moved to position 1 until the capacitor is fully charged. The switch is then moved to position 2. Describe what happens in this circuit after the switch is moved to position 1, and after it has been moved to position 2. In your answer you should refer to:
    • the direction in which electrons flow in the circuit, and how the flow of electrons changes with time,
    • how the potential differences across the resistor and the capacitor change with time,
    • the energy changes which take place in the circuit.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lau14)
    I put together a list of all the six markers that have come up so I can refer back to them more easily and figured I might as well post them here in case anyone else finds it useful, so here's the unit 4 ones:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    January 2010 – Describe two causes of the energy losses in a transformer and discuss how these energy losses may be reduced by suitable design and choice of materials.

    June 2010 – Deep space probes often carry modules which may be ejected from them by an explosion. A space probe of total mass 500 kg is travelling in a straight line through free space at 160 ms–1 when it ejects a capsule of mass 150 kg explosively, releasing energy. Immediately after the explosion the probe, now of mass 350 kg, continues to travel in the original straight line but travels at 240 ms–1, as shown in Figure 2. Discuss how the principles of conservation of momentum and conservation of energy apply in this instance.

    January 2011 – A student was required to design an experiment to measure the acceleration of a heavy cylinder as it rolled down an inclined slope of constant gradient. He suggested an arrangement that would make use of a capacitor-resistor discharge circuit to measure the time taken for the cylinder to travel between two points on the slope. The principle of this arrangement is shown in Figure 2. [diagram needed!] Describe the procedure the student should follow, including the measurements he should make, when using this arrangement. Explain how he should use the measurements taken to calculate the acceleration of the cylinder down the slope. (I found this question easier doing part b first).

    June 2011 – Discuss the principles involved in high voltage transmission systems, explaining why a.c. is used in preference to d.c. and how the energy losses are minimised.

    January 2012 – Figure 5 shows an experimental arrangement that can be used to demonstrate magnetic levitation. The iron rod is fixed vertically inside a large coil of wire. When the alternating current supply to the coil is switched on, the aluminium ring moves up the rod until it reaches a stable position ‘floating’ above the coil. By reference to the laws of electromagnetic induction explain
    •why a current will be induced in the ring,
    •why the ring experiences a force that moves it upwards,
    •why the ring reaches a stable position.

    June 2012 – The amount of energy required to move a manned spacecraft from the Earth to the Moon is much greater than that required to return it to the Earth. By reference to the forces involved, to gravitational field strength and gravitational potential, and to the point X, explain why this is so.

    January 2013 – These geosynchronous and polar satellites have different applications because of their different orbits in relation to the rotation of the Earth. Compare the principal features of the geosynchronous and polar orbits and explain the consequences for possible uses of satellites in these orbits. In your answer you should explain why:
    •a low polar orbit is suitable for a satellite used to monitor conditions on the Earth.
    •a geosynchronous circular orbit above the Equator is especially suitable for satellite used in communications.

    June 2013 – Gravitational fields and electric fields have many features in common but also have several differences. For both radial and uniform gravitational and electric fields, compare and contrast their common features and their differences. In your answer you should consider:
    •the force acting between particles or charges
    •gravitational field strength and electric field strength
    •gravitational potential and electric potential.

    June 2014 – The circuit in Figure 6 contains a cell, an uncharged capacitor, a fixed resistor and a two-way switch. [diagram needed]. The switch is moved to position 1 until the capacitor is fully charged. The switch is then moved to position 2. Describe what happens in this circuit after the switch is moved to position 1, and after it has been moved to position 2. In your answer you should refer to:
    •the direction in which electrons flow in the circuit, and how the flow of electrons changes with time,
    •how the potential differences across the resistor and the capacitor change with time,
    •the energy changes which take place in the circuit.
    I guess the examiners can make a six marks question out of an one mark question. The pattern is unpredictable


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lau14)
    I put together a list of all the six markers that have come up so I can refer back to them more easily and figured I might as well post them here in case anyone else finds it useful, so here's the unit 4 ones:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    January 2010 – Describe two causes of the energy losses in a transformer and discuss how these energy losses may be reduced by suitable design and choice of materials.

    June 2010 – Deep space probes often carry modules which may be ejected from them by an explosion. A space probe of total mass 500 kg is travelling in a straight line through free space at 160 ms–1 when it ejects a capsule of mass 150 kg explosively, releasing energy. Immediately after the explosion the probe, now of mass 350 kg, continues to travel in the original straight line but travels at 240 ms–1, as shown in Figure 2. Discuss how the principles of conservation of momentum and conservation of energy apply in this instance.

    January 2011 – A student was required to design an experiment to measure the acceleration of a heavy cylinder as it rolled down an inclined slope of constant gradient. He suggested an arrangement that would make use of a capacitor-resistor discharge circuit to measure the time taken for the cylinder to travel between two points on the slope. The principle of this arrangement is shown in Figure 2. [diagram needed!] Describe the procedure the student should follow, including the measurements he should make, when using this arrangement. Explain how he should use the measurements taken to calculate the acceleration of the cylinder down the slope. (I found this question easier doing part b first).

    June 2011 – Discuss the principles involved in high voltage transmission systems, explaining why a.c. is used in preference to d.c. and how the energy losses are minimised.

    January 2012 – Figure 5 shows an experimental arrangement that can be used to demonstrate magnetic levitation. The iron rod is fixed vertically inside a large coil of wire. When the alternating current supply to the coil is switched on, the aluminium ring moves up the rod until it reaches a stable position ‘floating’ above the coil. By reference to the laws of electromagnetic induction explain
    •why a current will be induced in the ring,
    •why the ring experiences a force that moves it upwards,
    •why the ring reaches a stable position.

    June 2012 – The amount of energy required to move a manned spacecraft from the Earth to the Moon is much greater than that required to return it to the Earth. By reference to the forces involved, to gravitational field strength and gravitational potential, and to the point X, explain why this is so.

    January 2013 – These geosynchronous and polar satellites have different applications because of their different orbits in relation to the rotation of the Earth. Compare the principal features of the geosynchronous and polar orbits and explain the consequences for possible uses of satellites in these orbits. In your answer you should explain why:
    •a low polar orbit is suitable for a satellite used to monitor conditions on the Earth.
    •a geosynchronous circular orbit above the Equator is especially suitable for satellite used in communications.

    June 2013 – Gravitational fields and electric fields have many features in common but also have several differences. For both radial and uniform gravitational and electric fields, compare and contrast their common features and their differences. In your answer you should consider:
    •the force acting between particles or charges
    •gravitational field strength and electric field strength
    •gravitational potential and electric potential.

    June 2014 – The circuit in Figure 6 contains a cell, an uncharged capacitor, a fixed resistor and a two-way switch. [diagram needed]. The switch is moved to position 1 until the capacitor is fully charged. The switch is then moved to position 2. Describe what happens in this circuit after the switch is moved to position 1, and after it has been moved to position 2. In your answer you should refer to:
    •the direction in which electrons flow in the circuit, and how the flow of electrons changes with time,
    •how the potential differences across the resistor and the capacitor change with time,
    •the energy changes which take place in the circuit.
    Again, thank you! Added to the first post - your contribution to the thread is really appreciated


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
    I guess the examiners can make a six marks question out of an one mark question. The pattern is unpredictable


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    They can. That's why the subject is so hard. What are your personal predictions for each exam?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lau14)
    I put together a list of all the six markers that have come up so I can refer back to them more easily and figured I might as well post them here in case anyone else finds it useful, so here's the unit 4 ones:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    January 2010 – Describe two causes of the energy losses in a transformer and discuss how these energy losses may be reduced by suitable design and choice of materials.

    June 2010 – Deep space probes often carry modules which may be ejected from them by an explosion. A space probe of total mass 500 kg is travelling in a straight line through free space at 160 ms–1 when it ejects a capsule of mass 150 kg explosively, releasing energy. Immediately after the explosion the probe, now of mass 350 kg, continues to travel in the original straight line but travels at 240 ms–1, as shown in Figure 2. Discuss how the principles of conservation of momentum and conservation of energy apply in this instance.

    January 2011 – A student was required to design an experiment to measure the acceleration of a heavy cylinder as it rolled down an inclined slope of constant gradient. He suggested an arrangement that would make use of a capacitor-resistor discharge circuit to measure the time taken for the cylinder to travel between two points on the slope. The principle of this arrangement is shown in Figure 2. [diagram needed!] Describe the procedure the student should follow, including the measurements he should make, when using this arrangement. Explain how he should use the measurements taken to calculate the acceleration of the cylinder down the slope. (I found this question easier doing part b first).

    June 2011 – Discuss the principles involved in high voltage transmission systems, explaining why a.c. is used in preference to d.c. and how the energy losses are minimised.

    January 2012 – Figure 5 shows an experimental arrangement that can be used to demonstrate magnetic levitation. The iron rod is fixed vertically inside a large coil of wire. When the alternating current supply to the coil is switched on, the aluminium ring moves up the rod until it reaches a stable position ‘floating’ above the coil. By reference to the laws of electromagnetic induction explain
    • why a current will be induced in the ring,
    • why the ring experiences a force that moves it upwards,
    • why the ring reaches a stable position.

    June 2012 – The amount of energy required to move a manned spacecraft from the Earth to the Moon is much greater than that required to return it to the Earth. By reference to the forces involved, to gravitational field strength and gravitational potential, and to the point X, explain why this is so.

    January 2013 – These geosynchronous and polar satellites have different applications because of their different orbits in relation to the rotation of the Earth. Compare the principal features of the geosynchronous and polar orbits and explain the consequences for possible uses of satellites in these orbits. In your answer you should explain why:
    • a low polar orbit is suitable for a satellite used to monitor conditions on the Earth.
    • a geosynchronous circular orbit above the Equator is especially suitable for satellite used in communications.

    June 2013 – Gravitational fields and electric fields have many features in common but also have several differences. For both radial and uniform gravitational and electric fields, compare and contrast their common features and their differences. In your answer you should consider:
    • the force acting between particles or charges
    • gravitational field strength and electric field strength
    • gravitational potential and electric potential.

    June 2014 – The circuit in Figure 6 contains a cell, an uncharged capacitor, a fixed resistor and a two-way switch. [diagram needed]. The switch is moved to position 1 until the capacitor is fully charged. The switch is then moved to position 2. Describe what happens in this circuit after the switch is moved to position 1, and after it has been moved to position 2. In your answer you should refer to:
    • the direction in which electrons flow in the circuit, and how the flow of electrons changes with time,
    • how the potential differences across the resistor and the capacitor change with time,
    • the energy changes which take place in the circuit.
    Thanks, but could you also write the question instead of just the answer?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ubisoft)
    Thanks, but could you also write the question instead of just the answer?
    Those are the questions?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    Those are the questions?
    Oops, I meant answers as well as questions
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ubisoft)
    Oops, I meant answers as well as questions
    Oh I see!

    Hows your revision going?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    They can. That's why the subject is so hard. What are your personal predictions for each exam?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    To be honest I was not too concerned about the six marks questions but when i looked at the list then my predictions faded away. What I think now is that the six marks questions could be anything from momentum to kinetic theory of gases. But I would still say for unit 4 the six marks is either from Gravitational or Magnetic fields and for unit 5 from Radio activity. What's yours from Unit 5?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    Oh I see!

    Hows your revision going?
    I keep meaning to revise physics but I keep going back to maths lol. Finding A2 physics really boring compared to AS. The field stuff really bores me. Haven't even started unit 5 yet
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
    To be honest I was not too concerned about the six marks questions but when i looked at the list then my predictions faded away. What I think now is that the six marks questions could be anything from momentum to kinetic theory of gases. But I would still say for unit 4 the six marks is either from Gravitational or Magnetic fields and for unit 5 from Radio activity. What's yours from Unit 5?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Hmm I think the same really. A comparison between electric and magnetic fields would be interesting.

    As for PHYA5, it could be a horrid proof of the kinetic theory of gases question, or an experiment for specific heat capacity.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
    To be honest I was not too concerned about the six marks questions but when i looked at the list then my predictions faded away. What I think now is that the six marks questions could be anything from momentum to kinetic theory of gases. But I would still say for unit 4 the six marks is either from Gravitational or Magnetic fields and for unit 5 from Radio activity. What's yours from Unit 5?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    How much ums/300 did you get at AS?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ubisoft)
    I keep meaning to revise physics but I keep going back to maths lol. Finding A2 physics really boring compared to AS. The field stuff really bores me. Haven't even started unit 5 yet
    Oh no aha. When's your first exam? Mines 5th June with Core 3.

    I preferred AS physics but it's still pretty interesting in places - especially astrophysics personally.

    It's my weakest subject so I really need to press on with it but I've had next to no time lately.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    Oh no aha. When's your first exam? Mines 5th June with Core 3.

    I preferred AS physics but it's still pretty interesting in places - especially astrophysics personally.

    It's my weakest subject so I really need to press on with it but I've had next to no time lately.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    20th MAY haha, FP4.

    I got 261/300 at AS, so should only need about 90/120 in both papers, so should be reasonably 'easy' (in loose terms) to get that after a week of revision and past papers.

    What did you get?
 
 
 
Poll
Which web browser do you use?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.