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AQA Physics PHYA5 - Thursday 18th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    (Original post by EHR223)
    all right big man
    Looooool

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    Hi guys, I'm a private candidate and have been studying from home. I've learned the whole Unit 5 syllabus and have practiced all the past paper exams because I'm not quite sure which papers I'm supposed to take and why there are so many?:| If anyone could steer me in the right direction, that would be great because I think I've probably covered more than I needed to?
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    (Original post by InNeedOfHelpASAP)
    Hi guys, I'm a private candidate and have been studying from home. I've learned the whole Unit 5 syllabus and have practiced all the past paper exams because I'm not quite sure which papers I'm supposed to take and why there are so many?:| If anyone could steer me in the right direction, that would be great because I think I've probably covered more than I needed to?
    You take the thermal/nuclear topic and one of the optional topics (applied/astro etc).
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    (Original post by saad97)
    I don't understand this s=r(theta) formula!
    Doesn't r stand for radius and s for the distance to the object? :/
    Take theta in radians, multiply by r, r being radius, you get arc length. arc length being whatever letter you want
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    (Original post by Smelfas)
    You take the thermal/nuclear topic and one of the optional topics (applied/astro etc).
    Thank you!
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    PLEASE SOMEBODY HELP ME ANSWER THIS QUESTION

    I get 237.9688u,87.72405u, 4.03468u respectively for the masses but these seem to be greater than on the mark scheme and i can't understand why??
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    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...1-QP-JUN14.PDF can anyone please explain why you dont include the neutrons in 1B)ii. ?? thanks
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    (Original post by oonic0rn)
    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...1-QP-JUN14.PDF can anyone please explain why you dont include the neutrons in 1B)ii. ?? thanks
    neutrons don't have any binding energy
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    (Original post by InNeedOfHelpASAP)
    Thank you!
    No problem mate good luck tomorrow!
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    (Original post by roar96)
    neutrons don't have any binding energy
    oooh!! do you know why that is, or is that just a fact we are supposed to know?
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    (Original post by danny9253)
    PLEASE SOMEBODY HELP ME ANSWER THIS QUESTION

    I get 237.9688u,87.72405u, 4.03468u respectively for the masses but these seem to be greater than on the mark scheme and i can't understand why??
    What paper is this?
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    (Original post by oonic0rn)
    oooh!! do you know why that is, or is that just a fact we are supposed to know?
    Neutrons aren't bound to anything, they're just by themselves
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    (Original post by Aman.1)
    What paper is this?


    No idea.. this was on the 'Maths and physic tutor' website. - https://e4cf8bb391554b7c9d8e0fc42269...r%20Energy.pdf
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    (Original post by oonic0rn)
    oooh!! do you know why that is, or is that just a fact we are supposed to know?
    I thought neutrons do have a binding energy, they're potential energy falls to a constant as they come within range of the strong nuclear force and hence they must lose mass due to E=mc2? Unless I've missed something out you would include neutrons when calculating binding energy or energy released in a nuclear reaction...
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    (Original post by oonic0rn)
    oooh!! do you know why that is, or is that just a fact we are supposed to know?
    Someone earlier mentioned the fact that they're not bound to anything therefore their binding energy is 0?

    It's just been something I've learnt :dontknow:
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    Which graphs do we need know off by heart lol?
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    (Original post by InNeedOfHelpASAP)
    Hi guys, I'm a private candidate and have been studying from home. I've learned the whole Unit 5 syllabus and have practiced all the past paper exams because I'm not quite sure which papers I'm supposed to take and why there are so many?:| If anyone could steer me in the right direction, that would be great because I think I've probably covered more than I needed to?
    I hope you haven't learnt every optional topic 😳😳😳😳


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    (Original post by MSB47)
    I thought neutrons do have a binding energy, they're potential energy falls to a constant as they come within range of the strong nuclear force and hence they must lose mass due to E=mc2? Unless I've missed something out you would include neutrons when calculating binding energy or energy released in a nuclear reaction...
    If your calculating the energy released using the change in mass, then yes neutrons are included in the calculation. But in this situation it was just about the binding energy of the nuclei. Seeing as a neutron has already split from the neutron it has no binding energy and isnt included.
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    Any 6 marker prediction for part A and astrophysics
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    In astrophysics when do you use inverse square law?
 
 
 
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