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AQA Physics PHYA5 - Thursday 18th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...C-QP-JUN12.PDF
    can anyone explain 3b)11 and 3c
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    Any predictions for 6 marker on applied physics??
    • Thread Starter
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    Can as many people as possible please vote in this survey?

    http://www.poll-maker.com/poll340727x7b2b4474-13


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    (Original post by CD223)
    For those of you asking for it, here's what I'd write for the derivation of kinetic theory:

    Attachment 430961


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    For the very last part, how does the N come into the pressure equation
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    Name:  36.PNG
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Size:  26.9 KB

    Hi can anyone help me on part ii on this. I have worked out the t but donno where to go from there. Also I don't understand when do we use s=d/t and E=(m-mo)c^2 for relativity questions and also how do we know what is m0 or m or v0 or v etc. Thanks
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    Also can anyone explain how electron scattering is used to determine nulcear radius
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    (Original post by AR_95)
    For the very last part, how does the N come into the pressure equation
    It is like multiplying by N over N - when you square the root mean square speed to get the mean square speed, you end up with N on the bottom. To cancel this when substituting it into the u squared term on top, multiply by N on top. Does that help?


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    How do you work put the mass defect?
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    (Original post by Me123456789)
    How do you work put the mass defect?
    mass of total protons + mass of total neutrons , minus the mass of the initial nucleus
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    (Original post by CD223)
    It is like multiplying by N over N - when you square the root mean square speed to get the mean square speed, you end up with N on the bottom. To cancel this when substituting it into the u squared term on top, multiply by N on top. Does that help?


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    yep thanks
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    (Original post by AR_95)
    mass of total protons + mass of total neutrons , minus the mass of the initial nucleus
    Thanks, but how would I do that for this question? (part c ii)

    A typical fission reaction in the reactor is represented by

    1 (c) (i) Calculate the number of neutrons, x.
    answer = 4.neutrons
    (1 mark)

    1 (c) (ii) Calculate the energy released, in MeV, in the fission reaction above.

    mass of neutron = 1.00867 u
    mass of 233 92U nucleus = 232.98915 u
    mass of 91 36Kr nucleus = 90.90368 u
    mass of 139 56Ba nucleus = 138.87810 u
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    (Original post by Leonacatherine)
    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...C-QP-JUN12.PDF
    can anyone explain 3b)11 and 3c
    *3bii
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    (Original post by Adangu)
    Any predictions for 6 marker on applied physics??
    Finally someone else who does applied!
    Jun 14 - wheel design/ moment of inertia
    June 13 - comparison between real and theoretical diesel cycles
    June 12 - angular momentum, moment of inertia
    June 11 - design features of a flywheel
    June 10- description of theoretical petrol cycle (otto)

    Probably gonna swing back to engines, which i dont mind.
    Hope its an easy comparison
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    (Original post by johnh545)
    you dont use the masses.
    You calculate the energy released using the change in binding energy.
    Seeing as the neutrons are already free, they don't have any binding energy
    But isn't the reason that the atom disintegrates that it has absorbed the neutron? So it wouldn't really be a free neutron, since it becomes part of the nucleus an instant before the new nucleus disintegrates...

    I don't understand
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    June 13 question 1cii, do the four hydrogen atoms not have one electron each? Why aren't these electrons added to the mass of the protons?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Me123456789)
    Thanks, but how would I do that for this question? (part c ii)

    A typical fission reaction in the reactor is represented by

    1 (c) (i) Calculate the number of neutrons, x.
    answer = 4.neutrons
    (1 mark)

    1 (c) (ii) Calculate the energy released, in MeV, in the fission reaction above.

    mass of neutron = 1.00867 u
    mass of 233 92U nucleus = 232.98915 u
    mass of 91 36Kr nucleus = 90.90368 u
    mass of 139 56Ba nucleus = 138.87810 u

    You don't need to know any mass defect. They've given you the mass before the reaction and after the reactions.

    Total mass before - Total mass after , and you'll get a small value of 0. something (u)

    times that value by 931.5 to get the energy released in MeV
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    (Original post by Star Light)
    I'm thinking we might get a six-marker about the eye, there hasn't been one on the current spec papers so far. For example, explain for a light ray enters the eye, and how it gets received by the brain. Or maybe something about different vision defects, causes and how to fix?

    Might be one about comparing some scan types, but they tend to be 2-4 markers really.
    Could be one about surgery - endoscopes + why is laparoscopic surgery good, that hasn't featured at all really so far.

    If only they'd give us 'Describe the events in one heart beat' again like in 2014!
    Yes true, I agree with the eye one - but I don't think we need to know much about how light ray get received by the brain? Also what would you say about endoscope + laparoscopic? I am thinking more of an X-ray question!
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    (Original post by samlyon)
    June 13 question 1cii, do the four hydrogen atoms not have one electron each? Why aren't these electrons added to the mass of the protons?

    Thanks
    Mass of an electron is insignificant compared to the mass of a proton (10^4 bigger)??

    I don't think it would make much difference, Hydrogen atoms are equivalent to protons anyway

    Think of it like 1000kg is the mass of blob A and 1kg is the mass of blob B, the mass of blob B doesn't really add that much to the total mass really
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    Ok. I posted basically the same thing back on page 50 but 2b(ii) here: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...A-QP-JUN12.PDF (June 2012 astro)
    http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...W-MS-JUN12.PDF (markscheme)

    It doesn't multiply the answer by two afterwards even though it says it's an orbital radius. Any reason why?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by DCMed96)
    Thanks for the quick response!!!

    Anyone guess what will be on this year's six marker? (what can be the hardest thing they can throw on us) considering we are all gonna do the R place instead thanks to the lost van.....

    Anyone doing med phy as well>
    i'm doing med phy!! what do you think the 6marker would be on?
 
 
 
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