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AQA Physics PHYA5 - Thursday 18th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    (Original post by Lau14)
    No sorry, I don't really use any :/
    Ah that's okay! I really feel like it helped last year. Could have just helped me procrastinate though too :L


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Ah brilliant, thanks!


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    You're welcome, I hope you find it useful.
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    (Original post by CD223)
    Ah that's okay! I really feel like it helped last year. Could have just helped me procrastinate though too :L


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    I'll admit to not doing much revision at all last year! But I mostly go for reading and memorising things that way, it works pretty well for me
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    (Original post by Disney0702)
    You're welcome, I hope you find it useful.
    Thank you, that's very kind of you How are you finding physics?


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Thank you, that's very kind of you How are you finding physics?


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    You're welcome

    So far I don't think it is too difficult. The concepts in Turning Points are not hard to grasp ... YET

    What about you?
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    (Original post by Disney0702)
    You're welcome

    So far I don't think it is too difficult. The concepts in Turning Points are not hard to grasp ... YET

    What about you?
    Ah me too. A lot of it is okay to understand but applying it to exam questions is another story!

    Ah right! Astro seems to be starting off okay with lenses but I'm sure it gets harder by the look of the formulae sheet!


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    Have you done the isa practical and or exam yet?
    If so would you mind giving me some tips of the questions and what the experiment is about.
    Thanks!


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    (Original post by thirushi95)
    Have you done the isa practical and or exam yet?
    If so would you mind giving me some tips of the questions and what the experiment is about.
    Thanks!


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    I'm doing the EMPA (scheme 6X) unfortunately. Sorry.


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Ah me too. A lot of it is okay to understand but applying it to exam questions is another story!

    Ah right! Astro seems to be starting off okay with lenses but I'm sure it gets harder by the look of the formulae sheet!


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    Ah I still haven't looked at the Turning Points examination questions.

    Yes I believe that Turning Points will get slightly more difficult as we go along because it'll delve into wave-particle duality and that was something I hated learning at AS.
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    (Original post by Disney0702)
    Ah I still haven't looked at the Turning Points examination questions.

    Yes I believe that Turning Points will get slightly more difficult as we go along because it'll delve into wave-particle duality and that was something I hated learning at AS.
    Ah I haven't looked at Astro exam questions either so don't worry.

    That stuff was interesting, albeit fairly complicated to understand at AS aha.


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    Has anyone done section A of the AQA A2 Physics A Empa? Has anyone got theirs tomorrow? Task one or two
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    (Original post by sm1297)
    Has anyone done section A of the AQA A2 Physics A Empa? Has anyone got theirs tomorrow? Task one or two
    If it helps, my mocks were both on capacitance and pendulums. But that may have no relation to the real thing.


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    for the radioactivity topic how much do we have to know about elements?
    as ive been doing some old past papers and some questions come up such as give the equation for .. is converted into an isotope of .... i can do some by knowledge of alpha/beta etc if they tell me that but sometimes i don't know the name of the element its been converted into and they ask for that... are there a certain few I'm supposed to know? thanks
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    (Original post by imyimy)
    for the radioactivity topic how much do we have to know about elements?
    as ive been doing some old past papers and some questions come up such as give the equation for .. is converted into an isotope of .... i can do some by knowledge of alpha/beta etc if they tell me that but sometimes i don't know the name of the element its been converted into and they ask for that... are there a certain few I'm supposed to know? thanks
    It should give you the element and chemical symbol. We aren't expected to remember any elements. Sometimes I guess in those scenarios there would be a diagram of the periodic table either as an insert or on the paper itself.

    It's unrealistic to expect us to complete those questions without telling us in the main question or providing the periodic table.


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    (Original post by CD223)
    It should give you the element and chemical symbol. We aren't expected to remember any elements. Sometimes I guess in those scenarios there would be a diagram of the periodic table either as an insert or on the paper itself.

    It's unrealistic to expect us to complete those questions without telling us in the main question or providing the periodic table.


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    yeah i thought that, thanks, maybe in these old papers they got a periodic table
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    Does anyone have any tips for revising for this exam? I feel like I don't know anything and I've being reading the text book but it just doesn't seem to go in. Anyone got any tips?
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    (Original post by _Caz_)
    Does anyone have any tips for revising for this exam? I feel like I don't know anything and I've being reading the text book but it just doesn't seem to go in. Anyone got any tips?
    Make your own revision notes to read from - writing stuff down and putting the information together right helps it go in and makes sure you understand it. Use the textbook, the specification, your notes from class, the revision guide - all the resources you have. You can use colours and mindmaps etc if you want. It can also be much more portable than a textbook! You can stick them in your college folder to work in your spare time if you wanted, or to help with revision in lessons.

    There are a handful of definititions across PHYA4/PHYA5 that you could use flashcards for (question on the front, answers on the back) because at least one or two usually come up and it's an easy two marks.

    Astrophysics is the biggest topic, so divide revision time up appropriately (the paper doesn't split equally three ways - it's 40 marks thermal and nuclear, 35 marks astro, a six mark question in both halves).

    Learning certain things that have to be memorised can be tricky - like the table of spectral classes etc (can be found in the specification under the astrophysics heading). The "cover and write" type technique from primary school can be pretty useful, and as you start to remember it more you can try writing it out without looking first when you have a spare five minutes and eventually it will sink in properly.

    There aren't many past papers, so use them carefully but definitely do them! Because there are so few, if timing is likely to be an issue time it and then continue in a different coloured pen when the time is up so you can see which are problems from knowledge and which are from timing. Once you're done making notes etc, maybe do a bit of work with them and then sit down to do a paper. You might surprise yourself with how much you know!

    Important tips for any subject: revise regularly for short periods of time, take breaks, get decent sleep
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    (Original post by imyimy)
    yeah i thought that, thanks, maybe in these old papers they got a periodic table
    I assume so! It seems a bit unreasonable not to provide one!


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    (Original post by Lau14)
    Make your own revision notes to read from - writing stuff down and putting the information together right helps it go in and makes sure you understand it. Use the textbook, the specification, your notes from class, the revision guide - all the resources you have. You can use colours and mindmaps etc if you want. It can also be much more portable than a textbook! You can stick them in your college folder to work in your spare time if you wanted, or to help with revision in lessons.

    There are a handful of definititions across PHYA4/PHYA5 that you could use flashcards for (question on the front, answers on the back) because at least one or two usually come up and it's an easy two marks.

    Astrophysics is the biggest topic, so divide revision time up appropriately (the paper doesn't split equally three ways - it's 40 marks thermal and nuclear, 35 marks astro, a six mark question in both halves).

    Learning certain things that have to be memorised can be tricky - like the table of spectral classes etc (can be found in the specification under the astrophysics heading). The "cover and write" type technique from primary school can be pretty useful, and as you start to remember it more you can try writing it out without looking first when you have a spare five minutes and eventually it will sink in properly.

    There aren't many past papers, so use them carefully but definitely do them! Because there are so few, if timing is likely to be an issue time it and then continue in a different coloured pen when the time is up so you can see which are problems from knowledge and which are from timing. Once you're done making notes etc, maybe do a bit of work with them and then sit down to do a paper. You might surprise yourself with how much you know!

    Important tips for any subject: revise regularly for short periods of time, take breaks, get decent sleep
    Might have to add this to the first post if you don't mind when I'm tidying up these threads this weekend!


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    (Original post by Lau14)
    Make your own revision notes to read from - writing stuff down and putting the information together right helps it go in and makes sure you understand it. Use the textbook, the specification, your notes from class, the revision guide - all the resources you have. You can use colours and mindmaps etc if you want. It can also be much more portable than a textbook! You can stick them in your college folder to work in your spare time if you wanted, or to help with revision in lessons.

    There are a handful of definititions across PHYA4/PHYA5 that you could use flashcards for (question on the front, answers on the back) because at least one or two usually come up and it's an easy two marks.

    Astrophysics is the biggest topic, so divide revision time up appropriately (the paper doesn't split equally three ways - it's 40 marks thermal and nuclear, 35 marks astro, a six mark question in both halves).

    Learning certain things that have to be memorised can be tricky - like the table of spectral classes etc (can be found in the specification under the astrophysics heading). The "cover and write" type technique from primary school can be pretty useful, and as you start to remember it more you can try writing it out without looking first when you have a spare five minutes and eventually it will sink in properly.

    There aren't many past papers, so use them carefully but definitely do them! Because there are so few, if timing is likely to be an issue time it and then continue in a different coloured pen when the time is up so you can see which are problems from knowledge and which are from timing. Once you're done making notes etc, maybe do a bit of work with them and then sit down to do a paper. You might surprise yourself with how much you know!

    Important tips for any subject: revise regularly for short periods of time, take breaks, get decent sleep
    Thank you this is really helpful. I have written a lot of unit 5 up (thermal and nuclear). We're not even half way through astrophysics yet so I'm not sure how that's going to go in the end :L Writing notes down does help. It's just a little difficult right because I have RSI so writing really hurts at the moment. I'm working on becoming ambidextrous but obviously that's not really great. I might try making some notes on the computer instead as that hurts less than writing

    Thanks again for your advice
 
 
 
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