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AQA Physics PHYA5 - Thursday 18th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    (Original post by Amanzz)
    Yeah, I did have a browse! I feel good about PHYA4, I can do most of it really well I think, except electric fields. It's odd, I almost always get 90% of the marks on the electric fields part, but I still feel like I know nothing about them???? I'm from Cardiff, so it's WJEC for me🔫 I think my teacher has, but only he's allowed on? Is that normal or does your teacher share it with you?
    I completely agree, up until I found out there was no Turning Points it was the best book ever!
    So it's not that pushed for time then? That's okay. I really love physics anyway so I've read a few books that cover most of turning points for the written parts, all that will be new is putting the maths to it!


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    I kinda understand that. It's a difficult unit. Apparently 25% of people in my college fail it lol.

    My teacher only shares the lesson power points so we don't have access to exampro unfortunately.

    Yeah turning points looks like some was covered at AS. Astro covered GCSE lenses again, as well as stuff on Doppler shifts and stuff. There's still a lot of content to learn which is new though.


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    (Original post by sykik)
    Hopefully an A... But i have a feeling EMPA will let me down. Any tips for that like how to revise and stuff?
    Me too!

    It's hard to say with the empa. I'd say do past papers to look at generally what they have asked about experiments before and how you could answer the same questions on the experiments you did.


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    (Original post by CreamyRoss)
    Not sure if it's already been mentioned but what do people think might come up as the 6 marker for astro? Having done most of the past papers the six markers have been atrocious in all but one.


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    I'm not sure. I would say telescopes but they could throw in stuff on life cycles of stars. Essentially any topic that you can pick more than 6 points about :/.


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    Also guys, I wasn't the only one who appeared to notice the distinct lack of thermal physics problems, however in the physics B unit 4 papers there are a few odd specific heat capacity questions. Just open them all up as pdf's and hit "ctrl and F" and type in "specific" and all the heat capacity stuff comes up. There aren't an abundance but it's better than none. Happy revising
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    (Original post by Amanzz)
    Also guys, I wasn't the only one who appeared to notice the distinct lack of thermal physics problems, however in the physics B unit 4 papers there are a few odd specific heat capacity questions. Just open them all up as pdf's and hit "ctrl and F" and type in "specific" and all the heat capacity stuff comes up. There aren't an abundance but it's better than none. Happy revising
    Thermal physics seems like more of an ISA/EMPA type question to ask. I did a mock EMPA the other day on it haha!


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    (Original post by CD223)
    I'm not sure. I would say telescopes but they could throw in stuff on life cycles of stars. Essentially any topic that you can pick more than 6 points about :/.


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    It could be anything really, I think they're the toughest parts of the exam. Something in life cycles on stars would be a godsend though!


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    (Original post by CreamyRoss)
    It could be anything really, I think they're the toughest parts of the exam. Something in life cycles on stars would be a godsend though!


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    Yeah life cycle would be nice they could make it abstract and ask you to do Ray diagrams on telescopes?


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Yeah life cycle would be nice they could make it abstract and ask you to do Ray diagrams on telescopes?


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    I don't think they could because the written communication mark couldn't apply then?
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    (Original post by Lau14)
    I don't think they could because the written communication mark couldn't apply then?
    It may be possible. Last years PHYA1 QWC asked for a diagram for a thermistor, and the other QWC for PHYA2 was...I think stress strain which required a diagram and graphs? I don't remember them exactly.


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    (Original post by Amanzz)
    It may be possible. Last years PHYA1 QWC asked for a diagram for a thermistor, and the other QWC for PHYA2 was...I think stress strain which required a diagram and graphs? I don't remember them exactly.


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    Yeah one or two diagrams within the writing might be necessary/useful, but you couldn't have a whole question based around drawing ray diagrams and I can't think of how they'd really link it in nicely to a long writing one? Seeing as you usually get three marks for drawing a telescope one then that's already half the marks on that.
    From what I remember last years PHYA1 was on electricity yeah, and involved explaining why a variable resistor was necessary in a circuit and some other bits. Don't remember having to draw a diagram though but that's probably just my memory
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    (Original post by Lau14)
    I don't think they could because the written communication mark couldn't apply then?
    Idk. Wasn't sure if written communication just meant how well you convey your thoughts, be it diagrams or text haha.


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Idk. Wasn't sure if written communication just meant how well you convey your thoughts, be it diagrams or text haha.


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    On the markschemes it usually says something like "The candidate's writing should be legible and the spelling, punctuation and grammar should be sufficiently accurate for the meaning to be clear.", as far as I can tell it's definitely about how well you can write a longer answer using proper paragraphs and spelling things (particularly relevant terms) etc.
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    (Original post by Lau14)
    On the markschemes it usually says something like "The candidate's writing should be legible and the spelling, punctuation and grammar should be sufficiently accurate for the meaning to be clear.", as far as I can tell it's definitely about how well you can write a longer answer using proper paragraphs and spelling things (particularly relevant terms) etc.
    Ah I guess that would make sense then. Possible advantages of reflecting telescopes over refracting telescopes? Uses of lenses? CCDs? There are several topics that could make up a six marker on telescopes I think.


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Ah I guess that would make sense then. Possible advantages of reflecting telescopes over refracting telescopes? Uses of lenses? CCDs? There are several topics that could make up a six marker on telescopes I think.


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    There are definitely a lot of possible six markers in the astro section, comes with the amount of content! Yeah comparisons of telescopes/structures of etc. including at different points on the EM spectrum (that was actually a question I think), how a CCD works has been asked I think but a while ago so still possible for a repeat, life cycle of star stuff has a lot of chances for six markers, H balmer lines, evidence for the big bang is pretty nice but that was on last year's paper so unlikely that we'll see that again (although nothing is impossible)!
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    (Original post by Lau14)
    There are definitely a lot of possible six markers in the astro section, comes with the amount of content! Yeah comparisons of telescopes/structures of etc. including at different points on the EM spectrum (that was actually a question I think), how a CCD works has been asked I think but a while ago so still possible for a repeat, life cycle of star stuff has a lot of chances for six markers, H balmer lines, evidence for the big bang is pretty nice but that was on last year's paper so unlikely that we'll see that again (although nothing is impossible)!
    Sorry, but could you help me understand what the Balmer series is?

    I've heard it has something to do with Hydrogen being in its n=2 state.


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    Hey guys!

    I've been doing some radioactive questions for revision and I got stuck on one of them and I would like to ask for help.

    Q7b)ii) in the following link.

    And here's the mark scheme to see if you get the right answer.

    Thanks
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    Does anyone know why U-235 has a longer half life than Pu-239?
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    (Original post by CD223)
    Sorry, but could you help me understand what the Balmer series is?

    I've heard it has something to do with Hydrogen being in its n=2 state.


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    There is a bit on it in my notes, can't remember how in depth it is though. They're pretty important, but I'm guessing you haven't covered them yet then?

    So hydrogen in the outer layers of a star can have electrons in the n=2 state. They are then excited by radiation/light emitted by the star to a higher level, and then drop back down to n=2, emitting a photon (same as the process we learnt at AS, just a specific example of it). As electron levels are at specific energies, the photons emitted have specific discrete energies/wavelengths. Before, all the light is travelling towards the observer, but when it's emitted from the H atoms it goes in every direction, so black lines show up on the spectra due to these specific energy photons. This is the Balmer series. Intensity of the lines is dependent on the temperature of a star - cool stars are unlikely to have/will have very faint Balmer lines as the electrons don't have enough energy and are more likely to be in the n=1 state. In really hot stars, they have too much energy and are more likely to be in n=3 or above. In between you get strong Balmer lines due to hydrogen.
    In that table of spectral classes etc the last column shows what elements give strong absorption lines for each temperature range of stars
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    (Original post by Lau14)
    There is a bit on it in my notes, can't remember how in depth it is though. They're pretty important, but I'm guessing you haven't covered them yet then?

    So hydrogen in the outer layers of a star can have electrons in the n=2 state. They are then excited by radiation/light emitted by the star to a higher level, and then drop back down to n=2, emitting a photon (same as the process we learnt at AS, just a specific example of it). As electron levels are at specific energies, the photons emitted have specific discrete energies/wavelengths. Before, all the light is travelling towards the observer, but when it's emitted from the H atoms it goes in every direction, so black lines show up on the spectra due to these specific energy photons. This is the Balmer series. Intensity of the lines is dependent on the temperature of a star - cool stars are unlikely to have/will have very faint Balmer lines as the electrons don't have enough energy and are more likely to be in the n=1 state. In really hot stars, they have too much energy and are more likely to be in n=3 or above. In between you get strong Balmer lines due to hydrogen.
    In that table of spectral classes etc the last column shows what elements give strong absorption lines for each temperature range of stars
    We skimmed over them very briefly last term :/ not enough for me to understand though!

    Oh okay - thanks very much for the detailed explanation!


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    Did anyone else find this years a2 empa particularly difficult?
 
 
 
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