Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now

AQA Physics PHYA5 - Thursday 18th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    Oh I see. What option is it? (Not Astro I'm assuming given the mention of Einstein).

    No worries!

    Have you done many past papers?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Nope, that was my first one actually, and I'm doing Turning points #e=mc^2
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    Seems harsh for FP1 and C3 to be on the same day...


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yeah exam boards don't worry about overlap! And loads of people in our college have that clash because it's anyone taking further maths and resitting core 3 and everyone who takes AS further maths because that is done alongside A2 maths. It's not so bad though, they're two of my easiest exams.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cosmocos)
    Nope, that was my first one actually, and I'm doing Turning points #e=mc^2
    First for PHYA5 or both units?

    Sounds an interesting chapter. I felt we were cheated a bit learning the E=mc^2 equation in the binding energy topic but not delving into its implications enough.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lau14)
    Yeah exam boards don't worry about overlap! And loads of people in our college have that clash because it's anyone taking further maths and resitting core 3 and everyone who takes AS further maths because that is done alongside A2 maths. It's not so bad though, they're two of my easiest exams.
    Aha, I really should have done AS or A2 Further Maths. If I was to look at some topics over summer to help prepare me for uni, what resources would you recommend?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hello! For the medical physics paper, which one should I use in exam, heart nerve goes from -80mV to +40mV or -70mV to + 30mV? It states both in CGP book!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hexaneandheels)
    Hello! For the medical physics paper, which one should I use in exam, heart nerve goes from -80mV to +40mV or -70mV to + 30mV? It states both in CGP book!
    Hello there! You're the first person I've seen doing Medical Physics on the thread as far as I know - hopefully someone can pick you up on that! What does the AQA course notes say? I'd trust them more.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hexaneandheels)
    Hello! For the medical physics paper, which one should I use in exam, heart nerve goes from -80mV to +40mV or -70mV to + 30mV? It states both in CGP book!
    I usually use the 70mv/30mv ive only cone across one question using the 80mV/40mV one

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I've got the PHYA5 June 2014 paper tomorrow. Anyone had this as their mock yet? Wondered the relative difficulty to previous years.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you do you have any idea what the difference is and why they have included two sets of values?

    (Original post by Mai.H)
    I usually use the 70mv/30mv ive only cone across one question using the 80mV/40mV one

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Turning points question. We have finally started it (and plugged through cathode rays, Millikan's oil drop and the alternative method for the charge on an electron, just on through to light and waves).
    I'm curious as to what this means on the teacher's notes for it...
    "why the detector signal changes in strength whenthe detector is rotated about the line between the transmitter and the detector in a plane perpendicular to this line." in relation to Hertz and radio waves

    Cheers
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hexaneandheels)
    Thank you do you have any idea what the difference is and why they have included two sets of values?
    The 80 one is the action potential of the heart and the 70 one is the action potential of a neuron. The spec requires you to know in depth about the action potential of a neuron. I think they include the heart one so you know whats happening with ecgs and things?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    Aha, I really should have done AS or A2 Further Maths. If I was to look at some topics over summer to help prepare me for uni, what resources would you recommend?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    For FP2-4, google it (eg aqa fp3) and the official AQA textbook for that unit will come up as a free pdf. I don't think you need any knowledge from other further units to do them (eg you can do FP3 without FP1 or 2), but they assume knowledge of all core A level maths (except for FP1). FP3 in particular can involve lots of different integration and differentiation techniques!
    I guess you can look at what's relevant to you for which topics you study as you aren't sitting any exams.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lau14)
    For FP2-4, google it (eg aqa fp3) and the official AQA textbook for that unit will come up as a free pdf. I don't think you need any knowledge from other further units to do them (eg you can do FP3 without FP1 or 2), but they assume knowledge of all core A level maths (except for FP1). FP3 in particular can involve lots of different integration and differentiation techniques!
    I guess you can look at what's relevant to you for which topics you study as you aren't sitting any exams.

    Thank you! I will do that over summer at some point, but I won;t get too stressed over it as I wanna relax and will be taught from scratch in September anyway
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    Thank you! I will do that over summer at some point, but I won;t get too stressed over it as I wanna relax and will be taught from scratch in September anyway
    Yeah, worth doing some reading maybe but definitely not worth getting worked up about! We've done all that for A levels so we'll have earnt a few months of mostly relaxing
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lau14)
    Yeah, worth doing some reading maybe but definitely not worth getting worked up about! We've done all that for A levels so we'll have earnt a few months of mostly relaxing
    True!

    Do you know why they call the "maximum" resolving power the smallest value of \theta? It's so illogical, I'm always tricked into using the larger value of \lambda haha
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    True!

    Do you know why they call the "maximum" resolving power the smallest value of \theta? It's so illogical, I'm always tricked into using the larger value of \lambda haha
    The maximum resolving power is when \theta is smaller because that shows the smallest angle of separation that can be resolved - if the angle is smaller, you can see things that are closer together, so you can resolve more things, therefore maximum! It is a little confusing, similar to how the best time in a race is the smallest one.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    First for PHYA5 or both units?

    Sounds an interesting chapter. I felt we were cheated a bit learning the E=mc^2 equation in the binding energy topic but not delving into its implications enough.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yeah Totally! I changed from medical physics after realising that there's less to absorb with turning points. And I was talking about the section B of PHYA5

    [tex]Never realised I could type like this[tex]
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lau14)
    The maximum resolving power is when \theta is smaller because that shows the smallest angle of separation that can be resolved - if the angle is smaller, you can see things that are closer together, so you can resolve more things, therefore maximum! It is a little confusing, similar to how the best time in a race is the smallest one.
    Yeah, I see that. It's just the language. You wouldn't describe the maximum time in a race to be the smallest time would you

    So counter-intuitive in this option I swear. Magnitudes of luminosity are just as silly.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cosmocos)
    Yeah Totally! I changed from medical physics after realising that there's less to absorb with turning points. And I was talking about the section B of PHYA5

    [tex]Never realised I could type like this[tex]
    Haha that's cool!

    Might wanna add a "/" at the beginning of the second set of square brackets though

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CD223)
    Yeah, I see that. It's just the language. You wouldn't describe the maximum time in a race to be the smallest time would you

    So counter-intuitive in this option I swear. Magnitudes of luminosity are just as silly.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yeah it's not the easiest to get your head around sometimes!Magnitude is just a logarithmic scale, although I guess not the nicest one!
 
 
 
Poll
If you won £30,000, which of these would you spend it on?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.