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AQA Physics PHYA5 - Thursday 18th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    (Original post by Master Sam)
    Thank youu
    No problem! Does that make sense now? are you leaving PHYA5 revision until after PHYA4?


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    I find the nuclear and thermal section quite easy, so I don't have to revise much for it. Turning points, however, is such a ball ache even though half of it is AS. The wording is so picky and almost all of it is learning mark scheme stuff, which I find extremely dull.
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    Hello, does anyone have the solutions to the 3 chapters from the AQA Turning points pdf's? I would really appreciate it
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    (Original post by Protoxylic)
    I find the nuclear and thermal section quite easy, so I don't have to revise much for it. Turning points, however, is such a ball ache even though half of it is AS. The wording is so picky and almost all of it is learning mark scheme stuff, which I find extremely dull.
    For turning points do we need to know pretty much all the experiments mentioned in the official book and in the skinny CGP book?

    The grade boundaries are so low (19/35 for an A) but it has to do with what you said; the examiners being waaaaay too picky for their choice of words.
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    (Original post by Paul Dirac)
    Hello, does anyone have the solutions to the 3 chapters from the AQA Turning points pdf's? I would really appreciate it
    Do you mean solutions to the summary questions?


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    (Original post by Protoxylic)
    I find the nuclear and thermal section quite easy, so I don't have to revise much for it. Turning points, however, is such a ball ache even though half of it is AS. The wording is so picky and almost all of it is learning mark scheme stuff, which I find extremely dull.
    It was until last year, then the questions where a bit different to what they usually give us


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    (Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
    Do you mean solutions to the summary questions?


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    Yes please!
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    (Original post by Paul Dirac)
    Yes please!
    Unfortunately there are no solutions to those questions apart from the answers given at the end of chapter 3. Have you seen those?


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    Seems that last year's PHYA5 boundaries were an anomaly.


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    any predictions for the 6 marker??
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    Has anyone got a good way or remembering the difference between v and v0 l and l0 etc for special relativity


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    (Original post by runningoutoftime)
    any predictions for the 6 marker??
    They've never asked about kinetic theory so that could be a possibility. Maybe another one on nuclear fission (I wish)


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    (Original post by gcsestuff)
    They've never asked about kinetic theory so that could be a possibility. Maybe another one on nuclear fission (I wish)


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    I was thinking that.


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    (Original post by CD223)
    I was thinking that.


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    Neither have they done one any sort of thermal physics. Potentially an experiment question.

    My physics teacher said that they have really exhausted thermal and gas 6 markers though and he couldn't really think of any others.

    I really want a nuclear reactor question. It's my favourite part of all of the syllabus


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    Feel like I haven't gone over PHYA5 in ages. I'll get back into it when PHYA4 is over haha.


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    Hey guys,

    Was wondering if anyone has a fool proof way of deriving the kinetic theory equation for unit 5? I have looked at a lot of different sources and ways of doing it but I'm really still unsure of how to do it. I could just memorise it but I'd rather have an understanding of it in case they ask a question on it in the exam, which I guess could be pretty likely since they hardly ever ask questions on deriving this equation even though it's part of the spec.

    Thanks in advance for any replies!
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    Can someone explain electron diffraction to find the size of the nucleus I just don't get it at akk


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    (Original post by gcsestuff)
    Can someone explain electron diffraction to find the size of the nucleus I just don't get it at akk


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    Electron diffraction makes use of the wave like properties of electrons. From AS you might remember working out the debroglie wavelength of electrons. Well when the electron is fired at high speed the debroglie wavelength is just the right size for the electron to diffract through the nucleus. Then you get a diffraction pattern that is concentric circles of maxima and minima. This the distance to the first minima can be measured to work out the angle of diffraction. The angle of diffraction for each different radius size is different. It is in accordance with the equation Rsinx=0.61*debroglie wavelength

    Where r is nuclear radius
    X is angle to first minima

    I'm not sure if this helps you at all.


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    (Original post by _Caz_)
    Electron diffraction makes use of the wave like properties of electrons. From AS you might remember working out the debroglie wavelength of electrons. Well when the electron is fired at high speed the debroglie wavelength is just the right size for the electron to diffract through the nucleus. Then you get a diffraction pattern that is concentric circles of maxima and minima. This the distance to the first minima can be measured to work out the angle of diffraction. The angle of diffraction for each different radius size is different. It is in accordance with the equation Rsinx=0.61*debroglie wavelength

    Where r is nuclear radius
    X is angle to first minima

    I'm not sure if this helps you at all.


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    Do we ever need to use that formula? Never seen it in a paper :/


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Do we ever need to use that formula? Never seen it in a paper :/


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    Not sure. I might just keep it in the back of my mind just in case. It was in the text book so it might be worth knowing.
 
 
 
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