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    Hello,

    I am in the whole application process and was originally interested in auditing however now I've had a look at forensic accounting too. I am stuck between whether to apply for auditing or forensics. I was wondering if you could please give me advice in terms of which you think will be more interesting, has a good future scope and salary terms?

    Thank you in advance!! =)
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    Forensic accountants are used when something has gone wrong and evidence needs to be gathered for use in court - a lot of forensic accounting work comes from law firms that don't have the in house capacity to conduct accountancy investigations. Forensic accounting work can vary a lot, and the work is non-recurring so you can't know quite what you are going to get. A classic piece of work in forensic accounting work is when a company acquires another company - and they agree terms for a deal, such as price, but also things like warranties and indemnities. When a deal is agreed it usually takes a few months until the acquisition is completed. During this time, the target company may have broken some of the terms of the agreement. Forensic accountants are often brought in at this stage to agree and damages that need to be paid. Forensic accountants also work in the areas of fraud and financial crime. They also work on trying to find out what assets somebody owns, such as in the case of divorces. They will also engage in corporate detective work, such as sifting through emails and evidence.

    Auditing is probably the safer bet for career development, the market for forensic accounting work isn't as deep, predictable, and often people aren't willing to pay massive fees because the work is typically cleaning up a mess rather than adding value.

    In terms of applying to grad schemes, PwC offer a split scheme between auditing and forensic accounting. Once you've qualified you can choose which area to specialise in. This is a great scheme because you'll get more experience and be able to make an informed decision as to what you want to specialise in.
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    (Original post by Classical Liberal)
    Forensic accountants are used when something has gone wrong and evidence needs to be gathered for use in court - a lot of forensic accounting work comes from law firms that don't have the in house capacity to conduct accountancy investigations. Forensic accounting work can vary a lot, and the work is non-recurring so you can't know quite what you are going to get. A classic piece of work in forensic accounting work is when a company acquires another company - and they agree terms for a deal, such as price, but also things like warranties and indemnities. When a deal is agreed it usually takes a few months until the acquisition is completed. During this time, the target company may have broken some of the terms of the agreement. Forensic accountants are often brought in at this stage to agree and damages that need to be paid. Forensic accountants also work in the areas of fraud and financial crime. They also work on trying to find out what assets somebody owns, such as in the case of divorces. They will also engage in corporate detective work, such as sifting through emails and evidence.

    Auditing is probably the safer bet for career development, the market for forensic accounting work isn't as deep, predictable, and often people aren't willing to pay massive fees because the work is typically cleaning up a mess rather than adding value.

    In terms of applying to grad schemes, PwC offer a split scheme between auditing and forensic accounting. Once you've qualified you can choose which area to specialise in. This is a great scheme because you'll get more experience and be able to make an informed decision as to what you want to specialise in.
    Thank you so much for your detailed reply. I really appreciate it!
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    Hey there, I am wondering the same thing and I was wondering what did you decide in the end.
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    Hi, we have profiles and information on our careers website about both forensic accounting and audit if you wanted to have a look -www.icaew.com/careers
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    (Original post by Skilled)
    Hello,

    I am in the whole application process and was originally interested in auditing however now I've had a look at forensic accounting too. I am stuck between whether to apply for auditing or forensics. I was wondering if you could please give me advice in terms of which you think will be more interesting, has a good future scope and salary terms?

    Thank you in advance!! =)
    Forensic accounting is the major tool in uncovering and prosecuting fraud in the not for profit mess permitted to develop by congress, par for the course given the law of unintended consequences. So if you are a truth seeker and a crime buster, this might be your choice. Also, TV stations are increasingly trying to boost ratings by employing investigative reporters in busting local government corruption and fraud but the reporters are often not trained forensic fraud examiners. I'm a painter who had to get into the anti corruption biz so my answer is adjusted by this fact.
 
 
 
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