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Mumbling Watch

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    Does anyone else do this. I've done it my whole life. If I try not to I can easily not do it but I often revert back when I am not thinking about it. I tried looking on you tube videos but I might go to an elocution person or speech therapist.
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    Elocution should be taught in schools. Most people could benefit from it.
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    I do sometimes. I've made a conscious effort over the last few years and rarely do it anymore, but I still catch myself mumbling occasionally, particularly if I'm not feeling very confident about what I'm saying.
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    I don't mumble. I literally debate with myself out loud. Not loudly. But out loud nonetheless, but the point is I'm talking sense, not mumbling. Of course I don't feel the need to do that when I'm around others very often...
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    I think there's two kinds of mumbling. There's the one where you're not enunciating yourself properly talking too quietly because you're insecure about what you're saying or insecure in general.

    Then there's type where your brain is working far more quickly than your brain, often perfected by old-world academic types with turtlenecks and tweed jackets with leather patches.
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    (Original post by StretfordEnd)
    I think there's two kinds of mumbling. There's the one where you're not enunciating yourself properly talking too quietly because you're insecure about what you're saying or insecure in general.

    Then there's type where your brain is working far more quickly than your brain, often perfected by old-world academic types with turtlenecks and tweed jackets with leather patches.
    That's a bit silly. People mumble for a huge range of reasons. Some people can speak as quickly as they think but are just naturally soft-spoken. The late Dr David Kelly was a good example of this.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    That's a bit silly. People mumble for a huge range of reasons. Some people can speak as quickly as they think but are just naturally soft-spoken. The late Dr David Kelly was a good example of this.
    And he was very easy to understand. Speaking softly and mumbling are not the same. He wasn't a mumbler.
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    (Original post by StretfordEnd)
    And he was very easy to understand. Speaking softly and mumbling are not the same. He wasn't a mumbler.
    Um, he was a mumbler if there ever was one. During his evidence to Parliament he was repeatedly asked to repeat his evidence because no one could hear what he was saying despite use of a microphone. Are you sure you know who I'm referring to?

    Mumbling is dictionary defined as saying something 'indistinctly and quietly, making it difficult for others to hear'.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    Um, he was a mumbler if there ever was one. During his evidence to Parliament he was repeatedly asked to repeat his evidence because no one could hear what he was saying despite use of a microphone. Are you sure you know who I'm referring to?

    Mumbling is dictionary defined as saying something 'indistinctly and quietly, making it difficult for others to hear'.
    The weapons inspector? In his 'everyday' speech he certainly was no mumbler and I never had a problem understanding what he was saying.

    When he was being grilled by a hostile committee at Parliament with the insinuation that he was essentially a traitor, I would say it was pretty ****ing obvious that he was insecure and uncomfortable at how things were panning out.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    Elocution should be taught in schools. Most people could benefit from it.
    If you find most people difficult to understand it's probably you, not them tbh.
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    (Original post by StretfordEnd)
    The weapons inspector? In his 'everyday' speech he certainly was no mumbler and I never had a problem understanding what he was saying.

    When he was being grilled by a hostile committee at Parliament with the insinuation that he was essentially a traitor, I would say it was pretty ****ing obvious that he was insecure and uncomfortable at how things were panning out.
    Did you know him personally then? I can find no footage of him online and am curious as to where you're getting this impression considering as he was only briefly in the limelight surrounding the Iraq dossier.

    In a transcript of his evidence to the select committee he clarifies the situation for us himself - he believed it had nothing to do with the tone of the conversation:

    Q20 Mr Olner: Dr Kelly, could you speak up, please. The problem is these microphones do not amplify the noise.

    Dr Kelly: I apologise. I have a soft voice, I know.
    http://www.publications.parliament.u...i/uc102502.htm
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    If you find most people difficult to understand it's probably you, not them tbh.
    When did I say I find most people difficult to understand?
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    Mumblers are annoying. I usually just respond with a 'yeah okay mate' and get on with things. Either speak up or don't speak at all.
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    (Original post by Messiah Complex)
    Mumblers are annoying. I usually just respond with a 'yeah okay mate' and get on with things. Either speak up or don't speak at all.
    I don't think it's entirely myth that the quietest are often the ones most worth listening to.
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    Mur. Mur Mur.
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    My parents have only ever complained about me mumbling. If I do it it's only around them because I don't need to make an effort to impress I guess.
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    I mumble a bit I think ... judging by the number of times I've been asked to repeat myself.

    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    I don't think it's entirely myth that the quietest are often the ones most worth listening to.
    If only that were true :blush:
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    I used to get asked to repeat myself a lot. Now people compliment my voice...
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    (Original post by Sir Peter Rabbit)
    If only that were true :blush:
    I didn't say it was always true or true for you. I do think it self-explanatory that louder people will more often be more vain and speak more to attract attention than to contribute meaningfully, for example.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    I didn't say it was always true or true for you.
    Hence the 'if only'.
 
 
 
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