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    Hi

    I am a first year medical student, and I hope to specialise in trauma and orthopaedics surgery in the future. Competition for entry into surgical training schools is fierce. Besides excellent grades and a surgical elective, how else can I increase my chances of being successful in getting into this specialty.

    I have thought about completing a postgraduate diploma in orthopaedics (I am a graduate-entry medical student) during the last couple of years of my degree or during my foundation years training. Will this help my application or will it just be a waste of time and money?

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    (Original post by Rajtantajtan)
    Hi

    I am a first year medical student, and I hope to specialise in trauma and orthopaedics surgery in the future. Competition for entry into surgical training schools is fierce. Besides excellent grades and a surgical elective, how else can I increase my chances of being successful in getting into this specialty.

    I have thought about completing a postgraduate diploma in orthopaedics (I am a graduate-entry medical student) during the last couple of years of my degree or during my foundation years training. Will this help my application or will it just be a waste of time and money?

    Regards
    A
    Probably a bit early now, but when you're in your clinical years approach a friendly consultant and try to get involved in departmental audits, posters, research etc if you can. Look keen and be keen, it'll eventually get you noticed (but be prepared to make sacrifices elsewhere in your personal life).

    In first year - maybe pick an ortho/surgical related SSM?

    Thinking further ahead, I've heard on the grapevine that a PhD is pretty much mandatory to be considered seriously for higher training positions/consultancy.

    When is your ortho attachment? Might be worth waiting til you've done it before you get too committed though, you might end up hating it :p:
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    (Original post by Rajtantajtan)
    Hi

    I am a first year medical student, and I hope to specialise in trauma and orthopaedics surgery in the future. Competition for entry into surgical training schools is fierce. Besides excellent grades and a surgical elective, how else can I increase my chances of being successful in getting into this specialty.

    I have thought about completing a postgraduate diploma in orthopaedics (I am a graduate-entry medical student) during the last couple of years of my degree or during my foundation years training. Will this help my application or will it just be a waste of time and money?

    Regards
    A
    You don't actually have to do much to get into surgery. You just have to have done more than most others. Beefing up your CV and performing well in your interviews is the only guarantee and some of the options include:

    Research (conference presentations, journal publications)
    National Prizes (see this for example - perhaps a little too late to enter)
    Audits
    Intercalation (although I would do something more broad than a diploma in T&O - a more research oriented degree looks better overall)
    Elective
    Doing T&O rotations during medical school and as an F1/F2 job (if possible)
    Attending T&O courses (within reason)

    Do bear in mind that you don't need and probably shouldn't have all of these on your CV for T&O specifically. Whilst showing passion and commitment to a speciality, it is often seen as a negative for students to be so intent on a certain career path so early on. Having a more rounded CV with both medical and surgical work with some of it in T&O will stand you in better stead for the future. I would certainly suggest keeping your options open for now. You never know what you will like as you work your way up.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Thinking further ahead, I've heard on the grapevine that a PhD is pretty much mandatory to be considered seriously for higher training positions/consultancy.
    Not necessarily. It certainly helps but you can do an MD alternatively or if you take a run-through position, just good ol' research will do.
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    Not necessarily. It certainly helps but you can do an MD alternatively or if you take a run-through position, just good ol' research will do.
    Oh cool, I wasn't aware of that - I just remember someone commenting on the irony of orthopods being one of the most academically qualified group of doctors with lots of them having PhDs
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Oh cool, I wasn't aware of that - I just remember someone commenting on the irony of orthopods being one of the most academically qualified group of doctors with lots of them having PhDs
    I did my elective in a centre where more of the T&O consultants had Phds than didn't. Unfortunately in Ortho you move away from the "typical medicine" and hence you begin to look quite poor at the only thing that most in the hospital are good at. Not many people appreciate the knowledge regarding biomechanics and biomaterials possessed by those in the field. You can't really blame them either as you're simply not exposed to it as a student.
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    Thank you very much for the replies everyone. I guess the best thing to do now is to hold on until the later stages of the degree
 
 
 
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