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    Hello everyone.

    I want to join the RAF as an engineering officer but have left ventricular hypertrophy (a heart condition) and regular pains in my chest.
    Will this make me fail my medical even if I'm not going in as aircrew?

    Thanks

    Stefanovitch.
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    No one here is a qualified medical officer. Please consult your AFCO, or ring OASC and speak to the medical officers there.

    I could post about your potential operational effectiveness and how heart mumurs fail the medicals, but you really need to speak to people in the know about something as important as this.
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    Your actually wrong Blackhawk on what you said about heart murmur's. I'm not sure if Steph's heart condition is a murmur but if it causes regular pain you'll need to get it checked out as it could seriously harm your chances. I have a heart murmur but it is benign(very low frequency) which means it cannot harm you and is just an irregular heart beat. It also allows me to apply for aircrew as this is no hindrance for flying duties.

    Good Luck
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    It's probably not. A "Murmur" is a whooshing noise when you listen in certain places with a stethoscope - a problem with the valves in the heart is one of the obvious things that can cause them, or a defect in part of the middle bit acting as a pressure rather than structural valve or a few other obscure things. "Hypertrophy" is more about the muscle of the heart.

    Your decription doesn't make sense to me (but then i haven't done cardiology yet, so welcome any enlightenment! :p: ) - why would a valve have an impact on the regularity of pulse rather than just character? & a problem with a valve that can't potentially harm you? :confused: The only "benign murmur" i've found anything about is when you're in a high output state or a child, where it usually disappears apparently - do you know anymore about yous?

    edited after more looking!
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    What about murmurs associated with VSD et al? That's not valvular...
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    (Original post by Healy9)
    Your actually wrong Blackhawk on what you said about heart murmur's. I'm not sure if Steph's heart condition is a murmur but if it causes regular pain you'll need to get it checked out as it could seriously harm your chances. I have a heart murmur but it is benign(very low frequency) which means it cannot harm you and is just an irregular heart beat. It also allows me to apply for aircrew as this is no hindrance for flying duties.

    Good Luck
    LOL.. How is he wrong? He didn't say anything!
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    (Original post by TonyL)
    How is she wrong?
    [sic]
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    (Original post by Anonystude)
    [sic]

    "DOH!" I did that with threeportdrift as well.

    Idiot I am!
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    To be fair: I think everyone (atleast I did) thought threeportdrift was a man at first! No offence - I'm sure you're not in any way man-like...
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    Sorry for the confusion. I was trying to type in a high pitched voice, honest
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    Well I've just been told that I'm fit for all branches (including pilot which's what I've been offered) even though I've got an grade II innocent heart murmur. I guess it just goes to show that every case really is individual.
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    I was also told by other RAF aircrew in another forum thats as long as its an innocent or a benign mumur everything should be fine.
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    But why would they if a specialist has already diagnosed it as benign. No need.
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    I was TMU at OASC pending further investigation, but since I'd had an echo test at a military hospital they just got them to fax the results to them and had their specialist look at the results. I think that if there's any sign of a murmur no matter how small they'll make you TMU at OASC.
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    Can someone please explain to the stupid medical student what exactly their "benign murmur" is? As i mentioned above I've only found references to 'high output state' (with blood flowing faster than usual, secondary to other pathology) or 'paediatric' causes.
    How did they explain yours to you - just due to weird anatomy in your heart or a physiological high output state due to being superfit or something...?


    But anyhow, ventricular hypertrophy = not exactly a murmur.
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    (Original post by Healy9)
    But why would they if a specialist has already diagnosed it as benign. No need.
    They probably will do if it was a civvy doctor that diagnosed it. In my experience (3 months waiting for medical clearance and counting) the RAF doctors don't always take the civvy doctors' word for it. My problem is an ENT one though; perhaps a heart murmur (or lack of) is more cut and dried.
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    They told me that two of my valves didn't fully close in the way that your lips might not close and let a tiny bit of air out. They said this was happening in my heart and a little blood was flowing through which was the reason for the sound, but it thankfully wont cause me any problems.
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    (Original post by Elles)
    Can someone please explain to the stupid medical student what exactly their "benign murmur" is? As i mentioned above I've only found references to 'high output state' (with blood flowing faster than usual, secondary to other pathology) or 'paediatric' causes.
    How did they explain yours to you - just due to weird anatomy in your heart or a physiological high output state due to being superfit or something...?


    But anyhow, ventricular hypertrophy = not exactly a murmur.
    Indeedy. AIUI, there is no such thing as a truly benign murmur (save for a Still's murmur, which do not persist much beyond the age of 10). Even 'mild' murmurs (for example from congenetal causes - bicuspid aortic valve, small Ventricular Septal Defect, etc.) can go bad...

    Elles - IIRC, ventricular hypertrophy can lead to a 'baggy' bi- or tricuspid valve (depending on whether left or right, obviously!), so you get bi or tricuspid regurge.
 
 
 
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