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    A few months ago I read a book by Kathryn Fox called 'Malicious Intent', in it was a quote - "Cruci Dum Spiro Fido" apparantly/basically meaning "where there's life there's hope".
    I immediatly "fell in love" with this phrase & decided to plan to have a tattoo from it (I already had 2 at this point).
    So I finally got my tattoo last weeek. It's in beautiful scripture on my side.
    My friend then says to me, after seeing the pic on my myspace (she has a GCSE in Latin) that it actually means, "whilst I'm alive I put my faith in the cross" basically.
    Another friend who used to do Latin at school has helped me find out the meaning & he's come to the same conclusion.
    I'm absolutely gutted! I can't believe I've been so stupid as to not check this out before having it inked on my body for ever. I thought that because it was in a book, that it was correct.
    Anyone got some suggestions about this?
    I've included a picture & this:

    cruci: torture, crucify
    dum : while, as long as, until.
    spiro: - spiritus : breath, breathing / life / spirit.
    fido: - fides : trust, confidence, reliance, belief, faith.

    I can definitely see how it could be misinterpreted into this phrase. I understand Latin is a weird language..but yeah... HELP.
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    (Original post by wesetters)
    I'd agree with your friends. As a literal translation.
    I'm cofused as to how you mean literal? I mean, of course I understand what literal means :p: Just not sure, like do you mean there's other ways to see it?
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    (Original post by Katia)
    I'm cofused as to how you mean literal? I mean, of course I understand what literal means :p: Just not sure, like do you mean there's other ways to see it?
    Just looked it up in a Latin dictionary, and I'm pretty sure that 'cruci' comes from 'crux, crucis - a cross'. If it were from the verb to torture/crucify it would have to be 'crucari (to be crucified)' or 'cruciavi (I crucified)'.
    Sorry
    And by a literal translation it may be the case that the phrase you wanted is rendered by a religious phrasing (i.e. taking the word cross to be synonimous with hope). Basically there's no way you can avoid the religious meaning in it.
    By the way I'm not 'fluent' in Latin, have just done an A Level in it
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    And by a literal translation it may be the case that the phrase you wanted is rendered by a religious phrasing (i.e. taking the word cross to be synonimous with hope)
    Maybe that's what it is then? It could be a synonimous phrase..if it is, when 'put' with the:
    dum : while, as long as, until.
    spiro: - spiritus : breath, breathing / life / spirit.
    fido: - fides : trust, confidence, reliance, belief, faith.
    it would make sense.

    What d'ya think?
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    (Original post by Katia)
    Maybe that's what it is then? It could be a synonimous phrase..if it is, when 'put' with the:
    dum : while, as long as, until.
    spiro: - spiritus : breath, breathing / life / spirit.
    fido: - fides : trust, confidence, reliance, belief, faith.
    it would make sense.

    What d'ya think?
    Fido - I trust, rely on
    Literally something like: "As long as I rely on the cross with breath"
    Basically it means "as long as I breathe I have faith in the Cross"
    Could be wrong but this seems the most likely meaning.
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    http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en...iro+Fido&meta=- Sadly it does look like your friends are right.
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    So it seems.
    I am such an idiot.
    Why the hell is it in a book, if it isn't correct. I'm sure it must be right in some context though.. I can see how it could be "turned" into the meaning of 'where there's life there's hope'... I know how silly I sound.
    At least it doesn't mean something like "I sleep with married men" =/

    I guess a positive thing is that my family (dad's side) are Catholic. I was going to get a sacred heart at some point as a "tribute" to my grand parents.
    I guess this is my sacred heart now =/

    STUPID GIRL THAT I AM!
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    (Original post by suuuuuuseh)
    http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en...iro+Fido&meta=- Sadly it does look like your friends are right.
    YAY I was right
    Sorry not about me right now
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    Don't worry about it too much Katia. :hugs: The fact that it isn't obvious to people proficient in Latin means that people normally won't understand what it means. And I suppose it's what it meant to you that matters, so don't give it too much thought.
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    Spiro spero is, literally, I breathe, I hope : as long as there is life, there is hope.
    Cruci dum spiro fido :
    Cruci : from crux, crucis, ablative case I think (my Latin is a bit rusty) : in the cross, to the cross
    dum : whilst
    spiro : I breath
    fido : i trust
    so yes, basically, it means : I trust in the cross as long as I live

    By the way, you can't be fluent in Latin as it is a dead language.
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    (Original post by FrenchGal)
    Spiro spero is, literally, I breathe, I hope : as long as there is life, there is hope.
    Cruci dum spiro fido :
    Cruci : from crux, crucis, ablative case I think (my Latin is a bit rusty) : in the cross, to the cross
    dum : whilst
    spiro : I breath
    fido : i trust
    so yes, basically, it means : I trust in the cross as long as I live

    By the way, you can't be fluent in Latin as it is a dead language.
    The pope is fluent in Latin
    And cruci is dative:cool:
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    (Original post by paddylad)
    The pope is fluent in Latin
    And cruci is dative:cool:
    not even so sure about the Pope :p: And church Latin is not "real" Latin :p: :p: (kidding, I mean it's not "classic" Latin)
    Yeah, dative, you're right, thanks for letting me know. I've not studied Latin in a wee bit more than one year, and I'm getting all rusty. And the weirdest thing is, I miss it !
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    (Original post by FrenchGal)
    not even so sure about the Pope :p: And church Latin is not "real" Latin :p: :p: (kidding, I mean it's not "classic" Latin)
    Yeah, dative, you're right, thanks for letting me know. I've not studied Latin in a wee bit more than one year, and I'm getting all rusty. And the weirdest thing is, I miss it !
    I know, I've just done the A Level in it and thought I'd be glad to be shot of it but I kinda miss it too
    Not the set texts though. Cicero can still rot in hell
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    (Original post by paddylad)
    Cicero can still rot in hell
    He can. With my blessing too.
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    (Original post by FrenchGal)
    He can. With my blessing too.
    :five:
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    I'm a bit late here, but I'm gonna post anyway. I honestly haven't read any of the other posts so that I don't get influenced lol, but this is my take on it:

    The phrase means:

    "While I breath, I trust in the cross."

    Fido- "I trust" takes the dative or ablative.
    Cruci- "[in the] cross" in the ablative.
    Dum- "While"
    Spiro- "I breath"

    The ablative case is a prepositional case, which can be translated into English (without a specific Latin preposition to suggest a clearer idea) as "in/in/with/by/from/out of/down from/etc."

    Thus, the literal transcription is "On the cross while I breath, I trust," but unless this is referring to Christ on the cross (in which case it means literally "while I am breathing [and hanging] on the cross, I trust [in God]"), it is more likely to be "While I breath, I trust in the cross" and a statement of religious faith.
    If it is referring to Christ on the cross, then the idea seems oddly limited in that he only trusts in God while he's on the cross. Thus, I prefer the more generic version: at least in the absence of further context.

    Now I will go and read the other posts
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    Cruci is definitely ablative then ? I've left my Latin grammar in France :p:
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    "Fido" can take either the dative or the ablative, according to my dictionary. I had assumed it was dative at first, but then I realized the potential for the secondary meaning and placed it into the ablative to allow it. The dative and ablative for the adjective "crux, crucis" have the same form.
    The ablative here allows the double meaning of "to trust in/[to hang] on" the cross that I explained above.

    If taken to mean only "While I breath, I trust in the cross" then the dative is by far the better solution.
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    (Original post by Cunning Linguist)
    "Fido" can take either the dative or the ablative, according to my dictionary. I had assumed it was dative at first, but then I realized the potential for the secondary meaning and placed it into the ablative to allow it. The dative and ablative for the adjective "crux, crucis" have the same form.
    The ablative here allows the double meaning of "to trust in/[to hang] on" the cross that I explained above.

    If taken to mean only "While I breath, I trust in the cross" then the dative is by far the better solution.
    Sorry dude, Crux, crucis is feminine and therefore the ablative is 'cruce' not 'cruci'. Only neuter group 3 nouns have the same ending for singular dative and ablative.
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    (Original post by paddylad)
    Sorry dude, Crux, crucis is feminine and therefore the ablative is 'cruce' not 'cruci'. Only neuter group 3 nouns have the same ending for singular dative and ablative.
    Ah, yes. I was actually thinking of the rules for the third declension, single-ending adjectives in "x", rather than the nouns. "Audax, audacis" for instance.

    My dictionary still gives ablative as a possibility for "fido, fidere," but dative is the usual, yes.

    The meaning stands as "While I breath, I trust in the cross." then
 
 
 
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