flibber
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username1560589
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1. Learn and understand the theory completely and then practise applying it to unfamiliar situations.

I can't really help with the others.
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Maffyman
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I done the English Lit exam (WJEC) last year and got a B. I'm now doing A-levels. For this, it really does depend on the day how nice the poem is as some can be easy to interpret, while others are quite difficult. Luckily for me, mine was a easier one.

Before your try and comment on parts of the poem, make sure you have read and understand the poem first. Many people don't do this, and start writing things that have nothing to do with the poem itself. Once you understand it, the lines should be become easier to interpret as you know what is happening. As long as you understand the poem itself, your points make sense and are backed up, then you should be fine.

Some questions to ask yourself when doing this :
Why is the weather like this?
Why do they do this? How does it relate?
What does their clothes represent?
Why does this event take place?

Many things in a poem happen to create atmosphere, if you catch on to these, you should be fine.

Do as many past papers as you can. This will help you with interpreting information.

Good luck!

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flibber
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(Original post by morgan8002)
1. Learn and understand the theory completely and then practise applying it to unfamiliar situations.

I can't really help with the others.
Should I make a list of applications and learn them separately from the theory?


(Original post by Maffyman)
I done the English Lit exam (WJEC) last year and got a B. I'm now doing A-levels. For this, it really does depend on the day how nice the poem is as some can be easy to interpret, while others are quite difficult. Luckily for me, mine was a easier one.

Before your try and comment on parts of the poem, make sure you have read and understand the poem first. Many people don't do this, and start writing things that have nothing to do with the poem itself. Once you understand it, the lines should be become easier to interpret as you know what is happening. As long as you understand the poem itself, your points make sense and are backed up, then you should be fine.

Some questions to ask yourself when doing this :
Why is the weather like this?
Why do they do this? How does it relate?
What does their clothes represent?
Why does this event take place?

Many things in a poem happen to create atmosphere, if you catch on to these, you should be fine.

Do as many past papers as you can. This will help you with interpreting information.

Good luck!

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Thanks

Do I have to comment on specific words and phrases and analyse them, or can I analyse the poem generally?
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username1560589
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(Original post by flibber)
Should I make a list of applications and learn them separately from the theory?
No, because then they can ask you something completely different. Just get used to recognising which parts of the theory you can use where and how to apply the theory to unfamiliar situations.
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flibber
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(Original post by morgan8002)
No, because then they can ask you something completely different. Just get used to recognising which parts of the theory you can use where and how to apply the theory to unfamiliar situations.
Should I use past papers to find out patterns in the answers between different applications of the same theory so I know what to write?
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(Original post by flibber)
Should I use past papers to find out patterns in the answers between different applications of the same theory so I know what to write?
Yes. When you're in the real exam, you need to be able to know what to do when faced with a problem of a kind that you haven't seen before. Practicing these kinds of questions in past papers will help.
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flibber
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(Original post by morgan8002)
Yes. When you're in the real exam, you need to be able to know what to do when faced with a problem of a kind that you haven't seen before. Practicing these kinds of questions in past papers will help.
Thanks

What about the How Science Works and the "suggest" questions?
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(Original post by flibber)
Thanks

What about the How Science Works and the "suggest" questions?
I don't know the specifics of your textbook, so you'll have to decide for yourself.
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(Original post by morgan8002)
I don't know the specifics of your textbook, so you'll have to decide for yourself.
Is your board AQA?
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(Original post by flibber)
Is your board AQA?
I did EdExcel a few years ago, my A-level board is OCR.
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Maffyman
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(Original post by flibber)
Thanks

Do I have to comment on specific words and phrases and analyse them, or can I analyse the poem generally?
You want to comment on specific words and phrases.

Here's three examples:

E.g. 1 - [phrase/word here] creates atmosphere here as......

E.g. 2 - [phrase/word here] suggests the character is....

E.g. 3 - The poet uses the word /phrase [word/phrase here] to represent/show....

Hope this helps!



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flibber
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(Original post by Maffyman)
You want to comment on specific words and phrases.

Here's three examples:

E.g. 1 - [phrase/word here] creates atmosphere here as......

E.g. 2 - [phrase/word here] suggests the character is....

E.g. 3 - The poet uses the word /phrase [word/phrase here] to represent/show....

Hope this helps!



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Is that it?
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Maffyman
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(Original post by flibber)
Is that it?
You may want to give an overview of the poem at the beginning of your answer to show that you understand it (not too long). However, I wouldnt say this is the most important part. So, I wouldn't be too annoyed if I missed this. The parts in which I have mentioned before give you the most and big marks. Follow the structure of PEE (Point, Evidence, Explain) and then you won't go wrong.

Remember, I did a WJEC exam, even though they are usually the same across the boards there will be slight differences. Also, the English Lit exam has had a couple of changes since last year when I done it, however it shouldnt be to different.

To make sure, ask someone on TSR (anyone?) or someone who used the same board as you just to be on the safe side.

Hope this helps
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flibber
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(Original post by Maffyman)
You may want to give an overview of the poem at the beginning of your answer to show that you understand it (not too long). However, I wouldnt say this is the most important part. So, I wouldn't be too annoyed if I missed this. The parts in which I have mentioned before give you the most and big marks. Follow the structure of PEE (Point, Evidence, Explain) and then you won't go wrong.

Remember, I did a WJEC exam, even though they are usually the same across the boards there will be slight differences. Also, the English Lit exam has had a couple of changes since last year when I done it, however it shouldnt be to different.

To make sure, ask someone on TSR (anyone?) or someone who used the same board as you just to be on the safe side.

Hope this helps
Thank you very much!
I know a couple of people on TSR who used the same exam board, but I wouldn't want to bother them. As you are one of only two people who have replied, I shall give you rep.
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Maffyman
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(Original post by flibber)
Thank you very much!
I know a couple of people on TSR who used the same exam board, but I wouldn't want to bother them. As you are one of only two people who have replied, I shall give you rep.
One more thing, make sure when you do past papers, give them in to your teacher to mark, don't mark it yourself. Of course, marking it yourself is a good way of trying to solve your own mistakes, but your teacher is there for a reason and will direct you in the right place. They can give corrections and suggestions for future work and will greatly help you for the actual exam. (I promise you )

If you need any help or have questions, don't hesitate to ask me!

Good luck with your GCSE's! I'm sure you'll ace them.

Matt
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flibber
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(Original post by Maffyman)
One more thing, make sure when you do past papers, give them in to your teacher to mark, don't mark it yourself. Of course, marking it yourself is a good way of trying to solve your own mistakes, but your teacher is there for a reason and will direct you in the right place. They can give corrections and suggestions for future work and will greatly help you for the actual exam. (I promise you )

If you need any help or have questions, don't hesitate to ask me!

Good luck with your GCSE's! I'm sure you'll ace them.

Matt
My teacher says to the class that he doesn't have time to check through everyone's work, but since he and I get on well, I think he might help me anyway.

Thank you very much!
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Maffyman
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(Original post by flibber)
My teacher says to the class that he doesn't have time to check through everyone's work, but since he and I get on well, I think he might help me anyway.

Thank you very much!
If this is the case, go up to him at the beginning or end of the lesson and just ask if he can quickly look over the work. I would make sure to keep asking about your work, as you're GCSE's are quite important and you want to do the best you can. Just make sure you don't nag him. I'm sure you won't, but just a reminder :')

Matt


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OK


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flibber
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(Original post by Plank60)
Don't buy any posh textbooks!
Reading the spec is the way to go!
I call it 'raw revision', textbooks can often stray from what you're actually supposed to learn, even the expensive ones!



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Somebody else (in a different forum) said that the specification should just act as a checklist.
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