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    I have just started a mechanical engineering course and I'm not 100% sure if I have made the right decision. I have always been good at exams but I am finding it very hard to actually remember a lot of stuff long term. I'm just worried that even if I go through it, I would have spend 5 years of my time(meng+placement) and then be clueless at applying what I've actually learned.

    I think that after the 2nd year, when I go onto a placement, I will get motivated as I do just want to feel like I'm doing something useful. Then during 3rd and final year there is more choice to do the topics that interest you.The problem is that If it doesn't, then it will be too late to change my mind.
    I also wasn't expecting that much work in semester 1, I wanted to try so many new things at uni and then realised I just can't fit in more than 1 of them and still have any time to do work. Even during Christmas break, I've got interested in doing some other stuff on offer but probably won't have time for.

    The biggest worry I have though, is that I just don't have an engineer's mind. I found doing orthogonal drawings and 3d sketches extremely hard and somewhat boring. I had trouble staying awake during manufacturing processes lectures ( didn't help they are on a Monday morning). The modules I did enjoy were the maths and the thermodynamics.

    Some of it is just me being lazy, but these constant doubts about my course are making it very hard for me to focus. I have done no revision over Christmas and now will have to cram as much as possible during revision week. Something I haven't really had to do before.

    Has anyone else felt similarly when they started? Did it get better for you?
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    (Original post by kake55)
    I have just started a mechanical engineering course and I'm not 100% sure if I have made the right decision. I have always been good at exams but I am finding it very hard to actually remember a lot of stuff long term. I'm just worried that even if I go through it, I would have spend 5 years of my time(meng+placement) and then be clueless at applying what I've actually learned.

    I think that after the 2nd year, when I go onto a placement, I will get motivated as I do just want to feel like I'm doing something useful. Then during 3rd and final year there is more choice to do the topics that interest you.The problem is that If it doesn't, then it will be too late to change my mind.
    I also wasn't expecting that much work in semester 1, I wanted to try so many new things at uni and then realised I just can't fit in more than 1 of them and still have any time to do work. Even during Christmas break, I've got interested in doing some other stuff on offer but probably won't have time for.

    The biggest worry I have though, is that I just don't have an engineer's mind. I found doing orthogonal drawings and 3d sketches extremely hard and somewhat boring. I had trouble staying awake during manufacturing processes lectures ( didn't help they are on a Monday morning). The modules I did enjoy were the maths and the thermodynamics.

    Some of it is just me being lazy, but these constant doubts about my course are making it very hard for me to focus. I have done no revision over Christmas and now will have to cram as much as possible during revision week. Something I haven't really had to do before.

    Has anyone else felt similarly when they started? Did it get better for you?

    You don't really forget much (in terms of the basics) but i know what you mean and I agree. Most of it to be honest is just learning content to pass exams and then afterwards you forget most of it...so yes in some cases it seems rather pointless but the whole point of the degree is that it's teaching you to think like an engineer and to think for yourself.

    So if somebody came to you with a complex problem, you should be able to know how to go about solving it using some of the tools you've picked on your degree or have some idea of how you will approach it to come to a feasible solution. On placements you will see that real life engineering is probably doing some paperwork while sat at an office desk and on a computer using excel or some simulation software (CAD etc.) and maybe if your lucky the company might let you have some client interaction and possibly have you go to site visits (both local or internationally) every now and again just to supervise stuff.
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    (Original post by a10)
    You don't really forget much (in terms of the basics) but i know what you mean and I agree. Most of it to be honest is just learning content to pass exams and then afterwards you forget most of it...so yes in some cases it seems rather pointless but the whole point of the degree is that it's teaching you to think like an engineer and to think for yourself.

    So if somebody came to you with a complex problem, you should be able to know how to go about solving it using some of the tools you've picked on your degree or have some idea of how you will approach it to come to a feasible solution. On placements you will see that real life engineering is probably doing some paperwork while sat at an office desk and on a computer using excel or some simulation software (CAD etc.) and maybe if your lucky the company might let you have some client interaction and possibly have you go to site visits (both local or internationally) every now and again just to supervise stuff.

    That is a nice answer, thank you. The course does involve teaching you a lot of principles you will need as an engineer like you said even if the content itself is not totally relevant. I'm just scared that If I find too many things both hard and boring, I won't be able to complete my course. The change of setting and the more responsibilities you have also take time to adjust to. Hopefully I'll get my work rhythm back and just get on with it.
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    (Original post by kake55)
    That is a nice answer, thank you. The course does involve teaching you a lot of principles you will need as an engineer like you said even if the content itself is not totally relevant. I'm just scared that If I find too many things both hard and boring, I won't be able to complete my course. The change of setting and the more responsibilities you have also take time to adjust to. Hopefully I'll get my work rhythm back and just get on with it.
    It's perfectly normal to find some things quite hard and boring...it's just a matter of sticking through it really. You can't like everything on the course or at least I don't know anyone that does haha!
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    (Original post by a10)
    You don't really forget much (in terms of the basics) but i know what you mean and I agree. Most of it to be honest is just learning content to pass exams and then afterwards you forget most of it...so yes in some cases it seems rather pointless but the whole point of the degree is that it's teaching you to think like an engineer and to think for yourself.

    So if somebody came to you with a complex problem, you should be able to know how to go about solving it using some of the tools you've picked on your degree or have some idea of how you will approach it to come to a feasible solution. On placements you will see that real life engineering is probably doing some paperwork while sat at an office desk and on a computer using excel or some simulation software (CAD etc.) and maybe if your lucky the company might let you have some client interaction and possibly have you go to site visits (both local or internationally) every now and again just to supervise stuff.
    Post of the century.

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    (Original post by addylad)
    Post of the century.

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    Haha

    How's your course treating you?
 
 
 
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