Edexcel Part A History Coursework help please Watch

Hollyalock
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Hi there.
I am really struggling with my part a coursework so much so I have changed my question so many times! I need 5 sources from around the time in the question and if I don't nothing I do counts!

Was thinking of doing something like,
"How significant was Lenin in the Bolshevik rise to power between 1917-1924?"
if anyone could help me with a plan and structure and maybe even with contemporary sources I would be so grateful thank you!
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Naveen1412
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I have 2 sources I dunno if they are helpful:

Source 1: From the 'Memoirs of Lenin' written by N. Krupskaya (Lenin's wife) published in 1970. Here she is describing Lenin's arrival at the Finland Station

The Petrograd masses, workers, soldiers and sailors came to meet their leader...There was a sea of people all around. Red banners, a guard of honour of sailors, searchlights from the fortress of Peter and Paul decorated the road...armoured cars, a chain of working men and women guarded the road.

Source 2: From a speech by Kornilov in August 1917

It is time to hang the German supporters and spied, with Lenin at their head, and to disperse the Soviet of Workers' and Soldiers' Deputies far and wide. I have no personal ambition, I only wish to save Russia, and will gladly submit to a strong Provisional Government purified of all undesirable elements.


Its a freaky coincidence because I was just making notes on Lenin's return and the Bolshevik takeover for Unit 2. Once i've finished I could probably help in terms of the content
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Hollyalock
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(Original post by Naveen1412)
I have 2 sources I dunno if they are helpful:

Source 1: From the 'Memoirs of Lenin' written by N. Krupskaya (Lenin's wife) published in 1970. Here she is describing Lenin's arrival at the Finland Station

The Petrograd masses, workers, soldiers and sailors came to meet their leader...There was a sea of people all around. Red banners, a guard of honour of sailors, searchlights from the fortress of Peter and Paul decorated the road...armoured cars, a chain of working men and women guarded the road.

Source 2: From a speech by Kornilov in August 1917

It is time to hang the German supporters and spied, with Lenin at their head, and to disperse the Soviet of Workers' and Soldiers' Deputies far and wide. I have no personal ambition, I only wish to save Russia, and will gladly submit to a strong Provisional Government purified of all undesirable elements.


Its a freaky coincidence because I was just making notes on Lenin's return and the Bolshevik takeover for Unit 2. Once i've finished I could probably help in terms of the content

That's great! Thank you so much, really appreciate it and that would be brilliant if you could help in terms of content

Holly
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Naveen1412
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(Original post by Hollyalock)
That's great! Thank you so much, really appreciate it and that would be brilliant if you could help in terms of content

Holly
Well when I was doing Part A were told to do an Intro, 3 paragraphs and conclusion and to put our paragraphs in chronological order with good links between them to get an A*

To get a level 4 the mark scheme basically says

-have ur answer directed explicitly and consistently at the explanation focus which means uses terms like 'very significant', 'significant to a large extent'

-the material is well selected and deployed effectively to support analysis so basically just use evidence and use PEEL structure, particularly statistics for evidence

- and generally just good use of historical terms and good structure with almost perfect SPAG

For the first paragraph I would prob do it about the April Theses and the July Days because these were heavily influenced by Lenin's return to Russia, which was funded by the Germans. Lenin had really extremist views which were the reason for his exile in the first place.

Useful stats to include as evidence:
By June 1917 there were more than 40 newspapers spreading Lenin's views and ideas across Russia
The Red Guard were 10,000 strong by July 1917
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Naveen1412
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Lenin also promised things that he knew would drum up support for himself and the Bolsheviks by using slogans like 'Peace, Bread and Land' to appeal to the masses of hungry industrial workers and peasants who were starving due to food shortages and inflation, wanted peace because the heavy defeats in WW1 and did not have productive agrilcultural methods because of the horses being taken for use in the cavalry in the army and old fashioned strip/subsistence farming
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Hollyalock
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(Original post by Naveen1412)
Lenin also promised things that he knew would drum up support for himself and the Bolsheviks by using slogans like 'Peace, Bread and Land' to appeal to the masses of hungry industrial workers and peasants who were starving due to food shortages and inflation, wanted peace because the heavy defeats in WW1 and did not have productive agrilcultural methods because of the horses being taken for use in the cavalry in the army and old fashioned strip/subsistence farming
I was debating whether to change it to something about the first world war and how it impacted on the tsarist regime, do you think that would be a better question to gain contemporary sources or should I stick to Lenin?
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Naveen1412
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Yh I think that question would be better because you could easily organise it into:
-Military impact - low morale and desertions, Tannenberg/Masurian lakes, lack of equipment
-Economic impact - Inflation
-Social impact - Famine, food shortages
-Political impact - Hatred towards the tsar for leaving Alexandra in charge, Rasputin's deathby angry nobles

I have 6 sources about the Russian defeats but they are all from around 1916, You could find a documentary of these events on youtube and quote historians from them? or do they have to be written sources?
Btw im doing GCSE history not A level, how many words it is meant to be and what are the constraints of it like is it a question of impact, significance, how many marks is it
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Naveen1412
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this thread is also useful:
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...Phrases_to_Use
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Hollyalock
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(Original post by Naveen1412)
this thread is also useful:
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...Phrases_to_Use
Thanks for all this help, it's great! Yeah I think I'm going to go for that question regarding WW1's impact on the tsarist regime. The sources can be written or images but they have to be from around the time too, I need 5, any ideas?

I'm starting my plan but it's getting to the point where I'm talking more towards when the tsar abdicated than the actual was impating on anything :/
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Naveen1412
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(Original post by Hollyalock)
Thanks for all this help, it's great! Yeah I think I'm going to go for that question regarding WW1's impact on the tsarist regime. The sources can be written or images but they have to be from around the time too, I need 5, any ideas?

I'm starting my plan but it's getting to the point where I'm talking more towards when the tsar abdicated than the actual was impating on anything :/
Sources if you need:

The German general, von Moltke, describes the slaughter at Tannenberg
The sight of thousands of Russians driven into huge lakes and swamps was ghastly. The shrieks and cries of the dying men I will never forget. So fearful was the sight of these thousands of men with their guns, horses and ammunition, struggling in the water that, to shorten their agony, they turned the machine-guns on them. But even in spite of that, there was movement seen among them for a week after.

From a letter written by the tsar to his wife in July 1916
Without metal the mills cannot supply a sufficient number of bullets and bombs. The same is true as regards the railways. The minister of Transportation assures me that the railways are working better this year than last, but nevertheless everyone complains that they are not doing as well as they might

Written by Belaiev, A Russian general In recent battles, a third of the men had no rifles. The poor devils had to wait patiently until their comrades fell before their eyes and they could pick up weapons. The army is drowning in its own blood.

A police report on army morale, October 1916
The behaviour of the soldiers, especially in the units in the rear, is most provocative. They accuse the military authorities of corruption, cowardice and drunkenness, and even treason. Everywhere one meets thousands of deserters, carrying out crimes and offering violence to the civilian population.

From a report by the Chairman of the Military Commission of the duma
As early as the beginning of the second year of the war, desertions of soldiers at the front and on their way to the front became commonplace, and the average number of deserters reacher 25 per cent. I happen to know of three cases when the train was stopped because there were no passengers on it; all, with the exception of the officer in command, had run away.

From a history of Russia published in 1996
There was a total lack of patriotic feeling amongst the majority of the working classes and an increasing number of strikes. This was due to the high cost of living and the increasing shortages of food, clothing and footwear. By the beginning of 1917 prices were five to ten times greater than in the year 1915

From a history of Russia published in 1996
As the news from the war got worse and the situation in the cities got more desperate, support for the Tsar and his wife began to decrease among the upper and middle classes of society and even among the aristocracy. They were appalled that a man like Rasputin should be allowed such influence and they had little respect for the Tsarina.

From a January 1917 Okhrana report
The industrial proletariat of the capital is on the verge of despair. The smallest outbreak will lead to uncontrollable riots. Even if we assume that wages have increased by 100 per cent, the cost of living has risen by 300 per cent. The impossibility of obtaining food, the time wasted in queues outside shops, the increasing death rate due to inadequate diet and the cold and dampness as a result of the lack of coal and firewood - all these conditions have created such a situation that the mass of industrial workers are quite ready to let themselves go to the wildest excesses of a hunger riot.


From a letter written by Grand Duke Michael to the tsar in January 1917. He was describing the problems facing Russia at the time
The unrest continues to grow. Those who defend the idea that Russia cannot exist without a tsar are losing the ground under their feet, since the facts of disorganisation and lawlessness are obvious. A situation like this cannot last long. It is impossible to rule the country without paying attention to the voice of the people and without meeting their needs.
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Hollyalock
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(Original post by Naveen1412)
Sources if you need:

The German general, von Moltke, describes the slaughter at Tannenberg
The sight of thousands of Russians driven into huge lakes and swamps was ghastly. The shrieks and cries of the dying men I will never forget. So fearful was the sight of these thousands of men with their guns, horses and ammunition, struggling in the water that, to shorten their agony, they turned the machine-guns on them. But even in spite of that, there was movement seen among them for a week after.

From a letter written by the tsar to his wife in July 1916
Without metal the mills cannot supply a sufficient number of bullets and bombs. The same is true as regards the railways. The minister of Transportation assures me that the railways are working better this year than last, but nevertheless everyone complains that they are not doing as well as they might

Written by Belaiev, A Russian general In recent battles, a third of the men had no rifles. The poor devils had to wait patiently until their comrades fell before their eyes and they could pick up weapons. The army is drowning in its own blood.

A police report on army morale, October 1916
The behaviour of the soldiers, especially in the units in the rear, is most provocative. They accuse the military authorities of corruption, cowardice and drunkenness, and even treason. Everywhere one meets thousands of deserters, carrying out crimes and offering violence to the civilian population.

From a report by the Chairman of the Military Commission of the duma
As early as the beginning of the second year of the war, desertions of soldiers at the front and on their way to the front became commonplace, and the average number of deserters reacher 25 per cent. I happen to know of three cases when the train was stopped because there were no passengers on it; all, with the exception of the officer in command, had run away.

From a history of Russia published in 1996
There was a total lack of patriotic feeling amongst the majority of the working classes and an increasing number of strikes. This was due to the high cost of living and the increasing shortages of food, clothing and footwear. By the beginning of 1917 prices were five to ten times greater than in the year 1915

From a history of Russia published in 1996
As the news from the war got worse and the situation in the cities got more desperate, support for the Tsar and his wife began to decrease among the upper and middle classes of society and even among the aristocracy. They were appalled that a man like Rasputin should be allowed such influence and they had little respect for the Tsarina.

From a January 1917 Okhrana report
The industrial proletariat of the capital is on the verge of despair. The smallest outbreak will lead to uncontrollable riots. Even if we assume that wages have increased by 100 per cent, the cost of living has risen by 300 per cent. The impossibility of obtaining food, the time wasted in queues outside shops, the increasing death rate due to inadequate diet and the cold and dampness as a result of the lack of coal and firewood - all these conditions have created such a situation that the mass of industrial workers are quite ready to let themselves go to the wildest excesses of a hunger riot.


From a letter written by Grand Duke Michael to the tsar in January 1917. He was describing the problems facing Russia at the time
The unrest continues to grow. Those who defend the idea that Russia cannot exist without a tsar are losing the ground under their feet, since the facts of disorganisation and lawlessness are obvious. A situation like this cannot last long. It is impossible to rule the country without paying attention to the voice of the people and without meeting their needs.
The sources are amazing thank you so much!
Do you have ideas for paragraphs? I was thinking one about soldiers discontent leading their mistrust of the tsar and the people back home but what else? :/
You have been an amazing help thank you so much!
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Hollyalock
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(Original post by Hollyalock)
The sources are amazing thank you so much!
Do you have ideas for paragraphs? I was thinking one about soldiers discontent leading their mistrust of the tsar and the people back home but what else? :/
You have been an amazing help thank you so much!
The final question is "How significant was the impact of the First World War in the collapse of the Tsarist regime?"

Any handy thoughts on Structure?
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Naveen1412
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Probably the soldier's discontent first and about how it led to them mutinying on February 26th and 27th making it very significant

The president of the duma told the tsar in a telegram that 'The troops of the garrison cannot be relied upon'

Then maybe link that to the problems in the towns and cities (social and economic effects) by talking about how the constant devastating news led to low morale and that there were food shortages and inflations, made worse by the brutally cold winter in Petrograd, with temperature falling below -30 degrees.

This in turn influenced the tsar to be blamed because he left Alexandra in charge who only listened to the corrupt Rasputin.
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Naveen1412
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here are my notes on the topic if u need:


The impact of the First World War
Military defeats, Tannenberg, Masurian Lakes, appointment of Tsar as commander in chief
-28 June 1914-Heir to Austrian throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated in Serbia-Austria and Germany declare war on Serbia
-Russia joins the war in August 1914 as the protector of Serbia and as a member of the Triple Entente (=Russia, France and Britain)

Early August 1914-Russian advances
-A Russian army advanced 160km into Austria. Two Russian armies advanced in the German province of East Prussia
26-29 August 1914-Battle of Tannenberg
-A German army surrounded one of the Russian armies in a swampland at Tannenberg
-70,000 soldiers killed and wounded, 50,000 taken prisoner
-Russian commander, General Samsonov, ashamed, commits suicide
5-9 September 1914-Battle of Masurian Lakes
-German army advanced northwards by rail and defeated second Russian army at the Battle of Masurian Lakes. 100,000 Russians killed or wounded,
May 1915-Austro-German offensive
-A joint Austro-German offensive forced the Russians to retreat over 480km from Germany back to Russia. Only the extreme Russian winter prevented further Austro German advances and saved Russia from defeat
August 1915
-Nicholas takes personal command of the Russian armies, leaving himself open to blame for the millions of deaths and disastrous war effort
-He had no military experience and was not capable, making no difference to the war effort
June 1916-Brusilov offensive
-Russian counter-attack led by General Brusilov drove deep into Austrian territory, regaining much of the land lost in 1915. However, the arrival of German reinforcements saved Austria and stopped the Russian advances and forced them to retreat into Russia again
-One million Russian deaths, by winter all gains from Brusilov offensive lost


Reasons for the Russian defeats
-Poor communication-outdated telegraph system, military commands got lost and were intercepted by the Germans, giving away their positions
-Lack of infrastructure-not enough steelworks, explosive factories or shipyards
-Supplies and equipment-Many soldiers died without weapons or ammunition, many did not have boots or winter coats to war in the bitterly cold weather, lack of medical supplies
-Lazy, incompetent generals who did not work as a team-In 1914, they moved their armies too quickly into East Prussia, confident of victory and were too far ahead of their support and supplies
-Many desertions took place due to low morale caused by casualties, frequent deaths and poor equipment

Food shortages
-Less food was produced because of the shortage of labour and horses. As more peasants were called up to the armed forces, there were fewer men left to work on the land.
-14 million men were called up to serve in the army between 1914 and 1917
-The demand for horses at the front also made it harder for peasants to cultivate their land, encouraging higher food prices
-These problems were worsened by Petrograd’s severe winter

Inflation
-Consumer goods, such as boots and cloth became scarce and expensive
-Because of the shortages, prices were rising continually
-There were seven price rises between 1913 and 1917, prices quadrupled

Transport problems
-Russia’s transport system could not cope with the increased demands of war, as well as providing industry with the necessary raw materials
-Even when fuel and food were available, supplies frequently failed to reach people in the towns and cities due to Russia’s inadequate transport system
-Trains were being used for the war effort, not supplying the army or the people.
-The railway system fell into chaos and trainloads of food were left rotting

Political upheaval
-The Tsar’s decision to take command of the war and move to the front was a serious political mistake because it left Alexandra, the tsarina, with the role of running the country
-Alexandra was German and it was rumoured she was a German spy trying to sabotage the Russian war effort
-She refused to take from middle-class members of the duma and instead listened to the corrupt Rasputin, who seemed to be in charge of the government
-The constant changing of ministers meant nobody was organising food, fuel and other supplies to the city properly
-With nothing but bad news from the war and cities full of starving people, support for the tsar drastically decreased, they blamed him for leaving a German woman influenced by a mad monk in control of the country
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Naveen1412
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Nicholas' decision to take personal command of the army meant he could be blamed for the defeats despite a number of other contributing factors
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Hollyalock
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(Original post by Naveen1412)
Nicholas' decision to take personal command of the army meant he could be blamed for the defeats despite a number of other contributing factors
The sources you gave me were brilliant however a couple of the extracts I cannot find online from which book they came from, when I do my bibliography I need the author and where the contemporary source was published.
Thank you, yet again, great help, I am very glad you have been able to help me!
Holly
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Naveen1412
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they were all from this textbook:

http://books.google.co.uk/books/abou...d=1zkfAQAAMAAJ
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Hollyalock
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Thank you, that's great, it's all coming together now!
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Hollyalock
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(Original post by Naveen1412)
they were all from this textbook:

http://books.google.co.uk/books/abou...d=1zkfAQAAMAAJ
Hi anychance you can read this paragraph please and give me any tips or help on the next which is about the war creating the problem of distrust of the tsar?

The soldiers’ discontent during the First World War had a massive impact on the Tsarist Regime. Up until the First World War the military was always one of the Tsars largest pillars of support, without this he was without his power and essentially control. Tsar Nicholas II used his military as a means of stopping any resistance from the common people, evident by their allegiance during Bloody Sunday in 1905, but the war changed this. The war killed over… Russian soldiers and with so many men killed for what felt like so little gain it was no surprise that the morale of the soldiers was low. The German General, Von Moltke described what he saw of the Russian army: “The shrieks and cries of the dying men I will never forget […] [to] shorten their agony, they turned the machine guns on them [selves ].” This is evidence that the soldiers had such little faith in themselves and their leader that they were willing to kill themselves in order to escape. Other soldiers’ discontent drove them to be involved in a mass mutiny on February 26TH where troops fired on demonstrating crowds in the local army regiments. It was said that the troops of the garrison could not be relied upon after this incident.
The soldiers were also extremely ill equipped making it harder for them to defend themselves against the enemy, in the worst case scenarios Belaiev, a Russian General stated that “The poor devils had to wait patiently until their comrades fell before their eyes and they could pick up the weapons”.
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Naveen1412
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I cant really help you with that point other than him becoming commander-in-chef in august 1915

however for another point this source might be helpful

I dont know whether i send it already but there was a source which was a letter from Rodzianko to the tsar about what was going on in petrograd

“That fat Rodzianko has again sent me some nonsense to which I will not even reply.” Nicholas II, responding to Rodzianko in February 1917

i thought this showed the tsar's ignorance to the problem at hand and how he was incapable of being leader/refusing to take advice from the president of the duma, the tsar was not present in petrograd in feb 1917 so it shows how foolish he was to ignore this
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