Turn on thread page Beta

Would you send your children to a private school? watch

Announcements
  • View Poll Results: Would you send your children to a private school?
    Yes
    101
    67.79%
    No
    33
    22.15%
    Don't know yet
    15
    10.07%

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by City bound)
    It makes enough of a difference for unis to expect more and higher qualifications from privatly educated pupils.
    i suppose so!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Yes. If I could afford it.

    I'd rather they grow up among the snobbish and stuck-up (I know I'm stereotyping a bit, but I'm just using it as an example) than take the risk that they would get involved with the druggies and low-lifes that you will undoubtedly find in almost every state school.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Saskia-)
    What you say is a good point, as I said earlier the private school I go to is non-selective so not everyone is pushed to get AAA but to reach the upper limits and the best they are capable of.

    Although I have to say there are more people who get worse grades in a state school than a private it school, in my experience of attending both a state school and a private school. However that may not be the case around the country and is only an example of a closed scenario.
    (However, there are obviously some students at state school who acheive equal if not higher results, and for those people I have great respect)


    This is primarily because there are less distractions, i.e at the state school a lot of students messed around rather than work.
    Which is a shame because there is potential in everyone.

    I would say self-motivation is the primary key to success and I 100% agree with you there, but if you're not being taught the syllabus properly by your teachers how can you acheive your true potential? If the classes are so full that the teachers do not have the time to explain and teach you how can you fully understand the subject?

    Unlike GCSE you cannot remember things and regurgitate them in an exam true understanding is required...if this is not taught correctly then failure is more likely than success.

    But having said that, hard work is essential no-matter what school you go to. And i fully appreciate your viewpoint,
    also I hope you don't think im a snob by going to private school!!!
    But, you do not need to be thought the syllabus. You can do it yourself from the books at home? People from private schools get thought the syllabus but end up with **** grades? (not all obviously) compared to state? At the end of the day it just depends how much effort you put in. Private schools cant force you to go home and study. They can teach you but you may be sleeping in all the lessons. So, its up to the individual. But, yeah i totally agree with your other views.

    and oh...i dont think ur a snob!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Not attend private school daily, but if they wanted to board then I'd let them. I always wanted to go to a boarding school when I was little and wish I'd had the option to.
    Not because I hated my family! I used to read Enid Blyton's books about it and just wanted to go!

    Though I do believe that rich people shouldn't have better oppourtunities for education (as I do with health care too) than poor people. It's not a childs fault what familiy it's born into.

    I'm lucky though... my parent's moved house so I could be in the catchment for one of the best state schools in our area. I'm glad they did, for I think I'd have become a totally different person (academically) if I didn't attend the school and sixth form that I do.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    The network a good private school usually gives you is also a big advantage. A bit like an alumi network of a university.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Ooh... and members of my family go to private schools, and their parents say they only sit with them and read because they want to set a good example for the teachers... they're paying for education, therefore they'll do the work with their children at home.

    This is only one view of parents, but I think it's quite shallow that some people only sit with their children and take a more active interest in their education just because they're paying for it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shewantstobeme)
    Not attend private school daily, but if they wanted to board then I'd let them. I always wanted to go to a boarding school when I was little and wish I'd had the option to.
    Not because I hated my family! I used to read Enid Blyton's books about it and just wanted to go!

    Though I do believe that rich people shouldn't have better oppourtunities for education (as I do with health care too) than poor people. It's not a childs fault what familiy it's born into.

    I'm lucky though... my parent's moved house so I could be in the catchment for one of the best state schools in our area. I'm glad they did, for I think I'd have become a totally different person (academically) if I didn't attend the school and sixth form that I do.
    Where's the difference between buying your way into a catchment area and paying directly for schooling? At the end of the day education is just another product. I don't see how people can object to someone's right to buy more or less of something.

    Look at it another way, from a macro view, allowing people to invest further in education only serves to improve the nations stock of human capital. Thereby improving growth and national prosperity. Thus commences the economic advantages of growth and the ensuing positive spiral.

    (Original post by shewantstobeme)
    Ooh... and members of my family go to private schools, and their parents say they only sit with them and read because they want to set a good example for the teachers... they're paying for education, therefore they'll do the work with their children at home.

    This is only one view of parents, but I think it's quite shallow that some people only sit with their children and take a more active interest in their education just because they're paying for it.
    Shallow or not it's still a positive effect.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by City bound)
    Look at it another way, from a macro view, allowing people to invest further in education only serves to improve the nations stock of human capital. Thereby improving growth and national prosperity. Thus commences the economic advantages of growth and the ensuing positive spiral.
    Sensible, as always.

    To rep (When I can...)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shewantstobeme)
    I'm lucky though... my parent's moved house so I could be in the catchment for one of the best state schools in our area.
    For shame. You're simply taking the place of someone who can't afford a private school by spending a vast sum of money (which would enable you to go to a PS) to move to a better catchment area.


    (Original post by shewantstobeme)
    Though I do believe that rich people shouldn't have better oppourtunities for education (as I do with health care too) than poor people. It's not a childs fault what familiy it's born into.
    Why not? The parents earned their money (or inherited it from a relative who earned it), so why shouldn't they be able to buy a better education and start in life? Yes, education is a right, but it doesn't mean everyone has to be equal.

    In my opinion, privately educated people are more emplyable. People say that PS isn't about getting the right accent and mixing with the right people anymore, but it still is. Apart from receiving a better education, you get the kinder eye of privately educated employers, you get the 'old boy' network. You're getting a better chance than the guy next to you in life, basically.

    I spent 15 years in private education, and yes, I could probably be called a snob. But at least I fulfilled my potential, enjoyed my education and surroundings, and have a wide network of friends who will go on to hold powerful positions in later life.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Definitely Not.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I would definitley send my kids to private school. I think it gives kids an advantage in life, if that is unfair so be it. If I could not afford to send them to a private school all their lives I would send them for secondary school only. Similarly regardless of how much money I had I would insist on them going to a state sixth form which is what I have done because I think it would help to give them a sense of reality.

    I am a big supporter of grammar schools as well though
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SavvySaviour)
    I'd rather they grow up among the snobbish and stuck-up (I know I'm stereotyping a bit, but I'm just using it as an example) than take the risk that they would get involved with the druggies and low-lifes that you will undoubtedly find in almost every state school.
    I appreciate that you're stereotyping to a degree for the sake of your point, but I really don't know why private schools are still assumed to be 'snobbish' - at least any more than state schools are. Of course, there are still going to be some of your stereotypically posh public school students, especially at the most prestigious institutions, but I think the mildly negative view held by state school pupils of private school pupils is probably comparable to any negative view held by private school pupils of state schools pupils. I don't think any snobbery is exclusive to private schools, it's just a general product of a perceived class difference and it works both ways.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    some people seem to have basic flaws in their perception of education. you say that people at private schools are more likely to florish - to an extent that is true. BUT Success is like a gastank - everyone fills up, depending on how much potential you have you can fill up more then the next guy. Success isnt about money, its about filling your potential to the max - whereever your potential lies - as long as you fulfill it you have succeed - because you will had led your life the way you want.

    Having experienced both private and state education I would say that it depends far more ont the person. I've know people at inner city comps - arguably some of the worst education in the country - go on and get 1sts at Oxbridge, and be wonderful sociable people.

    On the flip side:

    Ive known people at a very very good private school compleatly fail A levels - and crash out - why - because he diddnt work he diddnt do anything basiclly. Its sad because he was a great guy and should have done a lot more for himself - clearly the teaching regardless of how good it is dosnt help at all - if you dont want to learn.

    Where does this lead us? well everyone has talent, your arguments based on success have mainly centered around acedemia, it is important to keep in mind that acedemia does not constitute everything - there are plently of other ways you can succeed - some are not measureable - can you really measure how much a person grows? how their experiences shape them and how they contribute in non economic ways? Having money, whilst definatly a advantage is not the whole aim of life. Yes we may not be able to do great national things - but throughout life we can all do out bit - can you say that altruistic acts of love are not a contribution to sociaty? we can all do little things that are great.

    I know a guy thats a genius at maths, he slept through 3/4 of all the maths lessons and cruised the double maths course. the maths HoD pushed him to do maths at Cambridge - he refused. why? because he wanted to do computer science instead - he followed his dreams he is now happily at Leeds probably getting pissed. He told me its the best decision he ever made - because to him, and in a way to me hes fulfilling his potential , he is so far, a success.

    Wangers
    Offline

    12
    Wangers stop putting your name at the end of everything you write. We know it is you who is posting it, there is no need to sign off.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wangers)
    I've know people at inner city comps - arguably some of the worst education in the country - go on and get 1sts at Oxbridge, and be wonderful sociable people.
    That very well may be, but the one or two who do this do not represent the whole. Consistency is a key word in this debate. Private schools consistently churn out the better educated, compared to the 'inner city comps,' who really don't.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I wouldn't send my kids to a private school, no.
    Would cost heaps of money and they'd probably come out with an overbearing attitude, haha.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Becasuse there is a better working enviroment - that I happily concede.
    My point that it is down to the individuals ability and determination still stands, otherwise there would be no inner city comprehensive alumini acheiving anything.

    Yes private schools do have a better teaching support network, however the work still has to be done by the student, the exams still have to be sat by the student. It is therefore a assessment of how well they have learnt, not how well they were taught. This is simply validated by the fact that people in conprehensives who self teach still get good grades, and their education is argueably sh*t.

    Wangers
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    If private schools didn't offer a better education and enhance the chances of kids getting good grades, parents wouldn't pay tens of thousands of pounds to send kids there.

    Going to a private school, on average, boosts children's grades. It makes it easier to get good grades.

    Yes the child still has to do the groundwork, but private schools have better resources, smaller classes and provide a better environment for learning, on average, than state schools. Many also have entrance examinations and give out bursaries to certain pupils, creating an even better working environment. That's why parents are willing to pay so much to send their children there.

    (And for reference I don't go to a private school)
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    no.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Thud)
    no.
    Lol... you DONT SAY Thud!
 
 
 
Poll
Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.