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Would you send your children to a private school? watch

  • View Poll Results: Would you send your children to a private school?
    Yes
    101
    67.79%
    No
    33
    22.15%
    Don't know yet
    15
    10.07%

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    Yes. And if I had to I'd drive over some poor kids in my Range Rover so my little ones could get to school in time for morning assembly.
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    (Original post by Lawz-)
    Lol... you DONT SAY Thud!
    Wonders never cease.
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    (Original post by Saskia-)
    p.s someone earlier said that Private schools are "by definition selective", obviously I cannot speak for every singLe private school in the UK, But the one I go to is 100% non-selective. And the results gained at A Level and GCSE are some of the top in the country. The school also offers lots and lots of scholarships from music, sport, dance, academic and even 6th form scholarships.
    Is it needs-blind in its admissions? As in, does it admit people who need the places first, and worry about if they can pay the fees later? If not, its selective, in that it selects rich people over poor people. That was the distinction i was making (although i regret phrasing it in terms likley to confuse with grammers, etc)
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    (Original post by milio)
    Less racism.
    Please can you provide some substantial evidence for your outlandish claim?

    (Original post by milio)
    All the teachers that used to teach at state schools said that the pupils were so disruptive, and there wasnt any chance for the pupils who wanted to learn to concentrate. Also the pupils that joined from state school say that their previous schools were really bad.
    This is a hasty generalization based on a biased sample. It is reasonable to suggest that teachers who are teaching in the private sector having left the state sector are more likely to have had negative experiences in the state sector, hence their willingness to leave it, and this will be reflected in their comments about it. Secondly, in order to feel accepted by their new school community, the students may regard their old experiences as bad and their new situation as good; they are positively reinforcing themselves, so to speak. Furthermore, again, the students may have had negative experiences in the state sector and therefore their parents have placed them in independent schools. Impromptu comments made by staff and pupils in the setting that you have provided is not an adequate means of judging the state sector as a whole.
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    (Original post by Crazy Mongoose)
    Is it needs-blind in its admissions?
    Hi
    In response, no the admissions are not blind, they are interviewed, to ensure that the school is right for you and that you can provide something back to the school, not based on parental income!!!
    As the school is so diverse (i.e its a ballet school also/an equestrian centre ...what have you) people can be admitted on scholarships for those individual things, not just academic excellence.
    i.e I got a dance scholarship so I'm obliged to attend all dance lessons, but it means (in comparison with my old school) I benefit from the academic side too (smaller classes, teachers who actually attend the lessons!lol )


    (Original post by Crazy Mongoose)
    As in, does it admit people who need the places first, and worry about if they can pay the fees later? If not, its selective, in that it selects rich people over poor people. That was the distinction i was making (although i regret phrasing it in terms likley to confuse with grammers, etc)
    Yes, it admits places first then sorts out financial arrangements after that. Whether that be a scholarship or otherwise. As I say its 100% non selective.
    IMO that's the only way to do it, chosing one child over another because of background is unfair, in most circumstances.
    However I suspect that not all private schools are non-selective...although don't quote me on that one!

    Hope that this is a reasonable response
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    yes - if they couldnt get into a grammar school
    meritocracy ftw
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    I appreciate that you're stereotyping to a degree for the sake of your point, but I really don't know why private schools are still assumed to be 'snobbish' - at least any more than state schools are. Of course, there are still going to be some of your stereotypically posh public school students, especially at the most prestigious institutions, but I think the mildly negative view held by state school pupils of private school pupils is probably comparable to any negative view held by private school pupils of state schools pupils. I don't think any snobbery is exclusive to private schools, it's just a general product of a perceived class difference and it works both ways.
    Having never been (properly) to a private school I can't know for sure but people who can afford to pay thousands of pounds a year to send their children there are surely going to be more.. conservative in their attitudes towards life and others than the students (and parents of students) who attend state schools? Wouldn't this attitude also be held by their children in the majority of cases - I mean, I suppose a lot of them can't be classed as snobbish when you get to know them but they're still more traditional and some of them are still likely to have a higher opinion of themselves (or their families) than your average state school pupil. Isn't it far more likely that you will find your more coservative and - in a sense - "stuck-up" people at a private school than at a public one (though still only a minority). There are quite a few middle class and wealthier people who attend my state school but the vast majority are from very poor working class families.
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    (Original post by SavvySaviour)
    Having never been (properly) to a private school I can't know for sure but people who can afford to pay thousands of pounds a year to send their children there are surely going to be more.. conservative in their attitudes towards life and others than the students (and parents of students) who attend state schools? Wouldn't this attitude also be held by their children in the majority of cases - I mean, I suppose a lot of them can't be classed as snobbish when you get to know them but they're still more traditional and some of them are still likely to have a higher opinion of themselves (or their families) than your average state school pupil. Isn't it far more likely that you will find your more coservative and - in a sense - "stuck-up" people at a private school than at a public one (though still only a minority). There are quite a few middle class and wealthier people who attend my state school but the vast majority are from very poor working class families.
    From my experience (and unhelpfully anecdotal evidence) I think there are more "stuck-down" people with a chip on their shoulder and victim mentality at state schools than there are "stuck-up" people at private school. My stereotype (grammar school educated) is hated by both of them, so I feel unbiased!

    There is no good (and rational) reason to oppose private education as I see it.
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    Yes I would - maybe 5 years ago I would have said no - I would prefer a state school but most of them around here are utter crap.

    The private school around here is miles better than any of the state ones - however it is so expensive that I would probably never be able to afford to send my children there anyway.
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    (Original post by blackswan)
    I let them decide
    When they are 11? Is that really the best idea?
    They will have all sorts of things influencing them

    I went to a state school and probably would have chosen it if I had the choice - but I am almost 100% sure I would have gotten better grades had I went to a better school

    (usual story - disruptive classes etc)
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    (Original post by SavvySaviour)
    ... they're still more traditional and some of them are still likely to have a higher opinion of themselves (or their families)...
    You say this as if it's a bad thing. Having a high opinion of yourself makes you more confident, giving you a higher chance of success in your academic efforts as well as in later life.
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    What exactly is "a high opinion"?

    You can be confident, without being arrogant.

    wangers
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    You say this as if it's a bad thing. Having a high opinion of yourself makes you more confident, giving you a higher chance of success in your academic efforts as well as in later life.
    It's good to an extent but if you think that you're better than other people simply because you have more money/you go to a beter school etc etc it isn't exactly a great opinion to have is it?

    I'd still rather send my children (if I ever decide to have any :rolleyes:) to a private than a state school though!
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    I've always been at a private school, and I believe if I had the money that I'd send my children also.
    I don't come from a very wealthy family... my parents each have one A level at grade D, and few GCSEs, and neither went to university. They have been able to afford to send me to private school due to my Dad setting up a small retail business.

    Saying that, I think it would depend on the child.
    I think that if I had not been at a private school I would not have the results which I do.
    I am not an particularly enthusiastic or organised student, and I tend to do minimum necessary and find it hard to motivate myself. I only get most work in because I fear the teachers! My boyfriend goes to a county state school and finds particularly at 6th form that no one is really there checking you are doing the work etc, whereas in my small classes of around 6 people I have to work to keep up.
    I also think that at my school (though I can't speak for any others), that there are no 'bad crowds'. There isn't really the danger of me befriending or becoming part of a group of people who were likely to drop out at 16, or who skive off school (which if I'm honest I would possibly occasionally do if my school weren't so tight on knowing where everyone was).. and I know my state school friends know these kinds of people.
    I think that it may be... easier (?) to stay on track in a private school, as I do not know how I'd be now if I had been friends with people who weren't as focused on work as people at my school are, seeing as I'm the sort of person who will do quite a lot to avoid too much hard work.

    Ok, this doesn't make me sound at all good!
    That's just my opinion though. For me, private school was without any doubt the best place. Though I think it's a disadvantage when it comes to applying to unis, and also some people who have never been to a state school seem quite prejudice and have preconvieced ideas about how we all are, which I'm pretty sure aren't all true. You can get hassle from people not at private school, and that really isn't all that pleasant.
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    The problem with this debate is that everyone is generalising (myself included.)

    Ultimately there are gonna be success stories from both the private and state sector of education.

    For example, the local private school is shoddy in comparison with many other schools: they only allow a student to take a Maximum of 9 gcses, and yet they still get worse results than many of the state schools in my town. I also know people from that school who are incredibly stuck up and look down on 'state school children'. Covnersely, I went to a state school that does worse than the national average. However, I still managed to come out with A*s, because I chose to work. I also was allowed to take 11 GCSES.

    However, I can also apreciate that in many places, people have had opposite experiences, which would shape their opinion. There is no clear cut answer as to which is better, a state school or a private school, each school differs and every student's experience differs.
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    (Original post by mousy)
    The problem with this debate is that everyone is generalising (myself included.)

    Ultimately there are gonna be success stories from both the private and state sector of education.
    I also know people from that school who are incredibly stuck up and look down on 'state school children'. Covnersely, I went to a state school that does worse than the national average. However, I still managed to come out with A*s, because I chose to work. I also was allowed to take 11 GCSES..
    Firstly your hard work is to be commended, well done
    This as the same for me also, I go to 6th form at a private school now, but was at a state school for the entirety of high school (yrs-7-11).
    And managed to get the grades required, due to hard work ( I had a yr and a 1/2 off during GCSE as I was ill)

    So I think it is certainly the case that hard work makes up for a lot.
    But ive found that A-levels are a different story, and you need real understanding only gained by correct tutoring (this is my personal learning style, Im sure many of you will disagree with me.) This was not possible at my old state school due to shortage of time, teachers and money as I have already said.

    So i think that the quality of a school depends on level of study also...


    (Original post by mousy)
    However, I can also apreciate that in many places, people have had opposite experiences, which would shape their opinion. There is no clear cut answer as to which is better, a state school or a private school, each school differs and every student's experience differs.

    ...this is very true, and It's great you've picked up on it. There is a variation on quality of private schools as well, this is true for the area I live in also.

    regards.
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    (Original post by Saskia-)
    Firstly your hard work is to be commended, well done
    This as the same for me also, I go to 6th form at a private school now, but was at a state school for the entirety of high school (yrs-7-11).
    And managed to get the grades required, due to hard work ( I had a yr and a 1/2 off during GCSE as I was ill)

    So I think it is certainly the case that hard work makes up for a lot.
    But ive found that A-levels are a different story, and you need real understanding only gained by correct tutoring (this is my personal learning style, Im sure many of you will disagree with me.) This was not possible at my old state school due to shortage of time, teachers and money as I have already said.

    So i think that the quality of a school depends on level of study also...
    Yep, I also moved away from my high school despite getting good grades their, and I am now at what is considered one of the best schools in suffolk. Its a state school but better than some private schools in the area. Surely Im therefore similar to those who send their kids to a private school to get the better education (albeit without the huge bills!) So i guess it really does depend.
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    Grammar schools are a pretty good idea. There's nothing wrong with selective education, in fact a lot of kids would benefit from it, just so long as there are alternatives available in the area.

    It's a bit hard NOT to generalise in a discussion like this because we're talking about private education vs state education, not specific insitutions. But qualifying every statement ('in general, private schools are...') gets a bit repetitive. Every school is going to be different. There's a private school in my area that's known not for its academic results but for its drug dealers...
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    (Original post by salgueira)
    Grammar schools are a pretty good idea. There's nothing wrong with selective education, in fact a lot of kids would benefit from it, just so long as there are alternatives available in the area.

    It's a bit hard NOT to generalise in a discussion like this because we're talking about private education vs state education, not specific insitutions. But qualifying every statement ('in general, private schools are...') gets a bit repetitive. Every school is going to be different. There's a private school in my area that's known not for its academic results but for its drug dealers...
    hehe
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    (Original post by mousy)
    The problem with this debate is that everyone is generalising (myself included.)

    Ultimately there are gonna be success stories from both the private and state sector of education.

    For example, the local private school is shoddy in comparison with many other schools: they only allow a student to take a Maximum of 9 gcses, and yet they still get worse results than many of the state schools in my town. I also know people from that school who are incredibly stuck up and look down on 'state school children'. Covnersely, I went to a state school that does worse than the national average. However, I still managed to come out with A*s, because I chose to work. I also was allowed to take 11 GCSES.

    However, I can also apreciate that in many places, people have had opposite experiences, which would shape their opinion. There is no clear cut answer as to which is better, a state school or a private school, each school differs and every student's experience differs.
    Let us place this argument firmly on fact. "Last year, 27.1% of pupils in independent schools gained three or more grade As at A-level, compared with 8% of pupils in all state schools." (BBC News)

    However, naturally, interpreting this statistic is fraught with danger.
 
 
 
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