XMaramena
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
I'm looking for some insight into CPU cores vs CPU speed vs CPU threads vs CPU caches. Now I am I right in thinking that the more CPU cores there, the more tasks it can process simultaneously, and the higher speed a CPU has, the faster it can process those tasks? And the cache being the size of the task it can process at once?

An example, I have the option of either:

Intel E5 12-core 24-thread 2.7GHz CPU w/30MB cache
Intel i7 6-core 12-thread 3.5GHz CPU w/15MB cache
0
reply
TheBBQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
You're in the right direction, cache is basically like on board ram, the cpu can access more data with more cache. (a heavily simplified version of what it actually is does)

http://searchstorage.techtarget.com/...n/cache-memory have a look here.

For the cores, you need specific instructions by whatever you are running to actually use the multiple cores. Basically if something is programmed to be run on only a single core, having more than one won't actually do much for it besides other tasks being offloaded to the other cores.


Architecture of the cpus also matters greatly which is why they just keep on getting faster and more efficient.

I will give better explanations tomorrow maybe
0
reply
Harjot
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by XMaramena)
I'm looking for some insight into CPU cores vs CPU speed vs CPU threads vs CPU caches. Now I am I right in thinking that the more CPU cores there, the more tasks it can process simultaneously, and the higher speed a CPU has, the faster it can process those tasks? And the cache being the size of the task it can process at once?

An example, I have the option of either:

Intel E5 12-core 24-thread 2.7GHz CPU w/30MB cache
Intel i7 6-core 12-thread 3.5GHz CPU w/15MB cache
Cache > Cores/Threads > Speed.

Speed is pretty much irrelevant nowadays being in the GHz range.
Cache is the most important factor here. Less time breaking stuff into smaller chunks for processing, more time doing useful stuff.
Cores/Threads are there because things are getting too small and CPU manufacturers want to have a bit of fun and companies need to sell something new to people.
0
reply
XMaramena
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by TheBBQ)
You're in the right direction, cache is basically like on board ram, the cpu can access more data with more cache. (a heavily simplified version of what it actually is does)

http://searchstorage.techtarget.com/...n/cache-memory have a look here.

For the cores, you need specific instructions by whatever you are running to actually use the multiple cores. Basically if something is programmed to be run on only a single core, having more than one won't actually do much for it besides other tasks being offloaded to the other cores.


Architecture of the cpus also matters greatly which is why they just keep on getting faster and more efficient.

I will give better explanations tomorrow maybe

(Original post by Harjot)
Cache > Cores/Threads > Speed.

Speed is pretty much irrelevant nowadays being in the GHz range.
Cache is the most important factor here. Less time breaking stuff into smaller chunks for processing, more time doing useful stuff.
Cores/Threads are there because things are getting too small and CPU manufacturers want to have a bit of fun and companies need to sell something new to people.
So what would you say would be best for a plugin program that processes multiple tasks at once? Processing files planted in 50GB RAM upwards and combining them for the end product?
0
reply
username1551801
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
What exactly are you trying to do?

Now I am I right in thinking that the more CPU cores there, the more tasks it can process simultaneously
Not necessarily, it depends on the program. Without going into details, the CPUs we use are concurrent, rather than parallel processing; meaning they don't actually execute simultaneously.

the higher speed a CPU has, the faster it can process those tasks?
Correct, in a sense. The quicker the clock cycles, the more ticks the CPU receives in a given time interval. So the quicker the ALU can calculate, the quicker the execution of threads.

And the cache being the size of the task it can process at once?
No, cache is used for temporary storage of data which is being accessed frequently.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you ever considered or are you currently considering an apprenticeship?

Yes, I am actively considering an apprenticeship (66)
12.24%
I am actively considering an alternative to uni that isn't an apprenticeship (9)
1.67%
I have considered an apprenticeship but it's not for me (141)
26.16%
I am considering a degree apprenticeship (44)
8.16%
I haven't considered an apprenticeship (261)
48.42%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (18)
3.34%

Watched Threads

View All