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    I'm on my gap year right now. I've applied for Occupation Therapy at the University of Liverpool and will be starting in Sept 2015. The thing is that I'm having second thoughts about whether I really want to study OT for the next 3 years. The pros are that I don't have to pay a fee as the NHS will cover that for me and by the end of my degree, employment rates are high for OTs as the NHS is trying to keep people out of hospitals so that's where we come in. So I'm very likely to find job after I come out of Uni.

    On the plus side, I won't be burdened by the thoughts of having to repay my debt. I've been accepted onto the course already so all I have to do is enrol. However, I've always had an interest in psychology as I find learning about human behaviour and the mind very intriguing. I believe that I would enjoy psychology a lot more than OT.

    What should my next step be?
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    Occupational therapy is kind of like a calling in my opinion, like nursing and midwifery. You must think back to why you wanted to apply to do OT in the first place. Was it because your head told you to do it for reasons as you said? Or is it because you really want to help people in the particular way OT allows you to do.

    I understand why you are interested in Psychology as its fascinating (I studied it at A-Level) although I have a friend that graduated and is struggling to find work in that area.

    But if Psychology is what you really want, go for it!! You will get where you want to be if you work hard. Don’t waste years in a job you don’t really want to do like a lot of people do. But I think your next step should be re-evaluating the next 3 years and think about what sort of job you want to end up doing.

    Sorry for rambling, but good luck J
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    (Original post by laurenforde)
    Occupational therapy is kind of like a calling in my opinion, like nursing and midwifery. You must think back to why you wanted to apply to do OT in the first place. Was it because your head told you to do it for reasons as you said? Or is it because you really want to help people in the particular way OT allows you to do.

    I understand why you are interested in Psychology as its fascinating (I studied it at A-Level) although I have a friend that graduated and is struggling to find work in that area.

    But if Psychology is what you really want, go for it!! You will get where you want to be if you work hard. Don’t waste years in a job you don’t really want to do like a lot of people do. But I think your next step should be re-evaluating the next 3 years and think about what sort of job you want to end up doing.

    Sorry for rambling, but good luck J
    I chose OT mainly for the reasons I've mentioned above. But there's also a reason why I didn't choose psychology in the first place because of the heavy workload during my a level years. I find it very fascinating but getting a job will be harder whereas OT has higher chances of employment.


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    Would you not consider mental health nursing? I only say as it gives you a chance to practice psychology and has employability similar to OT.
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    The main question is, do you actually enjoy OT? You would have had work experience. Going for it because it's NHS funded is completely the wrong thing to do (and I'm not sure if the employment opportunities are as fantastic as you suggest).

    Two friends that studied psychology at university are working as teaching assistants at primary schools, and we have someone at work who studied it, did very well, and works as an appointments clerk. Obviously not everyone ends up that way, but merely doing a psychology BSc will barely get you anywhere because so many others do the same thing. You would have to take into account the cost of doing the BSc and then further study/graduate roles/apprenticeships afterwards. If you have a clear path in your mind and consider it to be worth the effort, then great, but going in just because you find it interesting and not thinking beyond that is a very easy way of getting into £40k of debt for no reason.

    Going to university is an expensive way of studying something you're interested in. I know that sounds a bit ridiculous, but you can study something you like in your spare time. Anyone can pick up a textbook. The idea of going to university is to get that piece of paper that gets you onto the first rung of the career ladder.

    If you want my opinion (for what it's worth) if your heart isn't in OT, I wouldn't do that, but I also wouldn't do psychology either, unless you have a path in mind (and a backup in case it goes balls up). Take another year out if you have to, better to do that and use it to gain other experiences than to waste 3 years and risk a load of debt piling up in the background. University isn't compulsory by any means.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    The main question is, do you actually enjoy OT? You would have had work experience. Going for it because it's NHS funded is completely the wrong thing to do (and I'm not sure if the employment opportunities are as fantastic as you suggest).

    Two friends that studied psychology at university are working as teaching assistants at primary schools, and we have someone at work who studied it, did very well, and works as an appointments clerk. Obviously not everyone ends up that way, but merely doing a psychology BSc will barely get you anywhere because so many others do the same thing. You would have to take into account the cost of doing the BSc and then further study/graduate roles/apprenticeships afterwards. If you have a clear path in your mind and consider it to be worth the effort, then great, but going in just because you find it interesting and not thinking beyond that is a very easy way of getting into £40k of debt for no reason.

    Going to university is an expensive way of studying something you're interested in. I know that sounds a bit ridiculous, but you can study something you like in your spare time. Anyone can pick up a textbook. The idea of going to university is to get that piece of paper that gets you onto the first rung of the career ladder.

    If you want my opinion (for what it's worth) if your heart isn't in OT, I wouldn't do that, but I also wouldn't do psychology either, unless you have a path in mind (and a backup in case it goes balls up). Take another year out if you have to, better to do that and use it to gain other experiences than to waste 3 years and risk a load of debt piling up in the background. University isn't compulsory by any means.
    OT bein NHS funded is not the only reason why I've chose it. I enjoy helping people and making them happy because is a very rewarding experience. I've done some volunteering work in the Health care sector and found OT is the most versatile job because you have many different roles. So each day is never the same. That's one I the aspects I like about this job, if I had to do the same thug over and over I will get bored easily.

    Thank you for your advise. I appreciate you for telling me your honest opinion. Most people day go for what you enjoy but you're right if you don't have a clear path in mind then you are setting yourself back regardless. Opting for OT, the path is very clear for me. There's was a reason why I chose OT over psychology. I can always study psychology in my spare time as a hobby.

    Thanks!


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    To be honest I didn't find Psychology enlightening to a huge degree when I studied it at university. It was mostly a bunch of theories with little evidential legitimacy based on a truck load of ideas which couldn't really be tested properly. I switched after my first year and it was the best move I ever made. However, I would definitely enjoy a job as a clinical psychologist (neuropsychologist) and some parts of the degree were interesting/ useful. Degree level psychology is quite different to A level.
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    (Original post by Sophie1994)
    OT bein NHS funded is not the only reason why I've chose it. I enjoy helping people and making them happy because is a very rewarding experience. I've done some volunteering work in the Health care sector and found OT is the most versatile job because you have many different roles. So each day is never the same. That's one I the aspects I like about this job, if I had to do the same thug over and over I will get bored easily.

    Thank you for your advise. I appreciate you for telling me your honest opinion. Most people day go for what you enjoy but you're right if you don't have a clear path in mind then you are setting yourself back regardless. Opting for OT, the path is very clear for me. There's was a reason why I chose OT over psychology. I can always study psychology in my spare time as a hobby.

    Thanks!


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    I'm glad you took it the way I intended. You hear lots of stories of people who go to university and do nothing with degree they get at the end of it. It's silly making the same mistakes as everybody else.
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    (Original post by Sophie1994)
    I'm on my gap year right now. I've applied for Occupation Therapy at the University of Liverpool and will be starting in Sept 2015. The thing is that I'm having second thoughts about whether I really want to study OT for the next 3 years. The pros are that I don't have to pay a fee as the NHS will cover that for me and by the end of my degree, employment rates are high for OTs as the NHS is trying to keep people out of hospitals so that's where we come in. So I'm very likely to find job after I come out of Uni.

    On the plus side, I won't be burdened by the thoughts of having to repay my debt. I've been accepted onto the course already so all I have to do is enrol. However, I've always had an interest in psychology as I find learning about human behaviour and the mind very intriguing. I believe that I would enjoy psychology a lot more than OT.

    What should my next step be?
    It is worth pointing out that you will almost certainly cover some psychology in your degree. You will probably cover stuff to do with lifespan development, aging or personal identity.

    If they do not cover it explicitly then you will still have the opportunity to read relevant research and include it in your assessments (or perhaps a dissertation down the line). Pretty much all allied health professionals are big on psychology and social models of intervention.

    I think this is something you could actually ask the programme leader about. I am sure they would put your mind at rest.
 
 
 
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