Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Prepositions after verbs in French watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I really struggle remembering if à or de comes after a verb. What are good ways to help me learn? Are there any rules? Thankyou in advance.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi,
    It is tricky because there is absolutely no rule for which one should be used when. I printed myself a chart off and I'm gradually introducing each verb and it's preposition into my writing and speaking. I find that once I've used the verb and preposition in my work a few times, it becomes natural to use the correct preposition without thinking about it. Good luck!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chloe.connolly)
    Hi, I really struggle remembering if à or de comes after a verb. What are good ways to help me learn? Are there any rules? Thankyou in advance.
    As the person above said, it should just come to you by repetition.

    It doesn't help that sometimes they can both be used but give a different meaning. A good example is the verb penser - to think. Penser a (accent) means to think about i.e. I think about college often. Penser de also exists, and it means to think of, as in opinion-wise.

    Good luck
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: January 7, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.