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    I'm currently in the process of deciding what A levels to pick for sixth form college..
    I've decided that I will do Biology, Chemistry and Maths to get into either medicine or dentistry.
    My fourth option was originally History, as I was particularly interested in the 2nd unit, about Genghis Khan and I also love to write essays. But, I'm also hooked on choosing French at A level - I love French. I did it at GCSE and got an A*, one mark off full marks, so I consider that I'm quite good at it. But I'm not a native speaker and I've been told that it's completely different to GCSE level, which I understand but I've heard something else too. Is it true that for the speaking part, you literally have 20 minutes prior the exam to come up with your speech? Apparently there is no prior planning, etc!?

    The great (but slightly saddening) thing is that I will probably be the only one doing choosing French, so I guess I'l be having a lot of lonely lessons but in a way I'll be focused on to prepare for the exams. So, sorry for the overly long essay, but can anybody who has done A Level French before describe the course for me? Like the topics and the actual layout, etc?

    I'm thinking of taking French at AS, not as a full A Level but details of both will be highly relevant! Thank you!!
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    (Original post by latenightmadness)
    I'm currently in the process of deciding what A levels to pick for sixth form college..
    I've decided that I will do Biology, Chemistry and Maths to get into either medicine or dentistry.
    My fourth option was originally History, as I was particularly interested in the 2nd unit, about Genghis Khan and I also love to write essays. But, I'm also hooked on choosing French at A level - I love French. I did it at GCSE and got an A*, one mark off full marks, so I consider that I'm quite good at it. But I'm not a native speaker and I've been told that it's completely different to GCSE level, which I understand but I've heard something else too. Is it true that for the speaking part, you literally have 20 minutes prior the exam to come up with your speech? Apparently there is no prior planning, etc!?

    The great (but slightly saddening) thing is that I will probably be the only one doing choosing French, so I guess I'l be having a lot of lonely lessons but in a way I'll be focused on to prepare for the exams. So, sorry for the overly long essay, but can anybody who has done A Level French before describe the course for me? Like the topics and the actual layout, etc?

    I'm thinking of taking French at AS, not as a full A Level but details of both will be highly relevant! Thank you!!
    Speaking as a current A level student, it's really up to you whether you do it or not. In general, French AS is a big step up, in terms of work load and difficulty, there's no denying it. You'll have to put a lot more effort to get anywhere close to full marks, and it can be a shock. That said, I kept it on for A level, and I'm really glad I did - the material is more interesting with some literature, the workload and difficulty is actually less than at AS level (perversely). And as with any language, everything you learn is useful, and I'm so glad I've got to the stage where I could go to foreign countries and kind of muddle through - it's a great feeling to have that skill. French is a rewarding subject to do... if you put the work in. You can't wing it, like some other subjects. I hope you go for it, tbh, and it always looks good to unis/employers if you study/have studied a language properly.
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    (Original post by Actaeon)
    Speaking as a current A level student, it's really up to you whether you do it or not. In general, French AS is a big step up, in terms of work load and difficulty, there's no denying it. You'll have to put a lot more effort to get anywhere close to full marks, and it can be a shock. That said, I kept it on for A level, and I'm really glad I did - the material is more interesting with some literature, the workload and difficulty is actually less than at AS level (perversely). And as with any language, everything you learn is useful, and I'm so glad I've got to the stage where I could go to foreign countries and kind of muddle through - it's a great feeling to have that skill. French is a rewarding subject to do... if you put the work in. You can't wing it, like some other subjects. I hope you go for it, tbh, and it always looks good to unis/employers if you study/have studied a language properly.
    Oh wow, that's weird how A level is easier than French
    But thank you, I appreciate it Do a lot of people in your school pick French at A level?
    If you don't mind me asking, what subjects are you currently doing?
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    (Original post by latenightmadness)
    Oh wow, that's weird how A level is easier than French
    But thank you, I appreciate it Do a lot of people in your school pick French at A level?
    If you don't mind me asking, what subjects are you currently doing?
    About 20/30 odd for AS level, generally half of whom keep it on for A level. The numbers have been increasing, it used to have a far smaller uptake than that. And I'm currently doing Physics, Maths, Further Maths, French and Music - French and Music are my two contrasting "relaxed" subjects. Though they probably require more actual work in practice.
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    I'm also doing A2 and AS is a step up from GCSE - but if you're good at learning grammar and vocab it's actually in some ways easier than GCSE. A lot of GCSE grammar I had to learn myself, at my secondary school the teaching was all over the place. At college however, by the end of the year you will have been taught so much that you'll know all the grammar and you'll be able to speak properly with a lot more complexity. In my exam (AQA), you did the listening bit with headphones and you have free control of the voice recording file, all the questions are centred around the topics you have studied and you don't get stupid questions about a text explaining how a dog jumped on the metro (which was a genuine question in my GCSE no word of a lie), so you know a lot of the vocab. As for writing, yes we had to write 250+ words in an hour with no dictionary but by the time you have finished the year you'll know how to write a proper text.
    The speaking is a challenge because, shock horror, you have to talk off the cuff without reading off a sheet. I won't sugar coat that because everyone finds it hard.
    Honestly all you have to do is work hard at it, like anything.
    A2 is a bit different (for my exam board anyway) and like all other A levels subjects this part is harder, but you might get to results day and find you might not want to do it. However you might get a choice of what you want to study for it


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    I got an A in french a level and really a2 is much more enjoyable than AS, AS for me was all about just really expanding your grammar and vocab, and then a2 you actually got to do interesting stuff (debating woo)
    like in AS it is difficult, and tbf throughout a levels I probably found it my most difficult subject (I have a very maths-y mind), but worth it imo,
    also, I think once I realised that really learning the vocab (as opposed to learning it well enough to pass the vocab test in the next class then forgetting it) was actually very useful, I found it much easier
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    (Original post by Actaeon)
    About 20/30 odd for AS level, generally half of whom keep it on for A level. The numbers have been increasing, it used to have a far smaller uptake than that. And I'm currently doing Physics, Maths, Further Maths, French and Music - French and Music are my two contrasting "relaxed" subjects. Though they probably require more actual work in practice.
    Oh, that's quite good then because there's only been 2 people this year and one next year & that's a good combination - good luck!
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    (Original post by adstratt)
    I'm also doing A2 and AS is a step up from GCSE - but if you're good at learning grammar and vocab it's actually in some ways easier than GCSE. A lot of GCSE grammar I had to learn myself, at my secondary school the teaching was all over the place. At college however, by the end of the year you will have been taught so much that you'll know all the grammar and you'll be able to speak properly with a lot more complexity. In my exam (AQA), you did the listening bit with headphones and you have free control of the voice recording file, all the questions are centred around the topics you have studied and you don't get stupid questions about a text explaining how a dog jumped on the metro (which was a genuine question in my GCSE no word of a lie), so you know a lot of the vocab. As for writing, yes we had to write 250+ words in an hour with no dictionary but by the time you have finished the year you'll know how to write a proper text.
    The speaking is a challenge because, shock horror, you have to talk off the cuff without reading off a sheet. I won't sugar coat that because everyone finds it hard.
    Honestly all you have to do is work hard at it, like anything.
    A2 is a bit different (for my exam board anyway) and like all other A levels subjects this part is harder, but you might get to results day and find you might not want to do it. However you might get a choice of what you want to study for it

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    Wow, thanks. Yeah I'm strong at learning vocabulary and okay at grammar The listening sounds great& wow, was that genuinely a question?:mmm:
    Gosh, that's what I'm dreading: doing the speaking and writing off the top of your head. Wish I was a native speaker. Yeah, I don't think I'll be doing the A2 though. Thankss
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    (Original post by hestermae)
    I got an A in french a level and really a2 is much more enjoyable than AS, AS for me was all about just really expanding your grammar and vocab, and then a2 you actually got to do interesting stuff (debating woo)
    like in AS it is difficult, and tbf throughout a levels I probably found it my most difficult subject (I have a very maths-y mind), but worth it imo,
    also, I think once I realised that really learning the vocab (as opposed to learning it well enough to pass the vocab test in the next class then forgetting it) was actually very useful, I found it much easier
    Thank you! Oooh, I think I'd prefer AS over A2 tbh, I struggle to debate in English, let alone French hahaha
    Like I mentioned earlier I think I'll be fine with vocabulary so that's good
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    (Original post by latenightmadness)
    Thank you! Oooh, I think I'd prefer AS over A2 tbh, I struggle to debate in English, let alone French hahaha
    Like I mentioned earlier I think I'll be fine with vocabulary so that's good
    I still cant really debate in english haha, but I have it down in french, you get taught techniques and stuff and it makes it easier
    like anything that is difficult (like speaking in general) will be gone over a lot, until you can do it (well if you have a good teacher :P )
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    (Original post by hestermae)
    I still cant really debate in english haha, but I have it down in french, you get taught techniques and stuff and it makes it easier
    like anything that is difficult (like speaking in general) will be gone over a lot, until you can do it (well if you have a good teacher :P )
    Ooh that's good then
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    i do AS level French and Spanish and I love French. It is a huge step up from GCSE and can be daunting and even disheartening when your teacher sets you work and you can't understand half of it but thats what language A levels are like to start. It's really up to you. It's a respectable A level but you have to put the work and be prepared to memorise all of the tenses (plus new ones); a vast amount of new grammar and a lot of new verbs. I enjoy it though it's my favourite A level at the moment
 
 
 
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