Gspino
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Hi everyone!
I am international relations undergraduate student (from Italy) at Sciences Po Paris and right now I am on exchange at UC Berkeley.
I realized that I want to study international law (and I have already taken several law courses), but in order to apply for a master in this domain I need an LLB or a GDL.
As I do not want to spend another three years on a LLB, I thought it would be a better idea to apply for a Senior Status LLB (two years).
Among the available choices, I found that the program offered by SOAS was more suitable for my career plans, as it has a more international character.
I also study Arabic and I am very interested in the Middle East, reason why SOAS seems to be a good fit for me and would probably offer me many resources from this point of view.
However, I am a bit skeptical about the reputation of SOAS, especially in the past years, and the future of this institution does not seem to be rosy either.

Do you think SOAS is still good? What about its law program?
I have offers from other university, higher in international rankings, but the idea of studying in London and in a university specialized in oriental studies seems very appealing.

Thank you
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SOASllbsurvivor
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Aside from the fact that the legal jobs market in Britain is rubbish right now, I can think of a number of reasons why you shouldn't spend 2 years (or 3) at SOAS. In truth, there's only one good reason to do that whole 'go to law school and become a lawyer' thing- if mum/dad/aunty/uncle is an equity partner already. Unless you fit this description, you will quite likely find out why more law graduates are outside of the profession than in it.

SOAS is especially poor though as far as London law schools go. Although the faculty may be the world's premier experts on Asian and African legal issues, many of them are just plain terrible people. If you ask for assistance of any sort (like research advice or help setting up a law review or pro bono society) you will be ridiculed by staff and sent to someone else. (This doesn't happen at UCL, QMU, or Kings- faculty go to great lengths to assist students and build good programs to help students excel.) Think 'Brazil' or Kafka but with personal insults constantly hurled at you. Worse yet, you will possibly even get an email about it on account of the faculty not knowing what 'reply all' means. On the plus side, you get to know what they truly think about you. In other words, basic students needs are seriously neglected in addition to students just being treated like rubbish.

Worse yet, the employment picture from SOAS is bad as far as law goes. How many SOAS alumni are partners at top firms? I have yet to find one. In spite of this, the school is keen to harp on how many grads go on to top firms as trainees. The majority of them don't come from the law school though, they read economics or Arabic. None of them stay on with those firms as associates either.

The brand recognition for SOAS isn't good in any event. It's a small school with a very niche interest that doesn't make a lot of impact outside of academia. Such specialization doesn't help either, as its hard to find an employer with such narrow needs and interests. Of the people that I finished SOAS law with, more of them ended up having mental breakdowns than ever getting a training contract. Some are paralegals or legal executives, but you don't even need to go to uni to do that.

As a result, student morale is pretty low. It certainly was when I was there.

Seriously though, don't go to SOAS. It isn't a good school, it is not a good environment or experience, and it will not get you where you need to go. It as an ordeal that grants you a worthless piece of paper.
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jakepro94
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^^ Very interesting, insightful post. Whether that user is a troll or just had an overall poor experience, it seems pretty legit.

I'm an applicant currently awaiting an offer from SOAS. When I applied I didn't really research thoroughly, neither did I browse these forums for experiences at SOAS. I just assumed it was a good university due to its reputation and some other recommendations from students who never attended SOAS (but applied). Its unique courses and seemingly eccentric/political social groups does seem appealing.

After reading the post above and evaluating the choices I made and received offers from (City, Goldsmiths and Greenwich), I'm starting to wish I applied for King's or UCL. I have applied for LSE but I'm likely to get a rejection, and SOAS is essentially my only (decent) choice (if I manage to get an offer).

Anyway, SOAS' reputation has been declining rapidly. Its social structure and casual approach, as well as its London location may seem appealing but I would definitely assess all of your choices and decide which university will give you more credibility as a job applicant.
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Gspino
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Thank you for your reply. From what you are saying, SOAS sounds much worse than I expected.
I found this school appealing because of its focus on the Middle East and its location in a resourceful city as London, but after doing some research I may reconsider my initial choice.

I could apply to better universities (as you mentioned KCL and UCL) which offer a 3-year LLB, but as I am already getting a BA from another institution this year, the 2-year senior status LLB seemed to be a very convenient option.
The graduate entry LLB is also offered by other universities such as Nottingham, Birmingham, and QMUL. What do you think of them?
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Guills on wheels
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(Original post by Gspino)
Thank you for your reply. From what you are saying, SOAS sounds much worse than I expected.
I found this school appealing because of its focus on the Middle East and its location in a resourceful city as London, but after doing some research I may reconsider my initial choice.

I could apply to better universities (as you mentioned KCL and UCL) which offer a 3-year LLB, but as I am already getting a BA from another institution this year, the 2-year senior status LLB seemed to be a very convenient option.
The graduate entry LLB is also offered by other universities such as Nottingham, Birmingham, and QMUL. What do you think of them?
I'm slightly suspicious, since there's just been a post on a 2 year old thread bad-mouthing SOAS, then suddenly there's a very similar post asking if SOAS is any good, with similar characteristics in the questions the OPs ask.

Then, suddenly there's someone who just made an account to answer this question who must have just happened to be googling their old university, which is odd considering how much they supposedly hate it, and felt the conviction to make a TSR account called SOASllbsurvivor and write a very long post on it. All in all, it appears the OP is spiteful about something and wants to bad-mouth SOAS, through a second account.

In fact, everyone here is a new member.

"I'm starting to wish I applied to King's or UCL"

this sounds like a ****ing orchestrated advert.
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Gspino
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Well the first reply sounded a bit suspicious to me, but I really need advice from other students. It is not fair to accuse me of being a fake with bad intentions just because my account is new - it's new because I am an international student applying for university in the UK for the first time.
I did not have any prejudice against SOAS, which as I said I find appealing because of its locations and its focus on the Middle East. I was only seeking some clarifications, as I had read other negative reviews about this institution, which is also going down in rankings.
If you have something positive to say about SOAS I am more than happy to hear your view, which may help me in my final decision. In the end I also included SOAS among my choices and I will now be awaiting a response.

(Original post by Guills on wheels)
I'm slightly suspicious, since there's just been a post on a 2 year old thread bad-mouthing SOAS, then suddenly there's a very similar post asking if SOAS is any good, with similar characteristics in the questions the OPs ask.

Then, suddenly there's someone who just made an account to answer this question who must have just happened to be googling their old university, which is odd considering how much they supposedly hate it, and felt the conviction to make a TSR account called SOASllbsurvivor and write a very long post on it. All in all, it appears the OP is spiteful about something and wants to bad-mouth SOAS, through a second account.

In fact, everyone here is a new member.

"I'm starting to wish I applied to King's or UCL"

this sounds like a ****ing orchestrated advert.
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Horse273
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(Original post by Gspino)
Well the first reply sounded a bit suspicious to me, but I really need advice from other students. It is not fair to accuse me of being a fake with bad intentions just because my account is new - it's new because I am an international student applying for university in the UK for the first time.
I did not have any prejudice against SOAS, which as I said I find appealing because of its locations and its focus on the Middle East. I was only seeking some clarifications, as I had read other negative reviews about this institution, which is also going down in rankings.
If you have something positive to say about SOAS I am more than happy to hear your view, which may help me in my final decision. In the end I also included SOAS among my choices and I will now be awaiting a response.
Well the guy who ranted about SOAS's law department seems to have an agenda. I'm studying there now and I've had no problems in the vac scheme hunt (one MC offer, 3 other MC interviews). Sure there aren't many SOAS City lawyers because quite frankly not many SOAS law grads apply to City firms. I can also personally vouch for there being associates at MC firms from SOAS, having done a placement at two of these firms.

The school isn't opposed to promoting student initiatives either and I've seen the pro bono (advice at a Camden community centre) and law journal activities spring up during my time here. You can participate even as a first year for the journal in its editing process, so whatever that guy was ranting about is clearly irrelevant as far as the current status of the faculty is concerned.

And if you're doing law, the market isn't that bad. If you do your research, attend open days/insight schemes/have a 2:1 and tailor your applications, there's no reason why your chances should be as bleak as he/she makes it out to be.

Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions about SOAS law.
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ontrack7
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I am also interested to know more about law at SOAS. Are you an undergraduate or postgraduate student there? Also am not familiar with law terms what did you mean when you said MC?

You said SOAS law students usually don't apply to city firms? So what are their career destinations? I am curious as I would want to know if law at the university is more suited to those wanting to practice law in foreign countries.

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ontrack7
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(Original post by Horse273)
Well the guy who ranted about SOAS's law department seems to have an agenda. I'm studying there now and I've had no problems in the vac scheme hunt (one MC offer, 3 other MC interviews). Sure there aren't many SOAS City lawyers because quite frankly not many SOAS law grads apply to City firms. I can also personally vouch for there being associates at MC firms from SOAS, having done a placement at two of these firms.

The school isn't opposed to promoting student initiatives either and I've seen the pro bono (advice at a Camden community centre) and law journal activities spring up during my time here. You can participate even as a first year for the journal in its editing process, so whatever that guy was ranting about is clearly irrelevant as far as the current status of the faculty is concerned.

And if you're doing law, the market isn't that bad. If you do your research, attend open days/insight schemes/have a 2:1 and tailor your applications, there's no reason why your chances should be as bleak as he/she makes it out to be.

Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions about SOAS law.
I am also interested to know more about law at SOAS. Are you an undergraduate or postgraduate student there? Also am not familiar with law terms what did you mean when you said MC?

You said SOAS law students usually don't apply to city firms? So what are their career destinations? I am curious as I would want to know if law at the university is more suited to those wanting to practice law in foreign countries.


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SOASllbsurvivor
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The reason I have an axe to grind with SOAS is because my experience there was so poor, my relationship with the faculty was so hostile and my opinion about the value of my high 2:1 degree is so very low.

I understand that after I spent 2 solid years agitating (along with other people) the faculty stepped up and actually did something to improve morale and assist students with employment and student activities... because the school tumbled in the rankings. Oh, and all the complaints to the universities ombudsman that were not in their favour. Unfortunately I wasn't there to see them get a law review running, and as near as I can tell the bar society and mooting efforts have been allowed to wither. If it takes 5 years of fighting to get faculty to advise students, what does that really say about a uni? It isn't a good uni or law school.

Trust me mate, there is no shortage of SOAS students applying to City firms. None. Whoever told you that is bloody well lying through their teeth. I know one woman I graduated with is still wasting her time trying to get a training contract with anyone all these years later, and she has a *first* class degree in law from SOAS. I have personally done more applications than I care to count and ultimately gave up and became a journalist and author. The pay is rubbish, but at least I'm not asleep trying to live my 'dreams'.

SOAS students apply to City firms, but very few of them even get an interview unless they're fundamentalist Islamist Asian boys that happen to be in the good graces of certain faculty. These people get shepherded in and end up getting kicked out of places like Clifford & Chance for going on screeds against Jews and supporting terrorists. Don't believe me? It happened this week: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...s-9989396.html

As for you, well, congratulations on getting open day invites and everything else. There's a lot of reputational consideration involved in making the cut for those sorts of things, and I think the faculty have made an effort to fix the lack of footprint SOAS had in the City. Unfortunately, they picked some bad eggs to back as you can see from above. I think my point still stands though as far as SOAS' impact at top firms. For a "top law school", there are VERY few alumni practising as solicitors in Magic Cirlce. I know of none who are partners, although you seem to insist on the contrary provided you know the difference as you are the proverbial fresh meat for the grinder.

If you enjoy SOAS, good for you. I didn't and I know very few classmates who did, so I have no love for that place. The Earth may swallow it whole and never give it back up again for all I care.
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Horse273
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(Original post by ontrack7)
I am also interested to know more about law at SOAS. Are you an undergraduate or postgraduate student there? Also am not familiar with law terms what did you mean when you said MC?

You said SOAS law students usually don't apply to city firms? So what are their career destinations? I am curious as I would want to know if law at the university is more suited to those wanting to practice law in foreign countries.


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I'm an undergrad. MC = Magic Circle, the five leading law firms in the UK. PM me to talk more about law here, don't fancy that guy ranting after my replies.
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Horse273
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(Original post by SOASllbsurvivor)
The reason I have an axe to grind with SOAS is because my experience there was so poor, my relationship with the faculty was so hostile and my opinion about the value of my high 2:1 degree is so very low.

I understand that after I spent 2 solid years agitating (along with other people) the faculty stepped up and actually did something to improve morale and assist students with employment and student activities... because the school tumbled in the rankings. Oh, and all the complaints to the universities ombudsman that were not in their favour. Unfortunately I wasn't there to see them get a law review running, and as near as I can tell the bar society and mooting efforts have been allowed to wither. If it takes 5 years of fighting to get faculty to advise students, what does that really say about a uni? It isn't a good uni or law school.

Trust me mate, there is no shortage of SOAS students applying to City firms. None. Whoever told you that is bloody well lying through their teeth. I know one woman I graduated with is still wasting her time trying to get a training contract with anyone all these years later, and she has a *first* class degree in law from SOAS. I have personally done more applications than I care to count and ultimately gave up and became a journalist and author. The pay is rubbish, but at least I'm not asleep trying to live my 'dreams'.

SOAS students apply to City firms, but very few of them even get an interview unless they're fundamentalist Islamist Asian boys that happen to be in the good graces of certain faculty. These people get shepherded in and end up getting kicked out of places like Clifford & Chance for going on screeds against Jews and supporting terrorists. Don't believe me? It happened this week: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...s-9989396.html

As for you, well, congratulations on getting open day invites and everything else. There's a lot of reputational consideration involved in making the cut for those sorts of things, and I think the faculty have made an effort to fix the lack of footprint SOAS had in the City. Unfortunately, they picked some bad eggs to back as you can see from above. I think my point still stands though as far as SOAS' impact at top firms. For a "top law school", there are VERY few alumni practising as solicitors in Magic Cirlce. I know of none who are partners, although you seem to insist on the contrary provided you know the difference as you are the proverbial fresh meat for the grinder.

If you enjoy SOAS, good for you. I didn't and I know very few classmates who did, so I have no love for that place. The Earth may swallow it whole and never give it back up again for all I care. Especially the ****** who became the head of the law school.
You seem like a zealot on a mission to take down the school - even your username reflects that.

The law journal is actually doing pretty well, with sponsorship from CC. And just because you have a 1st, it doesn't guarantee a TC. If you think academics alone are enough, then clearly you're missing the point. For my vac scheme interview I was in a group of three, the other 2 being Oxbridge. Didn't see that hampering my chances of an offer.

Anecdotal evidence doesn't represent the whole student body. Out of the friends in my year with an offer/interviews, none of them are 'fundamental muslims'. A similar event happened last year with a trainee from Oxford and I don't see that stopping them from being a top law school. And you mentioned a lack of associates from SOAS, as well as partners in your last post, which is completely and utterly wrong.

For all the time you spend ranting on about the school, how about getting advice from people (on TSR or otherwise) on how to get a TC?
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SOASllbsurvivor
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My life is far more interesting than that of a zealot. I do other things a plenty, but given the opportunity I will gladly trash SOAS in the form of advice. It isn't a good school. I guess the new generation stands on the shoulders of the neglected and abused classes that came before it. I was in a tough window of time, however. After 2008, firms canceled internships, summer schemes and TC intakes altogether. It was rough. Doesn't matter. I know how bad that place can be.

I've read the law review. It's just ok and highlights another problem at SOAS: It doesn't teach legal writing at all. The staff editors need to learn OSCOLA a little bit better and the ME needs to become anal about it because that's their bloody fooking job. Until then it will always look like a *very* student journal with student papers cut and pasted into it. It's a good enough start at least until practicing lawyers and scholars submit articles or notes, provided it doesn't wither on the vine. It would have been nice though if the faculty had been more supportive 5 years ago when we wanted to start that thing up. Instead, a certain criminal law lecturer called us idiots and children in the faculty meeting. Ask for help at SOAS? Nope. Figure out for yourself and hope there are no costs for you to eat.

As for TC apps, I've taken so much advice on those stupid things I don't want to ever think about it again. I used this forum back then under a different name btw. I want to let you in on a dirty secret- when firms get 100s of nearly identical applications, it really doesn't matter what you write. What matters is if somebody flags it. Those are the people who get interviewed. It isn't a meritocracy or even some lottery- it's about who you know. Don't be such a rube.

This is what SOAS faculty started doing- seeing to it that their people get flagged and prepping them for it. I ended up with a copy of the email they passed about amongst themselves in 2012. The DoE was scrutinizing new higher uni fees then and considering pairing it to employment outcomes, and they were scared. Since then, they've been playing nice with big firms and actually trying to shepherd more grads into actual jobs, ya know, since that's what every other uni in London has always done.

Sure, this is all anecdotal evidence. But so is everything else on this thread- including your glowing praise. If you don't believe me, go check if the higher education ombudsman complaints are open to the public. The law school had a pile of these to fight a few years ago. I know because I helped mates out with it and 2 of them won in a single year.

It definitely isn't the same school that I went to though. Aside from some new construction, Menski has retired and Huxley has passed away. Without these two there, that place must proper suck, particularly when you see the swine who ended up moving up the 'company ladder'.

As for international opportunities, I would say SOAS is worse than most London law schools in that regard as well. It's a small school, small alumni pool, and does nothing to promote its brand anywhere. I spent a lot of time in Singapore and Hong Kong doing odd jobs, this and that and had similar problems as in England. 'SOAS? What's that?' 'Is it a real uni?' I did find a few alumni in practice out there though, but they weren't able or willing to provide any meaningful assistance as far as careers go.
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Horse273
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You do realise that a student law journal is just that - it publishes selected submissions written by students? Have a look at Oxford's Undergraduate law journal, which does the same thing.

Thanks for the tip but I've done fairly well in the progress without your little cynical application advice. Of course you have to stand out. I've been to events and impressed people there enough to then be invited for dinner with associates and graduate recruitment. That's just one example and I've done numerous other things to stand out. No one said this process was easy.

Your tone and bitterness is all too apparent. 2008 was a rough time and many other people at other unis struggled too. Making an account dedicated to trashing your university is, quite frankly, sad.
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SOASllbsurvivor
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When I pitched the idea, I thought it could be more than that and cater to the niche (or niches depending on how you see it) that SOAS serves. I envisioned something more along the lines of Australian and American university law reviews that are entirely edited and sometimes written by students, but mostly feature submissions by staff and practicing attorneys. These journals are highly regarded, teach valuable legal writing skills to students and are very prized appointments that lead to prestigious appointments after university. Unfortunately we were told to go kick rocks in about as many words and I focused my efforts elsewhere, namely mooting.

Yeah, the late 00s and after were a grim time. Having to deal with a completely toxic atmosphere at SOAS didn't help, and neither did having to go it alone. You keep cheerleading the place uncritically though. All that arse kissing might serve you well since there's nothing to lose and it's all being handed to you. Or maybe it still seriously sucks and you're just one of the few singled out as a pet or sorts.

Caveat emptor, fellow plebs. Caveat emptor.
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flanham
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(Original post by SOASllbsurvivor)
When I pitched the idea, I thought it could be more than that and cater to the niche (or niches depending on how you see it) that SOAS serves. I envisioned something more along the lines of Australian and American university law reviews that are entirely edited and sometimes written by students, but mostly feature submissions by staff and practicing attorneys. These journals are highly regarded, teach valuable legal writing skills to students and are very prized appointments that lead to prestigious appointments after university. Unfortunately we were told to go kick rocks in about as many words and I focused my efforts elsewhere, namely mooting.

Yeah, the late 00s and after were a grim time. Having to deal with a completely toxic atmosphere at SOAS didn't help, and neither did having to go it alone. You keep cheerleading the place uncritically though. All that arse kissing might serve you well since there's nothing to lose and it's all being handed to you. Or maybe it still seriously sucks and you're just one of the few singled out as a pet or sorts.

Caveat emptor, fellow plebs. Caveat emptor.
I just don't understand your motivation for this kind of trashiness? I know several SOAS graduates (one of which did law) and say completely different things that you have. You seem to think you're the most honest with your criticism, but in reality, it is coming across as some butthurt, unsuccessful, unmotivated, and depressed person who happened to be at SOAS.

If you're going to be critical about a place, be real and be constructive. Using words like toxic and putrid are dramatic, hyperbolic, and don't help anyone.

Sorry your life hasn't panned out like you wanted it to, but it seems rather than blaming yourself or your own failings, you need to find something else to blame. Wake up bub.
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luq_ali
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A note to readers of any post by this SOASllbsurvivor:

There will always be racist trolls on every message board, there will always be
those around who are racist and white supremacist in their world view. Obviously one must take into consideration, when reading the writings of such idiots, the
place in the darkness they are coming from. In the case of this racist person,
SOASllbsurvivor, his own words are his worst enemy. Remember-you are here to
learn about perspectives, to read from the writings of the posters that you might
be reasonably informed. Everyone will NOT have a positive view, or vice versa.
That is to be expected and is fine. Let us some of this clown, SOASllbsurvivor
with just the last words of his post:

"If you enjoy SOAS, good for you. I didn't and I know very few classmates who did, so I have no love for that place. The Earth may swallow it whole and never give it back up again for all I care. Especially the ****** who became the head of the law school."

Now, lets see, at one point in time, Mashood Baderin, was the head of the law
school, who is Black. So when this racist person says the "******" who became
head of the law school, well, that should tell you as much as you need to
know about this clown, his(or her) perspective, worldview, tolerance, etc. No
wonder a bottom feeding urchin such as this (no offense to urchins) has had
such a difficult time finding work, seems this person should try to go to a firm
in the snows of the North pole so he can be surrounded by all-white. LOL!!!


(Original post by SOASllbsurvivor)
The reason I have an axe to grind with SOAS is because my experience there was so poor, my relationship with the faculty was so hostile and my opinion about the value of my high 2:1 degree is so very low.

I understand that after I spent 2 solid years agitating (along with other people) the faculty stepped up and actually did something to improve morale and assist students with employment and student activities... because the school tumbled in the rankings. Oh, and all the complaints to the universities ombudsman that were not in their favour. Unfortunately I wasn't there to see them get a law review running, and as near as I can tell the bar society and mooting efforts have been allowed to wither. If it takes 5 years of fighting to get faculty to advise students, what does that really say about a uni? It isn't a good uni or law school.

Trust me mate, there is no shortage of SOAS students applying to City firms. None. Whoever told you that is bloody well lying through their teeth. I know one woman I graduated with is still wasting her time trying to get a training contract with anyone all these years later, and she has a *first* class degree in law from SOAS. I have personally done more applications than I care to count and ultimately gave up and became a journalist and author. The pay is rubbish, but at least I'm not asleep trying to live my 'dreams'.

SOAS students apply to City firms, but very few of them even get an interview unless they're fundamentalist Islamist Asian boys that happen to be in the good graces of certain faculty. These people get shepherded in and end up getting kicked out of places like Clifford & Chance for going on screeds against Jews and supporting terrorists. Don't believe me? It happened this week: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...s-9989396.html

As for you, well, congratulations on getting open day invites and everything else. There's a lot of reputational consideration involved in making the cut for those sorts of things, and I think the faculty have made an effort to fix the lack of footprint SOAS had in the City. Unfortunately, they picked some bad eggs to back as you can see from above. I think my point still stands though as far as SOAS' impact at top firms. For a "top law school", there are VERY few alumni practising as solicitors in Magic Cirlce. I know of none who are partners, although you seem to insist on the contrary provided you know the difference as you are the proverbial fresh meat for the grinder.

If you enjoy SOAS, good for you. I didn't and I know very few classmates who did, so I have no love for that place. The Earth may swallow it whole and never give it back up again for all I care. Especially the ****** who became the head of the law school.
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luq_ali
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Wow, what a cave person you are, no wonder you have had such misery and
lack of success in your legal career, clearly upon first meeting you, the vibe
and credibility you throw off, that must be very visible to recruiters and
employers, and perhaps the only person you have to blame is yourself. We see from your comments below that you are a racist, referring to "the ****** who
became head of the law school" (I presume referring to Prof. Baderin who was
for a time head of the law school, now it is Ms. Tan, man, I would hate to
imagine what racist as heck things or racial epithets you would throw at her.)
So we already know all we need to know about you, your perspectives, your
"insights"-or "mindset" (ah, that you are a lunatic and raving idiot who needs
to go and law down in the snow in the North Pole so you can be surrounded
by all-white! LOL!!!) I like everyone else, came here to learn and seek
information feedback...I noticed you were negative in all your posts about
SOAS Law, and that is fine, people will have varying degrees of success, or
have varying aspects to their educational experiences, I know people who
have been to Oxford, Cambridge, Yale, Harvard, Michigan, Georgetown and
other top-tier law schools who hated, and of course, we know lots of people
love it. Those things, and all in between or at other extremes, are fine. But to
come on here, making racist comments-something I noticed you did in other
posts (though not as blatantly as here), well, that tells us about all we need to
know about you. Full disclosure, I am going to SOAS' LLM program this fall,
looking forward to, already self-employed in my own consulting practice, so
maybe I am in a slightly different place in terms of not worrying about a job
afterwards, which is a reasonable concern, of course, just doesn't apply to me.


(Original post by SOASllbsurvivor)
The reason I have an axe to grind with SOAS is because my experience there was so poor, my relationship with the faculty was so hostile and my opinion about the value of my high 2:1 degree is so very low.

I understand that after I spent 2 solid years agitating (along with other people) the faculty stepped up and actually did something to improve morale and assist students with employment and student activities... because the school tumbled in the rankings. Oh, and all the complaints to the universities ombudsman that were not in their favour. Unfortunately I wasn't there to see them get a law review running, and as near as I can tell the bar society and mooting efforts have been allowed to wither. If it takes 5 years of fighting to get faculty to advise students, what does that really say about a uni? It isn't a good uni or law school.

Trust me mate, there is no shortage of SOAS students applying to City firms. None. Whoever told you that is bloody well lying through their teeth. I know one woman I graduated with is still wasting her time trying to get a training contract with anyone all these years later, and she has a *first* class degree in law from SOAS. I have personally done more applications than I care to count and ultimately gave up and became a journalist and author. The pay is rubbish, but at least I'm not asleep trying to live my 'dreams'.

SOAS students apply to City firms, but very few of them even get an interview unless they're fundamentalist Islamist Asian boys that happen to be in the good graces of certain faculty. These people get shepherded in and end up getting kicked out of places like Clifford & Chance for going on screeds against Jews and supporting terrorists. Don't believe me? It happened this week: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...s-9989396.html

As for you, well, congratulations on getting open day invites and everything else. There's a lot of reputational consideration involved in making the cut for those sorts of things, and I think the faculty have made an effort to fix the lack of footprint SOAS had in the City. Unfortunately, they picked some bad eggs to back as you can see from above. I think my point still stands though as far as SOAS' impact at top firms. For a "top law school", there are VERY few alumni practising as solicitors in Magic Cirlce. I know of none who are partners, although you seem to insist on the contrary provided you know the difference as you are the proverbial fresh meat for the grinder.

If you enjoy SOAS, good for you. I didn't and I know very few classmates who did, so I have no love for that place. The Earth may swallow it whole and never give it back up again for all I care. Especially the ****** who became the head of the law school.
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