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Why do you support UKIP? watch

  • View Poll Results: Will you be voting for UKIP in May?
    Yes
    7
    46.67%
    No - voting for another party
    7
    46.67%
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    I live in Northern Ireland; I guess our biggest worry in the world of politics is whether Stormont will get their **** together. (That's a generalised worry. Right now it's all about whether all the parties will ratify their latest agreement, which only Sinn Fein has done.)

    So, why do people in mainland UK support UKIP? Is it largely on their European policy ie getting out of the EU and stamping down on immigrants getting into the UK? Or does it go further than that? Are they really seen to be a new version of the Conservatives? I'm really curious on this matter. Will you be voting for them in May?

    Please, no bashing. Keep it clean.
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    I don't support them as their view on Europe, energy, most of immigration and the stigma of being a UKIP supporter are all dealbreakers for me, but a lot of their other official policies are quite good. link
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    I believe that uncontrolled immigration has been and will be the single biggest issues facing the UK in the time of this general election. I am against uncontrolled immigration and so will be voting UKIP I expect.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    I believe that uncontrolled immigration has been and will be the single biggest issues facing the UK in the time of this general election. I am against uncontrolled immigration and so will be voting UKIP I expect.
    Do you believe then that most people will vote for them due to their stance on immigration only? Not regard their domestic policies?
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    (Original post by CescaD96)
    Do you believe then that most people will vote for them due to their stance on immigration only?
    Yes
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    I don't support them as their view on Europe, energy, most of immigration and the stigma of being a UKIP supporter are all dealbreakers for me, but a lot of their other official policies are quite good. link
    So you agree with more of the domestic policies then? (I've read them, I will admit some make perfect sense.)
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    Their domestic policies seem broadly sensible, but I'm voting for the EU policy.
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    (Original post by CescaD96)
    So you agree with more of the domestic policies then? (I've read them, I will admit some make perfect sense.)
    Yeah, their views on education, healthcare, tax, foreign aid and welfare seem like quite good ideas, heck even on immigration they have a couple of good points such as to give good incentives for skilled workers, although they could probably qualify the free tuition fees a bit better to say whether that includes international students.
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    I joined ukip last year so will definitely be voting for them
    Getting a referendum on the EU and controlling our borders properly are big factors in why I decided to join, but having looked at their wider range of policies on their website, they seemed like a very good party indeed. Add that to how impressed I was by some of Nigel Farage's speeches (I really felt he spoke for the majority of people in this country and showed up the career politicians for how disconnected they are with the electorate) and it became a question of how can I not vote for UKIP. LibLabCon are all the same, they are self-serving corporatists, and the Green party are socialists who seem to have some very good ideas on how to bankrupt the country in a record amount of time. So who else is there really?

    UKIP are often reported unfairly by the media, so its no surprise that there is a conception that we only have two policies, but that's not the case. We have many, and we will have many more announced over the coming weeks.
    I have seen many people, other students in particular it seems, get annoyed with UKIP for their energy policies, such as wanting to abolish green taxes and subsidies. I actually think these policies are very sensible, as green taxes are damaging for business (when combined with the heavy regulation enforced by the EU and the government, it is no wonder our economy seems to be struggling) and forcing the country into inefficient means of energy production like the rather useless wind turbines is driving up everyone's energy bills and adding to poverty in this country. Coming from a poor background myself, I can fully appreciate what energy poverty is like and why this country needs to do more to address it. As far as I am aware, LibLabCon don't have any plans to address it, and the Greens will make it worse, much worse. So that just leaves UKIP. Now for the killer point. As a country, the UK only produces about 3% of global carbon emissions, so why should we cripple our economy and force our poorest people into energy poverty when we have China and India building four coal-fired power stations every week, and even if we woke up to a carbon-neutral Britain tomorrow, it would make very little difference. For stating these arguments, I have repeatedly been called a "climate-change denier". Well, no I don't deny climate change. I am however unsure that it is caused by human activity, as the planet has always gone through natural temperature changes, and even if it is caused by human activity, it seems like there is very little that the UK can do about it for the time being.

    I am a fan of UKIP's tax policy as well. No tax on the minimum wage seems like a much better solution than the Green Party's insane £10 minimum wage (bye bye small businesses) and I think that inheritance tax is nothing short of a scandal, so I fully support getting rid of that. Also with regards to the minimum wage, with a somewhat deregulated economy the like of which we would be likely to see under a UKIP government, the cost of living in general would be likely to reduce quite significantly, so increasing the minimum wage is really not necessary, there are better, less damaging ways to deal with the problem.

    Scrapping HS2 seems sensible, as the whole thing is very expensive and I just don't think the benefits will outweigh the £80 billion cost.

    Cutting the foreign aid budget is also sensible in my view, we currently give way too much away; 0.7% of GDP is excessive to say the least. Only £2 billion of the foreign aid budget is given to humanitarian relief. We are currently giving money to dodgy regimes, and countries like India (with a space program) and Argentina, who would still love to get their hands on the Falklands.

    One of my favorite UKIP policies has to be giving pupils the chance to take an apprenticeship instead of 4 non-core GCSEs. This seems like a brilliant way to get youngsters the work experience and skills they need to find a job easily right at the start of their adult lives. I also agree that we should have a selective school in every town, this would reduce the education gap and make sure the most talented pupils can get access to top quality education instead of being left to rot in state-schools.

    Oh, and thank goodness that UKIP want to scrap that bedroom tax! I was forced to move house because of it, all it is is a clever way to knock poorer people out of decent housing so they can be replaced by some middle class people who in the eyes of the government are obviously better suited to that kind of housing. It has to be one of the most unfair taxes we have.

    So that's why I support UKIP, cut down to a few of their policies which I consider most important.
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    Aren't UKIP trying to get rid of the NHS?

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    (Original post by floppycatfish96)
    ...
    This.



    (Original post by Rhyss01)
    Aren't UKIP trying to get rid of the NHS?
    Nope, Nigel Farage bandied the idea around at a party meeting a few years back as a potential idea. Someone got hold of the video and blew it up to make it seem like UKIP as a party wanted to scrap the NHS. The party policy at this time is that the NHS will remain free to access and use, as it is in it's current form. There will be cuts to the areas of the NHS which don't affect the care that people will receive and to actually make the care more streamlined and efficient. Douglas Carswell even came out to say he'd like to see more spending on the NHS to support making the service more efficient while trying to cut the overall budget.

    But yes, I will be voting UKIP - I'm a party member and a member of the local constituency committee.
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    What's UKIP's stance on Northern Ireland?
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    (Original post by floppycatfish96)
    UKIP are often reported unfairly by the media, so its no surprise that there is a conception that we only have two policies, but that's not the case. We have many, and we will have many more announced over the coming weeks.
    I have seen many people, other students in particular it seems, get annoyed with UKIP for their energy policies, such as wanting to abolish green taxes and subsidies. I actually think these policies are very sensible, as green taxes are damaging for business (when combined with the heavy regulation enforced by the EU and the government, it is no wonder our economy seems to be struggling) and forcing the country into inefficient means of energy production like the rather useless wind turbines is driving up everyone's energy bills and adding to poverty in this country. Coming from a poor background myself, I can fully appreciate what energy poverty is like and why this country needs to do more to address it. As far as I am aware, LibLabCon don't have any plans to address it, and the Greens will make it worse, much worse. So that just leaves UKIP. Now for the killer point. As a country, the UK only produces about 3% of global carbon emissions, so why should we cripple our economy and force our poorest people into energy poverty when we have China and India building four coal-fired power stations every week, and even if we woke up to a carbon-neutral Britain tomorrow, it would make very little difference. For stating these arguments, I have repeatedly been called a "climate-change denier". Well, no I don't deny climate change. I am however unsure that it is caused by human activity, as the planet has always gone through natural temperature changes, and even if it is caused by human activity, it seems like there is very little that the UK can do about it for the time being.

    Carbon tax actually has fairly minimal effect on businesses, in general, most of the problems which businesses complain about are due to poor execution of ethics on their behalf rather than actual losses in profit, it's not even funny how much this is the case with the energy industry. That's not even mentioning how renewable sources are starting to be on par with the price of consumable sources though. Given the current state of the Saudi's manipulating the oil market, it's also a good idea that we minimise our involvement with it and thus move towards renewable sources of energy.

    I am a fan of UKIP's tax policy as well. No tax on the minimum wage seems like a much better solution than the Green Party's insane £10 minimum wage (bye bye small businesses) and I think that inheritance tax is nothing short of a scandal, so I fully support getting rid of that. Also with regards to the minimum wage, with a somewhat deregulated economy the like of which we would be likely to see under a UKIP government, the cost of living in general would be likely to reduce quite significantly, so increasing the minimum wage is really not necessary, there are better, less damaging ways to deal with the problem.

    Agreed, no tax on minimum wage is good, but we could probably increase it a little, not £10 but £7.50 would work. I don't really see how an increase in minimum wage will hurt small businesses, the ones I've worked for generally pay above industry standard and I'd say most aren't in the kind of industries where they would be hiring a significant number of low wage workers. Cost of living will reduce a little, but not significantly

    Scrapping HS2 seems sensible, as the whole thing is very expensive and I just don't think the benefits will outweigh the £80 billion cost.

    HS2 is one of those projects where it's very complicated to figure out the economic effects, and I'd argue it's about being more connected to Europe rather than giving a domestic economic boost

    Cutting the foreign aid budget is also sensible in my view, we currently give way too much away; 0.7% of GDP is excessive to say the least. Only £2 billion of the foreign aid budget is given to humanitarian relief. We are currently giving money to dodgy regimes, and countries like India (with a space program) and Argentina, who would still love to get their hands on the Falklands.

    Probably not the best example as the foreign aid to those countries are essentially bribes to not start wars, which would cost us a bit more. We should however at least try to keep the aid given to those countries limited to good uses

    So that's why I support UKIP, cut down to a few of their policies which I consider most important.
    I very nearly support UKIP ( I would but being anti-EU and the perceived racism are dealbreakers for me) but your points do have some faults, which I've outlined in bold.
 
 
 
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