Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am an international student and therefore I don't have the best idea of British universities but my situation is this

    I received an interview at Oxford this round, however I did not receive an offer but I have some reason to believe I was close, but I've heard that many people try again next round and succeed. So I would like to know:

    -Would it be worth re sitting my international A levels to get better grades?
    -Would it be better for me to apply again for Oxford or to Cambridge this time around?
    -Do they discriminate against second-timers?
    -What personal experience do you guys have of going for a second try?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Try to get interview feedback if you can so you know where you went awry.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    - Resitting your A levels probably won't help. It's enough to have AAA (or whatever your subject's offer is).
    - Reapply to whichever you prefer, although if your A level scores aren't high, doing well on an Oxford admissions test might be your best bet of getting in.
    - Reapplicants aren't discriminated against but it's advisable to apply to a different college than you applied to first time round.
    - I got in second time round. The fact I was (re)applying post-A level wasn't brought up in my interviews.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BJack)
    - Resitting your A levels probably won't help. It's enough to have AAA (or whatever your subject's offer is).
    - Reapply to whichever you prefer, although if your A level scores aren't high, doing well on an Oxford admissions test might be your best bet of getting in.
    - Reapplicants aren't discriminated against but it's advisable to apply to a different college than you applied to first time round.
    - I got in second time round. The fact I was (re)applying post-A level wasn't brought up in my interviews.
    Hi. May I ask what you did to kind of 'make sure' that you get an offer the second time round?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    That's interesting because I have heard of a few people who made it the second time around. I am applying for law so my admissions test is the LNAT, but I do have doubts about resitting my A-levels. What did you do in that year if you didn't re-sit?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BJack)
    - Resitting your A levels probably won't help. It's enough to have AAA (or whatever your subject's offer is).
    - Reapply to whichever you prefer, although if your A level scores aren't high, doing well on an Oxford admissions test might be your best bet of getting in.
    - Reapplicants aren't discriminated against but it's advisable to apply to a different college than you applied to first time round.
    - I got in second time round. The fact I was (re)applying post-A level wasn't brought up in my interviews.
    Hi. I was wondering: does it feel different to be a year older than others? Has it affected university life?

    Not reapplying but interested!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by uranocene)
    Hi. I was wondering: does it feel different to be a year older than others? Has it affected university life?

    Not reapplying but interested!
    You realize many students who start are 19 regardless? Especially from China, as well as from Russia and from my country, Montenegro.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kolasinac138)
    Hi. May I ask what you did to kind of 'make sure' that you get an offer the second time round?
    I applied for a different subject, which I was better at — that probably helped a lot. The only other major difference was having more confidence, so that I didn't fall to pieces at every stage of the admissions process.

    (Original post by uranocene)
    Hi. I was wondering: does it feel different to be a year older than others? Has it affected university life?
    As Kolasinac138 has pointed out, there are a lot of students who are older than 18 when they start. One year isn't a noticeable difference at all; even five years needn't make a big difference. It is slightly sobering looking back to think that, owing to course lengths and when people's birthdays fall, some of my friends at university were still 20 when they finished, whereas I was 23. That feels like a much bigger gap!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BJack)
    I applied for a different subject, which I was better at — that probably helped a lot. The only other major difference was having more confidence, so that I didn't fall to pieces at every stage of the admissions process.



    As Kolasinac138 has pointed out, there are a lot of students who are older than 18 when they start. One year isn't a noticeable difference at all; even five years needn't make a big difference. It is slightly sobering looking back to think that, owing to course lengths and when people's birthdays fall, some of my friends at university were still 20 when they finished, whereas I was 23. That feels like a much bigger gap!
    What did you apply for first time and second time?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kolasinac138)
    What did you apply for first time and second time?
    Maths first time, chemistry second time. It turns out that GCSE and A level scores are a very bad indicator of how good you are at a subject.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BJack)
    Maths first time, chemistry second time. It turns out that GCSE and A level scores are a very bad indicator of how good you are at a subject.
    Nice, I'm thinking of (potentially) reapplying but I really want to make certain that I don't get rejected again if I do. Did you have any other offers on the table that you threw away?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kolasinac138)
    Nice, I'm thinking of (potentially) reapplying but I really want to make certain that I don't get rejected again if I do. Did you have any other offers on the table that you threw away?
    Yes, I had a place at Warwick, which I turned down after I'd met the offer. It's not a decision to be made lightly, and I'd probably have regretted it had I not gotten in to Oxford second time round.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BJack)
    Yes, I had a place at Warwick, which I turned down after I'd met the offer. It's not a decision to be made lightly, and I'd probably have regretted it had I not gotten in to Oxford second time round.

    What did you do in your 'gap' year, and did they like it? I presume it was chem-related?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kolasinac138)
    What did you do in your 'gap' year, and did they like it? I presume it was chem-related?
    I worked in a lab doing not very exciting things. I don't think it helped my application very much but it was good to keep busy.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BJack)
    I worked in a lab doing not very exciting things. I don't think it helped my application very much but it was good to keep busy.
    Interesting. Thanks for the info. I'll have to consider whether to reapply and if it would be worth it. I will probably wait for my feedback from the college to see what went wrong first.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Could you accept an offer from another uni, but still apply for Oxford in October?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jace128)
    Could you accept an offer from another uni, but still apply for Oxford in October?
    Nope.

    Also, resitting your A-levels might give you an advantage for Cambridge, where having high percentages gives you a clear advantage. However, I'd advise against this unless you have extenuating circumstances.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by smile:D)
    Nope.

    Also, resitting your A-levels might give you an advantage for Cambridge, where having high percentages gives you a clear advantage. However, I'd advise against this unless you have extenuating circumstances.
    Why? What if it was a university outside the UK?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jace128)
    Why? What if it was a university outside the UK?
    My daughter had an offer for Oxford last year but missed her grades. The Irish system does not allow for priority remarking and the results of the contested exams were not available until October. Her college told her that if the remarks meant that she achieved her required grades then they would hold a place for her for 2015 entry - but only if she didn't start another university course either in the UK or overseas.

    My daughter decided to accept an Irish university instead of waiting for the remarks because she didn't want to do a gap year.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jace128)
    Why? What if it was a university outside the UK?
    Because they expect you to get high grades the first time round without resitting. It's fine resitting one or two units, but otherwise they would probably frown upon it, unless, as I've said, you have extenuating circumstances.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.