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    Currently at a2 I am taking economics, maths, spanish and physics, next year I am probably going to drop physics or economics but that all depends on what I will do at uni.
    I have no idea which course would be best for me. physics is looking less appealing but that may just be because we are starting coursework, I find economics fairly easy with little effort.
    I can't picture myself in a job that requires doing practical experiments as they often go wrong.
    I was also thinking of majoring in economics and minoring in spanish.

    If any of you have any help or advice, please comment!
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    You should take the subject that you enjoy the most. If you absolutely cannot choose, why not take them both?
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    If you hate lab work - avoid Physics. Economics is a largely exam based course.
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    (Original post by Classical Liberal)
    If you hate lab work - avoid Physics. Economics is a largely exam based course.
    Ignore this person.

    Lots of physicists don't do lab work. One of the fist things my first year mentor said to us was he was terrible at and hated labs as an undergrad.

    Mathematical and theoretical physicists don't need to do lab work. There will be plenty of scope and options to go down these routes. Sure you will have to take labs in first year and most likely second. But you will be bale to take a more theory ad/or computing based dissertation in final year. Basically you will be bale to get a first whilst being **** at labs.

    Some of the most important physicists were/are theoretical/mathematical physicists.

    Also physics has economics applications. That and economics is very pseudo sciency, not that will stop you getting a high paying job or anything :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by hyjacked)
    Currently at a2 I am taking economics, maths, spanish and physics, next year I am probably going to drop physics or economics but that all depends on what I will do at uni.
    I have no idea which course would be best for me. physics is looking less appealing but that may just be because we are starting coursework, I find economics fairly easy with little effort.
    I can't picture myself in a job that requires doing practical experiments as they often go wrong.
    I was also thinking of majoring in economics and minoring in spanish.

    If any of you have any help or advice, please comment!
    do maths - its the best
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    Thanks guys,
    I looked yesterday and there is a course at UCL which is statistcs, economics and a language.
    I think that will leave a lot of doors open however I am not sure if it would be too much work

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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Ignore this person.

    Lots of physicists don't do lab work. One of the fist things my first year mentor said to us was he was terrible at and hated labs as an undergrad.

    Mathematical and theoretical physicists don't need to do lab work. There will be plenty of scope and options to go down these routes. Sure you will have to take labs in first year and most likely second. But you will be bale to take a more theory ad/or computing based dissertation in final year. Basically you will be bale to get a first whilst being **** at labs.

    Some of the most important physicists were/are theoretical/mathematical physicists.

    Also physics has economics applications. That and economics is very pseudo sciency, not that will stop you getting a high paying job or anything :rolleyes:
    So you're first year mentor did enough labs to find out how much he hated them... cheers for proving my point.

    The reality of an undergraduate Physics degree is that you have to do assessed lab work (and it does count towards your final degree) - you really haven't studied Physics if you don't do lab work - that's what makes Physics a science, not the fancy equations. Obviously once you've done your degree, you can start to specialise in things you like but that is 3 years down the line and most people don't go onto to do academic Physics anyway.

    If you like the technical side of Physics but you hate the lab side, and you are also able to write cogently (something Physics students are often incompetent at) and you like exam assessments Economics is a good fit. If you are poor at writing and also hate lab work, Mathematics is probably a better fit. Also, how interested you are in science versus current affairs should influence your decision to go with either Economics or Physics.

    Also, Economics students do a lot less work throughout the year compared to Physics students (mainly due to the fact Economics students don't do any compulsory lab work - we can pick and choose what lectures to attend rather than wasting our afternoons trying to get pointless experiments to work).
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    (Original post by Classical Liberal)
    So you're first year mentor did enough labs to find out how much he hated them... cheers for proving my point.

    The reality of an undergraduate Physics degree is that you have to do assessed lab work (and it does count towards your final degree) - you really haven't studied Physics if you don't do lab work - that's what makes Physics a science, not the fancy equations. Obviously once you've done your degree, you can start to specialise in things you like but that is 3 years down the line and most people don't go onto to do academic Physics anyway.

    If you like the technical side of Physics but you hate the lab side, and you are also able to write cogently (something Physics students are often incompetent at) and you like exam assessments Economics is a good fit. If you are poor at writing and also hate lab work, Mathematics is probably a better fit. Also, how interested you are in science versus current affairs should influence your decision to go with either Economics or Physics.
    I had better tell my old Head of Physics he isn't a real physicist! :facepalm:

    That post is full of even more rubbish. Lol at the equations aren't important.

    You can get a first in physics if you are good at theory and maths but **** in labs. With me it was possible to just do theory/computing stuff from year 2 semester 2 onwards. Year 3 you choose what sort of project you do (there will be plenty of projects on offer that do not require lab work. Physics has loads of stuff that doesn't involve lab work. Well not directly anyway, people collaborate, a theorist will come up with a theory that experimentalists test or experimentalists produce results theorists analyse etc.

    TLDR - If someone is good at maths and physics theory but hate labs they can still do and shouldn't be discouraged from doing a physics degree.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    I
    That post is full of even more rubbish. Lol at the equations aren't important.
    You might want to work on your verbal reasoning skills.
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    Economics is freaking AWFUL! I would suggest you pick the subject you will enjoy studying and know you will excel at.
 
 
 
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