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    hi all,

    so why does glucose need to be phosphorlyated in glycolysis?
    in my textbook it says so that glucose gets activated, but what does this actually mean?

    This may be a trivial question but I would like to fully understand it for my exams
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    Back to AS knowledge, activation energy is the minimum energy that is required for a reaction to take place.
    Enzymes are known to reduce the minimum energy required, so the reaction can take place at a much lower energy.
    So phosphorylation lowers the activation energy level and makes the glucose more reactive

    According to the textbook it's used for "enzyme-controlled reactions that follows" after that which is the Co-enzymes NAD and which become reduced.

    So I suppose it allows the oxidation of triose phosphate to be much more efficient and hydrolysed quicker into pyruvate?

    That's what I think, not sure if I answered your question, please correct me if I am wrong?
 
 
 
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