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    Hey,

    I'm graduating this year with a degree in physics, and I've been looking at postgrad degrees focussed on programming (particularly those aimed towards careers in the video game/entertainment industry).

    I learned basic matlab and fortran as an undergrad, and I'm currently teaching myself C++ as most courses require good C++ knowledge for entry.

    I emailed the university I'm interested in attending and asked for guidance on how much C++ knowledge I should have prior to applying for the course. The response I received essentially said that they occasionally take people with less programming knowledge as long as 'they demonstrate enthusiasm'. I have a lot of extracurriculars so I think I'll make a decent applicant, but he also added that 'a portfolio of interesting work' would help my case. :eek:

    Hmmm. I'm not sure exactly what I should be submitting. I've been thinking about creating a simple game using C++ (like.. space invaders, or something). I also have an app I made using MIT app inventor, but it's not exactly 'real programming' (it uses building blocks). I guess I could send him a couple of the fortran programs I wrote as an undergrad, but they are.. far from interesting (calculating phonon bands and density of states... hah).

    Advice would be greeeat. Are these ideas too boring? Do I need to go back to the drawing board? I have three research projects (two to be published) but they're all obviously physics-related and so I doubt they're relevant enough to be mentioned.
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    (Original post by k3ro)
    Hey,

    I'm graduating this year with a degree in physics, and I've been looking at postgrad degrees focussed on programming (particularly those aimed towards careers in the video game/entertainment industry).

    I learned basic matlab and fortran as an undergrad, and I'm currently teaching myself C++ as most courses require good C++ knowledge for entry.

    I emailed the university I'm interested in attending and asked for guidance on how much C++ knowledge I should have prior to applying for the course. The response I received essentially said that they occasionally take people with less programming knowledge as long as 'they demonstrate enthusiasm'. I have a lot of extracurriculars so I think I'll make a decent applicant, but he also added that 'a portfolio of interesting work' would help my case. :eek:

    Hmmm. I'm not sure exactly what I should be submitting. I've been thinking about creating a simple game using C++ (like.. space invaders, or something). I also have an app I made using MIT app inventor, but it's not exactly 'real programming' (it uses building blocks). I guess I could send him a couple of the fortran programs I wrote as an undergrad, but they are.. far from interesting (calculating phonon bands and density of states... hah).

    Advice would be greeeat. Are these ideas too boring? Do I need to go back to the drawing board? I have three research projects (two to be published) but they're all obviously physics-related and so I doubt they're relevant enough to be mentioned.
    Theres no such thing as too boring in this case. As long as you can prove that you are enthusiastic enough to do your own projects in your own time, thats what they are looking for.

    Github is a great place to upload and store these projects
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    I will be starting an Undergraduate degree in september in Computer Games Programming, but, I have no UCAS point but I got an unconditional offer as I have worked as a professional Games and 3D Applications programmer for 2 years (I will be 19 in may). During my interview I showed them the most visually pleasing projects I had. I found that even other programmers find it boring looking at code itself, they want to see what you can make that will keep them interested for long enough.

    My advice would be to pick up a C language (like C++ or C#[I mainly use C#]) and pick up a games engine (Unreal Engine 4 or Unity3D[I use Unity mainly]) and make something "pretty" that works (Stick with 2D unless you have some nice 3D modeling and texturing skills).

    The course leader I had my meeting with said that he gets to many people showing him really complex stuff that only half works and because my work was simple (not flappy bird level simple but working movement controls, networked multiplayer with chat, working GUI ect), it made the meeting short and when I left he had only seen good points with my work and the nice visuals kept his attention.

    So to get to the point, Simple and Working is good and Complex and half working/buggy isn't even worth your time and then just throw in some simple but nice to look at visuals

    P.s He was really impressed with the networking side of the games I had done and as a tip, networking in unity3d is really easy, you might want to look in a Package called TNet for unity as well, it makes networking even simpler.

    Sorry for rambling a bit but I hope that helps.
 
 
 
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