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    I've heard that law firms are not too keen on A Level Law and look more favourably on things like A Level Philosophy etc.

    How much truth is there in this? I'm planning on taking 3 A Level's through private/independent entry and I'm just wondering which A Levels will provide me with the best chances?

    Any help is appreciated, thanks.
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    Something like History, Maths and Economics would be a good way to go
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    (Original post by Buxtonwater)
    Something like History, Maths and Economics would be a good way to go
    Thanks. +rep
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    I agree with the other poster.

    But, even though A levels are looked at, it's more of the grade they're looking at. They'd only probably look at the subjects if they were stuck between two people. My best friend didn't take exactly stereotypically traditional lawyer subjects at A level (he did A level law), but still managed to sign a contract with a magic circle firm. And apart from that, it's performance at university which comes first and foremost, not A levels.

    I'm probably going to be offered a contract with a good commercial firm in the summer. They aren't magic circle (I'd rather not work in a magic circle firm anyway) but have a good reputation, get interesting cases, money is good, and has actual interesting and fun lawyers. They don't even ask about A levels because their philosophy is at age 17/18 you shouldn't have been sat in your bedroom working hard so you could become a lawyer in another five years time, you should have been out respecting and enjoying your youth. I could not work in a firm where the lawyers lives revolve around their career and law. Would be soul sucking. I guess it all depends on the firm.
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    (Original post by Ahava)
    I agree with the other poster.

    But, even though A levels are looked at, it's more of the grade they're looking at. They'd only probably look at the subjects if they were stuck between two people. My best friend didn't take exactly stereotypically traditional lawyer subjects at A level (he did A level law), but still managed to sign a contract with a magic circle firm. And apart from that, it's performance at university which comes first and foremost, not A levels.

    I'm probably going to be offered a contract with a good commercial firm in the summer. They aren't magic circle (I'd rather not work in a magic circle firm anyway) but have a good reputation, get interesting cases, money is good, and has actual interesting and fun lawyers. They don't even ask about A levels because their philosophy is at age 17/18 you shouldn't have been sat in your bedroom working hard so you could become a lawyer in another five years time, you should have been out respecting and enjoying your youth. I could not work in a firm where the lawyers lives revolve around their career and law. Would be soul sucking. I guess it all depends on the firm.
    I hope you don't mind me asking, what firm is it?
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    (Original post by Ahava)
    I agree with the other poster.

    But, even though A levels are looked at, it's more of the grade they're looking at. They'd only probably look at the subjects if they were stuck between two people. My best friend didn't take exactly stereotypically traditional lawyer subjects at A level (he did A level law), but still managed to sign a contract with a magic circle firm. And apart from that, it's performance at university which comes first and foremost, not A levels.

    I'm probably going to be offered a contract with a good commercial firm in the summer. They aren't magic circle (I'd rather not work in a magic circle firm anyway) but have a good reputation, get interesting cases, money is good, and has actual interesting and fun lawyers. They don't even ask about A levels because their philosophy is at age 17/18 you shouldn't have been sat in your bedroom working hard so you could become a lawyer in another five years time, you should have been out respecting and enjoying your youth. I could not work in a firm where the lawyers lives revolve around their career and law. Would be soul sucking. I guess it all depends on the firm.
    This firm you speak of sounds like a dream...


    Too bawse for you, sir.
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    (Original post by Buxtonwater)
    I hope you don't mind me asking, what firm is it?
    The firm my friend signed for or the firm I possibly will be signing for?
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    (Original post by chidchilli)
    This firm you speak of sounds like a dream...


    Too bawse for you, sir.
    It is. Just hoping the dream does not shatter. I have an interview next week eek!
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    (Original post by Messiah Complex)
    I've heard that law firms are not too keen on A Level Law and look more favourably on things like A Level Philosophy etc.

    How much truth is there in this? I'm planning on taking 3 A Level's through private/independent entry and I'm just wondering which A Levels will provide me with the best chances?

    Any help is appreciated, thanks.
    Obviously more traditional subjects will look better but they don't particularly care once your reach the minimum A-level requirement around ABB/AAB.
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    (Original post by Ahava)
    It is. Just hoping the dream does not shatter. I have an interview next week eek!
    Which firm is this if you don't mind me asking?
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    (Original post by Ahava)
    The firm my friend signed for or the firm I possibly will be signing for?
    The firm you're hoping to get a contract with
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    (Original post by SmaugTheTerrible)
    Which firm is this if you don't mind me asking?

    (Original post by Buxtonwater)
    The firm you're hoping to get a contract with
    Weightmans. Mostly commercial based but they do have a personal law side which is possible to do seats in too (so I'm told). I'm conflicted whether I want to go into commercial or specialise in family so this attracted me. The people I met in the firm all have very individual personalities and their lives don't revolve around law, they have outside interests too. Most people I have met from magic circle firms are very egotistical, narcissistic and are very reminiscent of Patrick Bateman from American Psycho. There's always outside activities and social events for people in the firm. Overall, every single person I have met from the firm have been very welcoming, warm and non judgmental.

    The only firm I have found similar so far based on fun factor is Irwin Mitchells. Although, they do take A levels into account. They are very grade focused and its notoriously hard to get a contract with them due to popularity and high requirements. They too do many social events and have sport teams. However, the people I have met from the firm has been a very strange mix. Some I met couldn't be more friendly and helpful. Others, made me feel extremely uncomfortable, literally looked me up and down, sighed when I wanted to speak to them and even downright told me they think I wouldn't like working for their firm. Because of that I'm not exactly sure if I want to apply to them.

    You're going to meet a lot of pricks along the way and their immature, snobby behaviour shouldn't stop you from applying to a firm that you want. But when you meet a firm where every single person is friendly and welcoming, it's quite eye opening.
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    Take the subjects you enjoy which will get you into a good university. Unless they're mickey mouse subjects law firms are going to care a lot more about your university performance as long as you get high grades in your A levels.
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    (Original post by RobertWhite)
    Take the subjects you enjoy which will get you into a good university. Unless they're mickey mouse subjects law firms are going to care a lot more about your university performance as long as you get high grades in your A levels.
    I already have a degree. I plan on doing the GDL but I want A Levels as well to open up more options for me in regard to firms I can apply for that filter based on A levels. I did a BTEC prior to my undergraduate degree.
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    (Original post by Messiah Complex)
    I already have a degree. I plan on doing the GDL but I want A Levels as well to open up more options for me in regard to firms I can apply for that filter based on A levels. I did a BTEC prior to my undergraduate degree.
    You should probably talk to some of the firms you're considering applying to for advice. Many may not consider you after taking A levels later, precisely because you took them later. I would have thought it a waste of time but who knows.
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    (Original post by RobertWhite)
    You should probably talk to some of the firms you're considering applying to for advice. Many may not consider you after taking A levels later, precisely because you took them later. I would have thought it a waste of time but who knows.
    Alright, I'll ask some once I'm on the GDL and things are going ahead as I won't be taking them before the GDL anyway. My next focus is saving up to get onto the GDL course.
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    It is always said that they are not keen on Law. This is not true - it is just not essential. It doesn't really mean anything you will still have to go through training as pass your exams but it just means if you have done an A-Level in it you will already have some background knowledge. Although presumably if you want to get in to Law you will do your own research and studying anyway.

    English, Economics and Maths are other good subjects to do when going in to Law.
 
 
 
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