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    what's the difference? example: university of california vs california state university
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    Simply two different institutions, like you might have Manchester and Manchester Met in Manchester.
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    The University of Idaho sucks. Idaho State University rules....


    Short answer: One's privately funded, one's not; the 'state' universities are partly subsidized by the states. As a general rule, they are cheaper to get into.

    Longer answer:
    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN STATE AND PRIVATE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES? State colleges and universities, also called public universities, are founded and subsidized by U.S. state governments to provide low-cost education to residents of that state. These universities tend to be very large and generally admit a wider range of students than private universities. State university tuition costs are generally lower than those of private universities. International students, as well as those from other states, are considered out-of-state residents and therefore pay a higher tuition than residents of the state in which the institution is located.

    Private colleges & universities are funded by a combination of endowments, gifts from their alumni, research grants, and tuition fees. Tuition fees tend to be higher than state universities, but there is no distinction made between state and non-state residents. Private universities are usually smaller and can have religious affiliation or can be single-sex schools.
    https://www.educationusa.info/faq.ph...139&language=1
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    (Original post by reyjusuf)
    what's the difference? example: university of california vs california state university
    California is a bit of a unique case because it has a tiered college system.

    • UCs -- 4 year universities, extremely selective, research-intensive, grant undergraduate and graduate degrees (including PhDs and medical/law/etc. degrees)
    • CSUs -- 4 year universities, noticeably less selective, much less research-intensive, grant mostly undergraduate degrees and some master's degrees
    • Community colleges -- 2 year colleges, not at all selective, no/little research, students transfer to UCs and CSUs after two years


    For other states, the University of [State Name] is usually the "flagship" public university -- the best, the most selective, and generally the academically strongest public university in the state.

    The [State Name] State University is usually the "land grant" university of the state -- the one with academic programs relating to agriculture, engineering, wildlife sciences, etc. (They typically also offer the usual liberal arts programs, of course.)

    Examples of this division are the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) and Michigan State, UNC Chapel Hill and NC State, and the University of Washington and Washington State.



    Some "University of X" universities are actually private universities -- examples are the University of Denver, University of Miami, University of Chicago, and the University of Pennsylvania.
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    Thanks ^^
 
 
 
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