Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi

    Is it difficult to balance studying and working part time? Where do you work and how many hours? Does the extra money benefit you greatly?

    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by courtneyhalex)
    Hi

    Is it difficult to balance studying and working part time? Where do you work and how many hours? Does the extra money benefit you greatly?

    I've graduated now, but in my first and second year, I worked alongside my study. I was lucky enough to get a job with my uni, so they were more flexible and understanding than some employers might be- e.g. when I had exams, I was able to take time off for these without a problem.

    I didn't need the extra money as such, but I didn't want to not work at all for three years, and it helped fund things like buying a car and paying for insurance and the odd holiday.

    You probably won't be able to earn loads of money, I earned just under £100 a week, but when you are on a tight budget, this will make a huge difference. I usually worked around 12 hours a week, but would put in more hours during busy periods and less during exams.

    If you're worried about balancing work and study, perhaps consider working full time during the summer holidays, or Christmas temporary work, rather than working during term time.
    •  Official Rep
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
     Official Rep
    (Original post by courtneyhalex)
    Hi

    Is it difficult to balance studying and working part time? Where do you work and how many hours? Does the extra money benefit you greatly?


    Hello!

    No it isn't difficult balancing studies and work so long as you are organised and have the right job that won't take up too much time.

    Looking at jobs within the university is a great idea as there are lots of opportunities and they understand that your studies come first. Of course it is still a commitment and if you take a job at the university you must be able to do it effectively as well as keep up with study demands. If you aren't able to have a continued commitment to a job there are opportunities for ad hoc work, so open days for example.

    I'm a student ambassador at the University of Reading and would definitely recommend applying to be one wherever you end up studying. I get to do a variety of jobs from campus tours, office work, school workshops to UCAS events. Its very flexible and you only take on the work you are able to whilst doing the minimum that is required of being an ambassador (i.e. open days).

    Another job which I would recommend and that other universities have is a caller fund. Within this you contact the alumni of the university and appeal to them for funds which go towards bursaries, scholarships, student activities and other areas of university. You can have some great conversations with people from a variety of professional backgrounds and even make some connections or gain advice for the future.

    The extra money has definitely helped contributing to living whether it contribute to rent, food or just nice things to buy for yourself! Its also very useful for future employers as you'll be able to show them that you have done more than just studying and enjoying university as well as gain some invaluable experience and skills.

    Hope that helps, feel free to ask any more questions,
    Pip, third year English Literature and History of Art
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I think it depends, on 1. the course you're doing 2. the hours required 3. whether you have placements 4. the type of job you're able to get and 5, how organised you are : -)

    So if you're doing a course thats 20 - 30 hours a week contact time and has placements, getting a job is bound to be more difficult. And if you're not very organised then the splitting your time between uni/work/home will also be difficult.

    But if you're doing a course with less contact time, you organise your time and your job is flexible. then getting a job is more manageable.

    But I think many students have to work to get through uni because SF, in some cases won't even pay the rent.

    Speak to your uni and see what jobs they have available. look at retail work, the pay can be low, but in my experience they can be more flexible with hours and there is the opportunity for overtime during summer/xmas/easter etc. Hope this helps.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    I worked 25-30 hours per week throughout my degree (more during holidays) and still got a 2.1.

    You don't want to finish uni with nothing on your CV either. Even if it's just working a Saturday job stacking shelves during term time, it's going to look a lot better than if you have done nothing.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    I never worked at uni and don't think I could have. It depends on your course. I wouldn't do it unless I genuinely needed it to live, either: I'm at uni to invest in my future, so it makes no sense to me to spend a bunch of time each week earning minimum wage at the same time. On the other hand, if your time commitment at uni is low enough, why not, I guess.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I had a job from second year onwards, through now into my masters. I worked two shifts a week in term time, and full-time in the holidays.

    I got a first in my undergraduate degree, whilst also doing lots of extra-curriculars, so it doesn't have to negatively effect you - conversely, it can actually motivate you to work harder. You know what they say; if you want something done, then delegate it to a busy person! This does depend on your course, though - I had a medium-low amount of contact hours, but a lot of assignments.

    You just have to be organised, and cut down on procrastination time. Start assignments early, and be prepared to ask for time off of work if it's needed.

    The extra money is really useful, and now that i'm doing a masters with no government maintenance loan, it's essential. It also has meant that i've been able to fit in some travelling around my degree, which is a big plus.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I worked while I studied since 15. I got top grades As and A*s. What I did was I go to school go home change, (didnt eat cos I would eat at work) go to work, working from 6-12. I would do dishes and hard small tasks that the other kitchen staffs would not do at a restaurant and as I have been doing dishes since around 12, I could do dishes with my eyes closed.

    I balanced work and studies by taking a small note with topics I need to revise and pre-study for. I would just stand in front of the sink and think, think, think and think some more about the topics on my note.

    However please note that this peiord is for information from within not outside. In other words you can use this time to think about topics such as how should I write this essay?, I know, I will write this in introduction and conclude with this. Whereas you cannot use this time to figure out an answer to a mathematical equation.

    This would mean that you will not be able to talk much as you will be preoccupied with your thinking. Hence it is not for everybody. I am not that talkative and I like working in silence and alone so it worked rather perfectly for me.

    One good thing about this for me was that it enabled me to think better, as if I would sit in front of my desk for a long time especially after a day at school or university, it would often become quite frustrating.

    In the respect of benefits of extra cash to spend while studying, there are none, in my opinion. You will think about spending the extra money that will potentially disturb your studies in great ways, although you do not have to have money for that happen, but the chnaces of that happening and in a greater scale, is larger. If you have not a lot of money to spend this will automatically tirgger you to become more saving, and it will benefit you greatly in the future if you how to save from an early age. So do that innit

    Hope this helps and remember that if you are going to be working while studying, you will probably apply for a body exhausting, do not want to spend another minute here and go home, sit in the toilet even though you need to and I hate this job, job. These types of jobs, I think that the manager or the boss who can determine how many hours you are to work will adjust the number of hours frequntly. Thus if work gets busy or is about to get busier they will asked you to come in and do extra hours, do not agree to extra shifts when having studies to do. Just worked long and short enough so you do not have to open your hands to your parent for allowance. This is because at the end the time you INVEST in your teens and 20s will determine your whole future.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.