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    Hi

    I've lately been thinking about pursuing a career In teaching English. I want to work in east Asia in the near future but wish to learn & gain a certificate, which will help me to achieve this.

    I don't have any good GCSE's results from highschool & my highest qualification is a Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma In Interactive Media from college.

    I was thinking about retaking my English and possibly maths GCSE's again or something similar then move onto TEFL or CELTA.

    Any advice would be appreciated

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    (Original post by h3ybro)
    I was thinking about retaking my English and possibly maths GCSE's again or something similar then move onto TEFL or CELTA.
    This is probably the quickest and most desirable route. However, you need to remember that without a degree that even with TEFL/CELTA you won't be able to teach in some countries as some countries require a degree.
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    Thanks, I see why a degree would be desirable to employers. Do you mind me asking if you think a TEFL would be worthwhile?

    I just want to improve my chances of employment if I were planing to move aboard. If there are any other alternatives.

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    I taught English in Japan, which was a great experience. But you need a degree to qualify for a work visa. I think this is the case in other Asian countries.
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    If you're looking for a career, then you're 99% in for disappointment. Most English teachers across the globe get exploited, underpaid and are excluded from many rights. If you want to do it for a year or a few years, then by all means go for it. I had an amazing time doing just this. But quite frankly, unless you have the business savvy traits to start a successful academy, you'll be working for Pennies.

    Be sure to do as much research as possible into any potential jobs and join expat community groups for advice, as you will certainly benefit from it.

    As for which to do (CELTA or TEFL), it's like asking whether to buy Pepsi or Coca Cola. Each have prestige (at a certain amount of hours), and it depends on where you apply.

    If you do decide to go for it, I wish you luck and hope you have an amazing time like I did.
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    (Original post by monkeyman1990)
    If you're looking for a career, then you're 99% in for disappointment. Most English teachers across the globe get exploited, underpaid and are excluded from many rights. If you want to do it for a year or a few years, then by all means go for it. I had an amazing time doing just this. But quite frankly, unless you have the business savvy traits to start a successful academy, you'll be working for Pennies.

    Be sure to do as much research as possible into any potential jobs and join expat community groups for advice, as you will certainly benefit from it.

    As for which to do (CELTA or TEFL), it's like asking whether to buy Pepsi or Coca Cola. Each have prestige (at a certain amount of hours), and it depends on where you apply.

    If you do decide to go for it, I wish you luck and hope you have an amazing time like I did.
    I can agree with this to some extent. Most people who go to teach English abroad aren't doing it as a long-term career. Most people do it for a couple of years as an experience and then return to their home country. I do know a few people who have met foreign partners and gone on to settle down in the country, but this is rare. The pay usually is poor, although it does depend on what country you're in. You do have to be careful about exploitation and know your rights as an employee. Choose a reputable programme to be hired into and look out for things that sound too good to be true- they probably are.
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    Thanks for you're replies. I was just curious about going this route due to the apparent demand in the east. Maybe I should consider a other skill/trade to learn. Just don't want to be working Min wage jobs all my life & try make something for myself while I'm still young

    Though I imagine it must of been good working in Japan for you. Was planing on visiting there or Seoul but the prices of the fights to go there are so expensive

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    If you fancy Hong Kong..

    Hong Kong has a 'Working Holiday Scheme' http://www/immid.gov.hk/en/services/...nce-notes.html. It allows under 30s to work for 12 months in Hong Kong, and you don't have to be a graduate. The scheme gives you more working flexibility, because you don't need an employer to sponsor you.

    In relation to different qualifications, the CELTA, I'm sure, is a level 5 qualification, so the course may have specific requirements. TEFL qualification comes in all levels from level 2. What you need to look out for is courses that offer teaching experience with real students. Although these courses are very expensive, it pays off in the end because you get better teaching jobs with more reputable schools paying better wages and staff treatment.
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    Sorry that link should read:

    http//www.immd.gov.hk/en/services/hk-visas/working-holiday/guidance-notes.html
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    (Original post by h3ybro)
    Thanks for you're replies. I was just curious about going this route due to the apparent demand in the east. Maybe I should consider a other skill/trade to learn. Just don't want to be working Min wage jobs all my life & try make something for myself while I'm still young

    Though I imagine it must of been good working in Japan for you. Was planing on visiting there or Seoul but the prices of the fights to go there are so expensive

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    If you're thinking of teaching in Seoul/ South Korea, check out the EPIK programme. I know people who have done it and its a really good deal. The best one in Japan is the government-run JET programme. They even pay your flights, although its very competitive to get on. You would need a degree for both of these programmes but the pay is pretty good compared to other Asian countries.
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    (Original post by monkeyman1990)
    But quite frankly, unless you have the business savvy traits to start a successful academy, you'll be working for Pennies.
    Is £26 per hour for an unqualified teacher 'pennies'?
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    You're not exactly looking for a career here, but you do can get good money. If you want a career, you'll need to climb up the ladder, step up your game, and go into marketing and even management in the school you tutor at.

    There are three main types of teaching English abroad: Programmes or projects (eg Oxbridge Summer School, JET, etc), teaching in state schools, and teaching in private schools or tutorial centres.

    With the first type you'll need to look into the requirements for individual programmes.

    The second type, you will very often need a relevant degree plus a proper teaching qualification (CELTA is not one, you'll need a BEd, a PGCE, or PGDE usually; or teaching qualifications recognised at least by one government somewhere in the globe).

    The third type, you will most likely need a degree. It's possible for you to teach without any qualifications, especially if you're white; but in this case there will be little job security or the pay will be bad. You're essentially a backpacker travelling around Asia hoping to earn that extra penny in this case.

    After obtaining a degree, many factors are involved in what jobs you'll land yourself with: Whether it's in a relevant discipline, which university it was from (the best from Oxbridge), and whether you have additionally qualifications (postgraduate degrees > qualified teacher status > PGDE/PGCE > CELTA). And it's a combination of factors: If your degree's from Oxford, you will land yourself jobs without experience, any other qualifications, or even had the degree in a relevant discipline.

    In your case, with bad GCSEs and not having a degree, you're definitely not looking into anything bright and long-term. You won't be hired to teach, with obvious reasons, school-leaving qualifications, which is the most intensive market in Asia. You could get jobs having 'chats' classes with children and possibly people of any age; you might be hired to tutor pupils who are below the age level for any public examination; you will be hired for very short modules in and out of school, eg weekend supplementary classes, drama classes. But with the last bunch, you won't be able to get a work visa with that; so you'll either get a study visa (by actually studying something there) or do it illegally whilst you're on a tourist's visa.
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    Thanks for all that information & sorry about the late reply. I guess I was being naive about thinking of getting into teaching would be so straightforward.

    I'm considering about going back into college even possibly University if I could get in to one. Want to learn a trade or a skill which would allow more employment opportunities in the future. Planing to emigrate in a few years if I get the opportunity too.

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