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    So I have looked in the past for a clear, concise overthrew of the requirements necessary to be accepted into an Ivy League University, for English students... and with little success (including TSR forums). Let's say the University is... Princeton or Yale, for the sake of this thread.

    I am aware SATs and extra curriculum activities are very important, though I've seen no mention of A-Levels or GCSEs, so does anyone have any idea what the full requirements are for English students?

    Thanks for reading, any help would really be appreciated.
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    (Original post by ZeFizzist)
    So I have looked in the past for a clear, concise overthrew of the requirements necessary to be accepted into an Ivy League University, for English students... and with little success (including TSR forums). Let's say the University is... Princeton or Yale, for the sake of this thread.

    I am aware SATs and extra curriculum activities are very important, though I've seen no mention of A-Levels or GCSEs, so does anyone have any idea what the full requirements are for English students?

    Thanks for reading, any help would really be appreciated.
    there's not really a set list of requirements. Yale and Princeton are two of the best universities in the world and so are extremely competitive (acceptance rates of 6-7%) and for international students it's even more competitive.

    To stand a decent chance at getting in to these universities, you need good GCSEs and A levels (by 'good' I mean a majority of A*s and As only). Your application would be looked at by an admissions officer who understands the British system, so they would understand exactly how your grades are. The SAT (or ACT) is very important too. It is the only way the universities can compare you with students from around the world/USA, so it is imperative that you do well -- ie. 2200+.

    Even with good grades alone though you won't get in. ECs, as you said, are important to American universities as well. When you apply to the US, you aren't applying for a specific course (major) as you do in the UK. You apply to the university then later on choose your course, so admissions offices want to see a rounded individual. Good teacher recommendations and essays are important too. Unlike the UK process where you submit one application via UCAS to 5 universities, in the US you submit individual applications with individual essays to multiple universities (all done through 'common application' which is like UCAS) so it's a very time consuming process.

    Luck plays quite a big role in it tbh. There are a lot of qualified students who don't get in, and you can't really predict how it'll go. Being 'different' from the other 30,000 applicants is something admissions officers look for, so try and focus on something that will separate you from the crowd.

    I'd suggest looking at http://www.fulbright.org.uk/ for more information on applying to American universities and http://www.collegeconfidential.com/ which is basically an American version of TSR, so you can get some more help there and check out what sort of things other people do to get in.

    Hope this helped
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    there's not really a set list of requirements. Yale and Princeton are two of the best universities in the world and so are extremely competitive (acceptance rates of 6-7%) and for international students it's even more competitive.

    To stand a decent chance at getting in to these universities, you need good GCSEs and A levels (by 'good' I mean a majority of A*s and As only). Your application would be looked at by an admissions officer who understands the British system, so they would understand exactly how your grades are. The SAT (or ACT) is very important too. It is the only way the universities can compare you with students from around the world/USA, so it is imperative that you do well -- ie. 2200+.

    Even with good grades alone though you won't get in. ECs, as you said, are important to American universities as well. When you apply to the US, you aren't applying for a specific course (major) as you do in the UK. You apply to the university then later on choose your course, so admissions offices want to see a rounded individual. Good teacher recommendations and essays are important too. Unlike the UK process where you submit one application via UCAS to 5 universities, in the US you submit individual applications with individual essays to multiple universities (all done through 'common application' which is like UCAS) so it's a very time consuming process.

    Luck plays quite a big role in it tbh. There are a lot of qualified students who don't get in, and you can't really predict how it'll go. Being 'different' from the other 30,000 applicants is something admissions officers look for, so try and focus on something that will separate you from the crowd.

    I'd suggest looking at http://www.fulbright.org.uk/ for more information on applying to American universities and http://www.collegeconfidential.com/ which is basically an American version of TSR, so you can get some more help there and check out what sort of things other people do to get in.

    Hope this helped
    Ah, thank you! Big help. However, I am possibly going to get around 5 A-levels at A/A* grade though my GCSEs, whilst having no C grades, aren't A/A* right across the board. Do you think excellent A-levels would make up for less than perfect GCSE grades (I'm aware this sometimes works with top UK ones)?
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    (Original post by ZeFizzist)
    Ah, thank you! Big help. However, I am possibly going to get around 5 A-levels at A/A* grade though my GCSEs, whilst having no C grades, aren't A/A* right across the board. Do you think excellent A-levels would make up for less than perfect GCSE grades (I'm aware this sometimes works with top UK ones)?
    What were your GCSE grades? Excellent A-level grades would potentially help (it would show an upward trajectory which is a good thing). If your GCSEs aren't stellar, then you will not only need really good A levels but to do well on the SAT. As long as they weren't bad then it should be fine.
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    What were your GCSE grades? Excellent A-level grades would potentially help (it would show an upward trajectory which is a good thing). If your GCSEs aren't stellar, then you will not only need really good A levels but to do well on the SAT. As long as they weren't bad then it should be fine.
    I certainly would not say bad (everything was above a C) but yes, not stellar A/A* across the board. SATs should be fine. Thank you very much for your help, really appreciated and it has given me a clearer overview regarding grades.
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    In my opinion, for schools like Harvard/Yale/Princeton, I would say everything needs to be top notch, especially grades. In a way, you're being compared to the rest of the international/UK applicants. Since grades can be so easily compared, you really want to have them the best they can be, maybe mostly A*s. If they aren't, an upward trend in grades is probably best. Most of the US applicants will typically have perfect grades, 4.0 GPA, near perfect SATS (when talking about the very top schools like HYP, I mean, there's a reason the acceptance rate is 5-10%!).
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    Im not an expert on this but I'm pretty sure that Ivy leagues are ultra keen on extracurriculars.

    And for an international, you need to have something extra ontop of great grades. Successful international applicants often have achievements at a national or international level just to put that it into perspective.

    Good luck.
 
 
 
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