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Ebola - Is anyone going to do anything about it?! Watch

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    It's all over the news, on TV, radio, internet and all types of social media about the deadly disease Ebola. There's already been over 10000s of incidence and no one is really doing anything about it. If Since it's being transmitted exponentially putting almost every country at a risk, we all have to ask ourselves, when will someone tackle this enormously scary disease? Why is it taking so long to come up with a solution?

    Share your thoughts on here and keep this thread updated with what organisations are coming up with to potentially protect us vulnerable humans against this such a deadly disease.

    I have a thread discussing Medical ethics in general, so check that out. It's done pretty recently so apologies for a lack of content. But you can help with the addition of content in it. Anytime. Feel free.
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    What makes you think nothing is being done about it? We still don't have a cure for cancer, would you say the same of that disease?
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    Of course lots is going on to tackle the current Ebola outbreak, even though I am not happy with the delay after which the world decided that this outbreak in West Africa is worth doing something against (see criticism by MSF etc. but not just the Western world i.e. Western governments and the WHO, also the local governments should have done something early on). On the other hand, not all countries are at risk and transmission is not easy as most people imagine: you do need to get in contact with body fluids of infected, symptomatic patients, and these body fluids must reach your body orifices (e.g. mouth or eyes) or wounds. It is also not true that it will take long to find a 'solution', e.g. a vaccine or even a therapeutic drug, compared to other diseases (the 'big three' infectious diseases HIV, malaria, TB, or non-communicable diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's). Vaccine development has progressed to clinical trials in humans and looks promising. Had we devoted more attention to a tropical disease like Ebola (it has been around for 39 years and not many cared about it as it occurred almost exclusively in Africa), we would have a vaccine already. If Ebola had occurred in London, it would have been controlled quickly plus vaccines and drugs would have been fast-tracked earlier.

    I could talk on about this for ages as I am writing an interdisciplinary dissertation on this Ebola outbreak and keep a critical eye on the news. Have you watched the film 'Outbreak' or read the book 'The Hot Zone'? These are all about Ebola outbreaks, both from the 90s, and they exactly fuel the fear so many people feel about this disease, claiming that it could become airborne and spread through all of the world. But this is very unlikely not only because of biology, but also because we do have facilities to control the disease at a global level.
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    Wikipedia: "The deaths were attributed to other diseases endemic to the area; it was not properly identified as Ebola until March 2014. The initial response by MSF, WHO and CDC seemed effective in April and May 2014, but, in fact, failed."

    So there was a response within weeks. But then they seemed to lose the plot and do bugger all.

    Oddly, no mention at all of Cuba's response in September in that Wikipedia entry. Details: "Dr Roberto Morales Ojeda, Minister of Public Health, has announced that Cuba will send a medical team of 165 people to Sierra Leone to help in the frontline in the Ebola response efforts. This is the largest offer of a foreign medical team from a single country during this outbreak."
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    (Original post by Add!ction)
    What makes you think nothing is being done about it? We still don't have a cure for cancer, would you say the same of that disease?
    Well, I don't understand why its taking so long for people to realise that it's a serious threat. As soon as someone white (sorry if I sound stereotypical, but just telling the truth) catches it, there's a rush and people do whatever they can to get to the issue but when 100s of African people die everyday no one really cares.

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    (Original post by f.loco)
    Well, I don't understand why its taking so long for people to realise that it's a serious threat. As soon as someone white (sorry if I sound stereotypical, but just telling the truth) catches it, there's a rush and people do whatever they can to get to the issue but when 100s of African people die everyday no one really cares.

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    It's not the fact that the person was white, it was that it was happening close to home.
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    (Original post by Add!ction)
    It's not the fact that the person was white, it was that it was happening close to home.
    I agree, but nevertheless, it's human life regardless of where on the globe
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    (Original post by yurilein93)
    Of course lots is going on to tackle the current Ebola outbreak, even though I am not happy with the delay after which the world decided that this outbreak in West Africa is worth doing something against (see criticism by MSF etc. but not just the Western world i.e. Western governments and the WHO, also the local governments should have done something early on). On the other hand, not all countries are at risk and transmission is not easy as most people imagine: you do need to get in contact with body fluids of infected, symptomatic patients, and these body fluids must reach your body orifices (e.g. mouth or eyes) or wounds. It is also not true that it will take long to find a 'solution', e.g. a vaccine or even a therapeutic drug, compared to other diseases (the 'big three' infectious diseases HIV, malaria, TB, or non-communicable diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's). Vaccine development has progressed to clinical trials in humans and looks promising. Had we devoted more attention to a tropical disease like Ebola (it has been around for 39 years and not many cared about it as it occurred almost exclusively in Africa), we would have a vaccine already. If Ebola had occurred in London, it would have been controlled quickly plus vaccines and drugs would have been fast-tracked earlier.

    I could talk on about this for ages as I am writing an interdisciplinary dissertation on this Ebola outbreak and keep a critical eye on the news. Have you watched the film 'Outbreak' or read the book 'The Hot Zone'? These are all about Ebola outbreaks, both from the 90s, and they exactly fuel the fear so many people feel about this disease, claiming that it could become airborne and spread through all of the world. But this is very unlikely not only because of biology, but also because we do have facilities to control the disease at a global level.
    You've made some very valid points, I agree with all. I don't know what you mean by 'interdisciplinary dissertation'.

    Are u a medic?
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    (Original post by Simes)
    Wikipedia: "The deaths were attributed to other diseases endemic to the area; it was not properly identified as Ebola until March 2014. The initial response by MSF, WHO and CDC seemed effective in April and May 2014, but, in fact, failed."

    So there was a response within weeks. But then they seemed to lose the plot and do bugger all.

    Oddly, no mention at all of Cuba's response in September in that Wikipedia entry. Details: "Dr Roberto Morales Ojeda, Minister of Public Health, has announced that Cuba will send a medical team of 165 people to Sierra Leone to help in the frontline in the Ebola response efforts. This is the largest offer of a foreign medical team from a single country during this outbreak."
    I don't agree with the first part, but the second part is reasonable however 165 isn't going to make any difference
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    It doesn't exist.
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    (Original post by SHBK)
    It doesn't exist.
    What's it
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    (Original post by f.loco)
    What's it
    It: 'The Ebola crisis currently ongoing.'

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    (Original post by f.loco)
    It's all over the news, on TV, radio, internet and all types of social media about the deadly disease Ebola. There's already been over 10000s of incidence and no one is really doing anything about it. If Since it's being transmitted exponentially putting almost every country at a risk, we all have to ask ourselves, when will someone tackle this enormously scary disease? Why is it taking so long to come up with a solution?

    Share your thoughts on here and keep this thread updated with what organisations are coming up with to potentially protect us vulnerable humans against this such a deadly disease.

    I have a thread discussing Medical ethics in general, so check that out. It's done pretty recently so apologies for a lack of content. But you can help with the addition of content in it. Anytime. Feel free.
    My initial thought on your question? Lmao

    Ebola isn't even that big of a deal, total number of dead by Ebola (since its emergence) ~8k. If you want something to worry 'bout I'd start with AIDs, which claims ~half a millions lives PER year.

    Regardless a lot of work is still ongoing on it, candidate vaccines are tested, patients in Africa are educated about the transmission of the virus (and given antibodies where necessary) etc.
    It even came up on the virology section of my microbiology module.

    It never ceases to amaze me how the media scares the crap out of ignorant people
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    (Original post by f.loco)
    You've made some very valid points, I agree with all. I don't know what you mean by 'interdisciplinary dissertation'.

    Are u a medic?
    Hey, I am studying Human Sciences so basically doing a bit (actually a lot) of human biology/biomed sciences and a bit of sociological sciences. But I've decided to do medicine so gonna start my med degree next autumn after my graduation this year!
    Interdisciplinary dissertation = looking at both scientific and non-scientific aspects and merging different perspectives e.g. that of infection/immunology, genomics and evolution, biology, epidemiology, history, ethics, sociopolitics, anthropology. My dissertation is going to be a holistic answer to the question why Ebola could have caused this outbreak.

    And of course, people posting above are in a way correct saying that 8000 deaths is nothing compared to the burden posed by AIDS, TB, malaria. And I fully agree about the media which 'scares the **** out of people'. But this outbreak is nonetheless an important event as it has some potential to make us learn how to deal with the problems restricted to the developed world, but I doubt we will all really change our attitude of 'othering'. We didn't learn this from HIV/AIDS, so perhaps Ebola is another chance.
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    I don't think enough is being done to contain the spread. There was a BBC breaking news article the other day saying somebody in Northampton had been diagnosed with it (oddly the article has totally disappeared) but the recent case of the nurse who came back told airport staff that she wasn't well and they still let her board. Every person returning from those infected countries poses a risk of spreading it and it seems they're just being allowed back into the country without proper checks/quarantine. Ebola has a very high kill rate and people are still catching it even with all the protective gear on. It's concerning.
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    There's the chance Ebola-chan is airbourne.

    Joking about the honorific -chan. I saw someone else do that in another forum and thought it would be the best to tell someone else. Multiple sources have mentioned it, such as the BBC, but discreetly. Not literally airborne, as the medium is water droplets in the air. That could have been wrong, but it could have been right.

    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    I don't think enough is being done to contain the spread. There was a BBC breaking news article the other day saying somebody in Northampton had been diagnosed with it (oddly the article has totally disappeared) but the recent case of the nurse who came back told airport staff that she wasn't well and they still let her board. Every person returning from those infected countries poses a risk of spreading it and it seems they're just being allowed back into the country without proper checks/quarantine. Ebola has a very high kill rate and people are still catching it even with all the protective gear on. It's concerning.
    The sarcasm was funny, if intentional.
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    (Original post by SHBK)
    It: 'The Ebola crisis currently ongoing.'

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    That's true for a few countries like Mali, but it's still a big issue in Sierra Leone

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    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    I don't think enough is being done to contain the spread. There was a BBC breaking news article the other day saying somebody in Northampton had been diagnosed with it (oddly the article has totally disappeared) but the recent case of the nurse who came back told airport staff that she wasn't well and they still let her board. Every person returning from those infected countries poses a risk of spreading it and it seems they're just being allowed back into the country without proper checks/quarantine. Ebola has a very high kill rate and people are still catching it even with all the protective gear on. It's concerning.
    Very true, it's truly a horrific disease, one to be weary off and fear

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    (Original post by Add!ction)
    What makes you think nothing is being done about it? We still don't have a cure for cancer, would you say the same of that disease?
    Why would anyone find a cure for cancer when a short term money making cure "chemotherapy" is available ?
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    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    Why would anyone find a cure for cancer when a short term money making cure "chemotherapy" is available ?
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    That's awful. You're awful.
 
 
 
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