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Petroleum engineering or Chemical engineering ? watch

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    I was hoping if someone could help me out with his question please.

    I've applied for chem eng at Leeds,Notts,Manchester,Loughboro ugh and sheffield.

    After graduating (if all goes well) I was hoping to go into the petrochemical sector, however I've seen that some of the unis I have applied to do petroleum engineering and the course its self is shorter too.

    I wondering, if I can change ( I think I will be able to as I have yet to get any offers) in terms of jobs and salary would the two be identical in the petrochemical sector ? and would petroleum engineering be somewhat easier compared to chem eng, as I hear chem eng is quite difficult.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by T-GiuR)
    I was hoping if someone could help me out with his question please.

    I've applied for chem eng at Leeds,Notts,Manchester,Loughboro ugh and sheffield.

    After graduating (if all goes well) I was hoping to go into the petrochemical sector, however I've seen that some of the unis I have applied to do petroleum engineering and the course its self is shorter too.

    I wondering, if I can change ( I think I will be able to as I have yet to get any offers) in terms of jobs and salary would the two be identical in the petrochemical sector ? and would petroleum engineering be somewhat easier compared to chem eng, as I hear chem eng is quite difficult.

    Thanks
    I remember thinking about studying Petroleum Engineering but was advised that perhaps doing Chemical Engineering is better as it is broader and can open up opportunities to several fields, some of which you may have never considered until doing the course and that sometimes people enter thinking they will do one thing but leave doing another. As far as I know your chances should be the same from the research I've done.
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    (Original post by arcanum96)
    I remember thinking about studying Petroleum Engineering but was advised that perhaps doing Chemical Engineering is better as it is broader and can open up opportunities to several fields, some of which you may have never considered until doing the course and that sometimes people enter thinking they will do one thing but leave doing another. As far as I know your chances should be the same from the research I've done.
    Thanks!

    In terms of the work done at uni, do you know if they similar or is Petroleum eng easier or less work ? As the one thing is really putting me off chem eng is the work load people keep talking about and how difficult the work is.

    If the jobs in the sector are similar work type and pay I'd be much more inclined to do petroleum over chem eng.
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    (Original post by T-GiuR)
    Thanks!

    In terms of the work done at uni, do you know if they similar or is Petroleum eng easier or less work ? As the one thing is really putting me off chem eng is the work load people keep talking about and how difficult the work is.

    If the jobs in the sector are similar work type and pay I'd be much more inclined to do petroleum over chem eng.
    I'm not actually very sure how workload would compare so unfortunately I can't really comment on that one! I've heard that too but if you're interested in what the course will entail that should help get you through I think.
    Look into it again how it is currently since it's been about a year since I did my research. If you're sure you want to go into petroleum then Petroleum Engineering will be fine, any doubts then definitely consider ChemEng more strongly.
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    (Original post by T-GiuR)
    I was hoping if someone could help me out with his question please.

    I've applied for chem eng at Leeds,Notts,Manchester,Loughboro ugh and sheffield.

    After graduating (if all goes well) I was hoping to go into the petrochemical sector, however I've seen that some of the unis I have applied to do petroleum engineering and the course its self is shorter too.

    I wondering, if I can change ( I think I will be able to as I have yet to get any offers) in terms of jobs and salary would the two be identical in the petrochemical sector ? and would petroleum engineering be somewhat easier compared to chem eng, as I hear chem eng is quite difficult.

    Thanks
    If you just want to work in the petrochemicals sector then study chemical. In fact petroleum engineering has little, if anything, to do with petrochemicals, which are chemical products derived from petroleum; petroleum engineering is about extracting hydrocarbons from reservoirs in an efficient and economical way.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    If you just want to work in the petrochemicals sector then study chemical. In fact petroleum engineering has little, if anything, to do with petrochemicals, which are chemical products derived from petroleum; petroleum engineering is about extracting hydrocarbons from reservoirs in an efficient and economical way.
    Thank you for the info
    Probably stick with chem eng then.

    Do you know, if the courses are similar ? in terms of content and work ect... ?
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    (Original post by T-GiuR)
    Thank you for the info
    Probably stick with chem eng then.

    Do you know, if the courses are similar ? in terms of content and work ect... ?
    I don't do either course, but I'd imagine that petroleum has some overlap with chemical in terms of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Petroleum engineering is essentially a degree that specifically trains you to become a petroleum engineer, which is one of many engineering positions that exist within the upstream side of the oil & gas industry. Chemical engineering is a traditional engineering discipline that provides a broad range of skills useful to most of the main engineering industries of the world.

    I think petroleum engineering is a good degree to do if you know you want to become a petroleum engineer because it'll provide you a strong skill set for doing so - many degrees make use of industry standard software and incorporate field trips, make use of industry case-studies etc.

    Overall I don't think it's fair to compare chemical with petroleum engineering.
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    Nice reply
    What would be the starting salary for PEs?
    Can a BEng degree in PE allow you to work overseas immediately?
    Would you say theres a lot of Geology involved.
    Could a PE graduate work potentially at, for example, a stoxk broker/IB etc?
    (Original post by Smack)
    I don't do either course, but I'd imagine that petroleum has some overlap with chemical in terms of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Petroleum engineering is essentially a degree that specifically trains you to become a petroleum engineer, which is one of many engineering positions that exist within the upstream side of the oil & gas industry. Chemical engineering is a traditional engineering discipline that provides a broad range of skills useful to most of the main engineering industries of the world.

    I think petroleum engineering is a good degree to do if you know you want to become a petroleum engineer because it'll provide you a strong skill set for doing so - many degrees make use of industry standard software and incorporate field trips, make use of industry case-studies etc.

    Overall I don't think it's fair to compare chemical with petroleum engineering.
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    (Original post by schindlers list)
    Nice reply
    What would be the starting salary for PEs?
    Can a BEng degree in PE allow you to work overseas immediately?
    Would you say theres a lot of Geology involved.
    Could a PE graduate work potentially at, for example, a stoxk broker/IB etc?
    Don't know really, as I didn't do it, but I would imagine that it contains a fair bit of geology.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I don't do either course, but I'd imagine that petroleum has some overlap with chemical in terms of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Petroleum engineering is essentially a degree that specifically trains you to become a petroleum engineer, which is one of many engineering positions that exist within the upstream side of the oil & gas industry. Chemical engineering is a traditional engineering discipline that provides a broad range of skills useful to most of the main engineering industries of the world.

    I think petroleum engineering is a good degree to do if you know you want to become a petroleum engineer because it'll provide you a strong skill set for doing so - many degrees make use of industry standard software and incorporate field trips, make use of industry case-studies etc.

    Overall I don't think it's fair to compare chemical with petroleum engineering.
    Thanks
    Having a look online and the working hours for Pet Eng are upto 60h a week which is crazy! despite having a higher salary. Also involves working on rigs and such so I think I'll just stick with chem eng.

    Thanks for the help
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    Not that bad? 12hrs/5days/week
    (Original post by T-GiuR)
    Thanks
    Having a look online and the working hours for Pet Eng are upto 60h a week which is crazy! despite having a higher salary. Also involves working on rigs and such so I think I'll just stick with chem eng.

    Thanks for the help
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Don't know really, as I didn't do it, but I would imagine that it contains a fair bit of geology.
    Pls i know you know quite a bit about this degree
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    (Original post by schindlers list)
    Nice reply
    What would be the starting salary for PEs?
    Can a BEng degree in PE allow you to work overseas immediately?
    Would you say theres a lot of Geology involved.
    Could a PE graduate work potentially at, for example, a stoxk broker/IB etc?
    I had a look and they have a slight higher salary then chem eng, however from what I have read, the working hours are extremely long at times, and are very tedious. You can have a single 24h shift whether that be on the rig or on an office. You will always be travelling or will work in a very remote, dead area (like on the rigs at sea, or in deserts) and expect to stay a long time abroad. You also need to be available on short notice in case of any emergency.

    Yes the pay is higher but I think all those reasons dont justify the reasoning of doing Pet eng over chem, as well as the fact you are limited with Pet eng. Chem eng has a huge variatey and pet eng is focused just at Pet. Once all the oils gone then your gonna be stuck for job. And if you plan on having a family later on during you life, you have to consider the fact that you will be away most of the time.

    As for "Smack", he's done his best to help and we should appreciate his efforts.
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    (Original post by T-GiuR)
    Thanks
    Having a look online and the working hours for Pet Eng are upto 60h a week which is crazy! despite having a higher salary. Also involves working on rigs and such so I think I'll just stick with chem eng.

    Thanks for the help
    I think it depends a lot on where you work. In the UK the oil companies typically offer a very strong work/life balance.
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    Thanks
    And regarding oil running out, have you done any research? Oil will be avaliable for a good amount of decades. Its how people view finite resources and they fact they're "finite", doesnt mean they'll run out tomorrow night.
    Im not limiting my potential careers, petroleum engineers and engineers can most likely work as an IB etc.
    Could you remind me on the salary of a PE please?
    Thanks
    (Original post by T-GiuR)
    I had a look and they have a slight higher salary then chem eng, however from what I have read, the working hours are extremely long at times, and are very tedious. You can have a single 24h shift whether that be on the rig or on an office. You will always be travelling or will work in a very remote, dead area (like on the rigs at sea, or in deserts) and expect to stay a long time abroad. You also need to be available on short notice in case of any emergency.

    Yes the pay is higher but I think all those reasons dont justify the reasoning of doing Pet eng over chem, as well as the fact you are limited with Pet eng. Chem eng has a huge variatey and pet eng is focused just at Pet. Once all the oils gone then your gonna be stuck for job. And if you plan on having a family later on during you life, you have to consider the fact that you will be away most of the time.

    As for "Smack", he's done his best to help and we should appreciate his efforts.
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    How many hours can this be? 40hrs/week?
    (Original post by Smack)
    I think it depends a lot on where you work. In the UK the oil companies typically offer a very strong work/life balance.
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    (Original post by schindlers list)
    How many hours can this be? 40hrs/week?
    Typically. Sometimes more depending on workload.
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    (Original post by schindlers list)
    How many hours can this be? 40hrs/week?
    Dont know about the UK, but I've been looking abroad in places such as the US and gulf countries like Dubai and Qatar. they pay the most for these kind of jobs.

    They get around $160,000 to $200,000.
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    Is this starting salary?
    (Original post by T-GiuR)
    Dont know about the UK, but I've been looking abroad in places such as the US and gulf countries like Dubai and Qatar. they pay the most for these kind of jobs.

    They get around $160,000 to $200,000.
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    (Original post by schindlers list)
    Is this starting salary?
    lol no.
    The starting is around £25k - £36, ones of the highest paying stating salaries.
 
 
 
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