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    B734 - Teachers and School Bill 2015, The Hon. Nigel Farage MP
    Teachers and School Act 2015





    An Act to overhaul schools in Britain.




    BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

    1: Types of schools


    1) Secondary School
    2) Grammar School
    3) Advanced Upper Secondary School
    4) Vocational School

    Article II: Secondary School

    1: Structure

    1) From age 7 to age 16 incorporating 9 grades
    2) All schools will be limited to a maximum of 1250 pupils
    3) Each class will be limited to a maximum of 25 students
    4) The school day will start at 9am and finish at 4.15pm with a 15 minute break in the morning and a 1 hour lunch.

    2: Testing

    1) Informal biannual testing in December and July will take place from ages 11-12 (grade 5)
    2) The tests will be used to identify weak spots.
    3) Testing will be a mixture of verbal tests, a small written test and continuous classroom monitoring from the teacher.
    4) The result will be a report card graded with a mark 4 to 10.
    5) Children achieving a 4 will be given 2 hours a week one-to-one tutoring, and extra support to help them improve.
    6) Children who score 4 in two report cards in the same school year will be placed in Special Support list.
    7) Special Support will provide 5 hours a week one-on-one support with a grant for state-funded tutors outside of school.
    8) If the child receives another 4 on the December report card in the following year they will be asked to re-sit the previous year.
    9) Consecutive 4’s will result in the child not advancing to the next year until a 5 or above has been reached.

    3: Subjects

    1) In grade 7 children can choose to focus on optional subjects alongside the compulsory subjects they started in Grade 1.
    2) The compulsory subjects are:
    i) Group 1: Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, English Language, English Literature
    ii) Group 2: Cookery, Carpentry, Metalwork, ICT, History
    3) Each Group 1 receive 3 hours of teaching per week.
    4) One Group 2 subject will be chosen by the child and receive 2 hours of teaching per week. The subject is changed each year.
    5) Citizenship (inc. banking, money skills, first aid, using emergency services, road safety, sex education) is compulsory and taught for one hour a week.
    6) Optional subjects are:
    i) History, Geography, Computing, Economics, Religious Studies, Music, Art, Design Technology, Language Options
    ii) Children can choose as many optional subjects as their timetable allows.
    7) From Grade 1 to Grade 9 all children will be required to choose and study two languages on top of English for 1 hour per week for one language, and two hours per week for the other language.
    i) Options: French, Spanish, German, Mandarin, Italian, Welsh

    4: Advanced Testing

    1) Each subject receives 10 credits upon successful completion in Grade 9.
    2) Children need 100 credits, including credits in all compulsory subjects, to advance to Academic Upper Secondary Schooling.
    3) Any child may choose to attend a Vocational School after completing Grade 9.

    5: Extra-Curricular Activities

    1) State-funded extra-curricular sports schemes will replace physical education in schools.
    2) Homework will be minimal to make time for extra-curricular activities.

    Article III: Grammar School

    1: Structure

    1) From age 7 to age 16 incorporating 9 grades
    2) All schools will be limited to a maximum of 1000 pupils
    3) Each class will be limited to a maximum of 20 students
    4) The school day will start at 9am and finish at 4.15pm with a 15 minute break in the morning and a 1 hour lunch.

    2: Entry

    1) Grammar Schools Entry exams set by a government-controlled exam board will set entry tests to grammar school.
    2) The highest scoring children up to a maximum of 700 will be offered a place at grammar school.
    3) Children have the opportunity to enter grammar school at any other grade level after Grade 1 upon completion of a test set by the individual grammar school, and at the grammar schools decision.
    4) At the end of Grade 9 a government-issued test will be available for children wishing to join grammar school instead of Academic Secondary Upper School or a Vocational School.
    5) 250 places will be available for the highest scoring students.

    3: Internal Testing

    1) There will be testing every two years from Grade 4 in July with those who fail being given one chance to re-sit in August.
    2) Failing the re-sit will result in the child being moved to Secondary School.
    3) The internal tests will be set by the school following guidelines laid out by the government exam board setting the entry tests.

    4: Subjects

    1) From Grade 1 children will study the following compulsory subjects for 3 hours per week.
    2) The compulsory subjects are: Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, English Language, English Literature, and two chosen languages.
    3) Citizenship (inc. banking, money skills, first aid, using emergency services, road safety, sex education) will be compulsory and be taught for 1 hour per week.
    4) One of the following will be studies for 1 hour per week and will be chosen by the child: Cookery, Carpentry, Metalwork, ICT.
    5) Optional subjects are History, Geography, Economics, and further language options with each receiving three hours per week.
    i) Children can choose as many optional subjects as their timetable allows.
    6) From Grade 10 onward students will study 6 chosen subjects with 5 hours of teaching per week.

    5: Language Options for subsection 4.5

    1) French, Spanish, German, Mandarin, Italian, Welsh

    Article IV: Academic Upper Secondary School

    1: Structure

    1) From age 16 to age 19 incorporating 3 grades
    2) All schools will be limited to a maximum of 300 pupils
    3) Each class will be limited to a maximum of 20 students
    4) Advanced Secondary Schools may be attached to Secondary Schools but the entry requirements will apply to all children.
    5) The school day will start at 9am and finish at 4.15pm with a 15 minute break in the morning and a 1 hour lunch.

    2: Entry

    1) Students are required to have a minimum of 100 credits in total with credits in each compulsory subject.

    3: Subjects

    1) Children may choose to study the following subjects:
    Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Language Options (same as Secondary School), Economics, English, Geography, History, Philosophy, Art, Religious Studies, and additional subjects specific to the school but approved by the Department of Education.
    2) Each subject will receive 6 hours a week of teaching.
    3) Students will choose 5 subjects.

    4: Testing

    1) Pupils will sit Pre-Further Education exams in all of their chose subjects. The exams will be set by the government exam board.
    2) Each paper will be awarded with a percentage score with its own report, and an individual academic report issued by the school allowing universities and employers to have a more complete picture of a pupil’s academic abilities.

    Article V: Technical School

    1: Subjects:

    1) Students have a choice of studying the following:
    Access to further education, accounting, adult essential skills, assessor and internal verifier, bricklaying, business, carpentry, childcare, counselling, digital marketing, DIY, early years education, education, electrical engineering, engineering, home economics, foundation and entry level programmes, graphic design, hair and beauty, Therapy, health and safety, human resources, IT and computing, management, media, music and performing arts, photography, plumbing, psychology, public services.

    2: Structure

    1) Students may study a maximum of two subjects funded by the state with the optional of studying additional subjects paid for by themselves.

    Article VI: University

    1: Structure

    1) The university year will start in January and finish in December with universities allowed to choose their term dates.

    2: Entry

    1) Entry is at a university’s discretion.

    Article VII: Control

    1) All schools apart from Technical Schools will be government owned and operated.

    2) The Department of Education will be responsible for quality management of all schools in England and Wales.

    3) The Local Education Authority be responsible for distributing funding to schools, drawing up catchment areas, and arranging help for special needs children.

    4) Individual school policies and term dates will be drawn up by the school with no input from the LEA.

    5) Each school will be inspected every 2 years.

    Article IX: National Curriculum

    1) The national curriculum will be itemised by the Department of Education covering the specific subjects available.
    2) Individual schools and teachers have control over the teaching methods, the order of teaching, and learning materials used.

    Article X: Teaching Requirements

    1) All teachers at any level will be required to have a Master’s degree and a minimum of one year’s application of their subject before applying for a teacher training course lasting one year.
    2) Individual teachers will be assessed during the school inspections occurring every 2 years.

    Article XI: Expansion

    1) A fund will be made available to build extra schools to fit the size requirements laid out above.

    Article XI: Short Title, Commencement, and Extent

    1) This bill, when passed, may be referred to as the Teaching and Schools Act 2015
    2) This act shall come into force on the 1st September 2022.
    3) This act shall extend to England
    4) this act shall accompany the Grammar Schools Act 2015 and overwrite all previous education related acts.

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    Usually I'm fairly sympathetic to UKIP policy on education, but I don't feel the need for a total reorganisation like this. A bit odd to start secondary school at age 7, and actually controlling the length and timings of the school day is an act of extreme centralised control that would shame even the French. (Plus talking about "grades" instead of "years". :mad:)

    There's certainly room for a mix-up in the higher years, but it doesn't need to be this radical.
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    I want to study history, law, psychology and government and politics.

    What do I do?
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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    I want to study history, law, psychology and government and politics.

    What do I do?
    History is an optional subject in each school so you could choose it. The others may be available in the upper secondary school as according to Article 4, subsection 3.1 once approved by the Department of Education. Otherwise you will have to wait until university where you could take a module in it.

    (Original post by O133)
    A bit odd to start secondary school at age 7
    I believe radical is needed as minor tweaking does not work. We are visionaries and we are ahead of the game here with this proposal. I would like to point you to a report by the University of Cambridge back the idea of starting school age 7. Starting before leads to learning too much, too soon. Starting later is also common among European countries scoring above Britain in world education standards. There's also the large cost saving to be made which can be reinvested.
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    This does all seem rather arbitary.Major questions on implementation too. What happens to primary schools? How are you dealing with secondaries now deemed too big? How are you funding this reduction in class sizes? What is the point of setting out the repurcussions of "grade four" without setting out an objective measure of what level of acheivment such a grade actually implies? Why do schools now have to have the same opening times, closing times etc rather than being left to determine them on local needs? Do academies and free schools which now dominate the secondary sector retain their freedoms, which would make this Bill almost entirely pointless? Why can I study Welsh (presumably at schools in Wales), but not Gaelic in Northern Ireland? And now you've set out all the options, how on this Earth is every school going to find teachers to cover not only the modern European languages but Welsh and Mandarin should their pupils demand it? How are the approved additional subjects, or the other for that matter, to be assessed? What is the reason for having a university year that doesn't fit in with the general academic year, or the European model which will affect Erasmus students going in either direction? If entry is at their discretion, does this mean the state will now fund unlimited numbers of students at any university that wishes to take them? I appreciate the effort that's clearly gone into this Bill, but for me it's aiming to do too much and ends up actually raising far more questions than it resolves, so it's a Nay from me.
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    (Original post by Green_Pink)
    QFA


    How are you dealing with secondaries now deemed too big? How are you funding this reduction in class sizes?

    The 10 year period until implementation gives time for new schools to be built to accommodate overflow from schools currently too large.

    How are you funding this reduction in class sizes?

    Educating children from the age of 7 saves a lot of money. With each child starting at age 7, that's 4 fewer school years to fund. With 8.3 million school children in Britain, and 15 school years, it works out at about 553,000 per school year. Knocking 4 years off education where the government is spending £4500 per year per pupil, that gives a saving off £9.9bn per year! This is enough to pay for more schools, more teachers, and smaller class sizes.

    Do academies and free schools which now dominate the secondary sector retain their freedoms, which would make this Bill almost entirely pointless?

    As per Article X section 4, all other bills regarding education are to be overwritten. Repealed would have been a better choice of words but the idea is the entire education system would change to fit this bill.

    Why can I study Welsh (presumably at schools in Wales), but not Gaelic in Northern Ireland?

    This bill only extends to England and Wales.

    And now you've set out all the options, how on this Earth is every school going to find teachers to cover not only the modern European languages but Welsh and Mandarin should their pupils demand it?

    As far as I am aware Welsh is compulsory in Welsh schools so there would already be Welsh teachers available. There may be a shortage of Mandarin teachers initially but local schools sharing pupils on an agreement constructed locally would help bypass shortages. I would also be critical of a predicting sighting a mass shortage as I do not see Mandarin being a hugely popular choice.

    How are the approved additional subjects, or the other for that matter, to be assessed?

    In the same way the department assesses GCSE subjects.

    What is the reason for having a university year that doesn't fit in with the general academic year, or the European model which will affect Erasmus students going in either direction?

    Every summer we see student in tears over their results. Not because they haven't met their offers but because a marking error which is later corrected has resulted in the university being given incorrect information. By having a long delay between results and starting university pressure can be eased on marking, on remarking, and on the university. The students will not need to panic as much if their results are not as expected. I accept there could be difficulties with Erasmus but there is no hardship in waiting for a few months to sync up before exchanging. Exchanges happen every year with countries whose university year starts in January.

    If entry is at their discretion, does this mean the state will now fund unlimited numbers of students at any university that wishes to take them?

    Funding for university should be on a per institution basis and not necessarily a per student basis. While the funding should be equivalent per student between most institutions, a per student basis encourages institutions to pull in as many students as possible for extra funding. Currently we have institutions charging lots while offering little to make more money. Universities also choose at their discretion now. It is only recently where political pressure has started to encourage universities to discriminate based on more than talent.

    What happens to primary schools?

    They can continue to exist but will slowly be converted over to one of the above types either through extensive expansion, or if that's not possible, be closed with pupils being transferred.

    What is the point of setting out the repurcussions of "grade four" without setting out an objective measure of what level of acheivment such a grade actually implies?

    It charts pupil development more than a formal way of assessing children. It is taken straight from the Danish education system where teachers give their overall assessment of a child. The extra tutoring given to children falling behind in the teacher's eyes helps pick them up and keep them on the same level as their peers.

    ...
    ends up actually raising far more questions than it resolves, so it's a Nay from me.

    Not trying to score political points here but a bill handing over control of who decides the minimum wage to a campaigning pressure group does not?

    This is a radical step but I would like to reassure you it's not something drawn up in half and hour. It has taken weeks of research into different education systems, reading reports into child development, and thinking how to implement it.

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    So some subjects are more Importent? Oh and good to see religious education not included from the party who doesn't tolerate others :teehee:
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    I think this is interesting. I might support, but I have a couple of questions:

    1. So it means the government will control all universities?
    2. Why have universities start in January? Or rather, why make that compulsory?
    3. Will we have private schools, still?
    4. Why call 'secondary schools' secondary when there will be no primary?
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    Also grammar schools by your legislation there can only be 7 in the country:erm:
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    (Original post by clh_hilary)
    I think this is interesting. I might support, but I have a couple of questions:

    1. So it means the government will control all universities?
    2. Why have universities start in January? Or rather, why make that compulsory?
    3. Will we have private schools, still?
    4. Why call 'secondary schools' secondary when there will be no primary?
    1. The government will only require the term to start in January, provide funding, and set entry exams similar to A-levels from the government exam board.

    2. Every summer we see student in tears over their results. Not because they haven't met their offers but because a marking error which is later corrected has resulted in the university being given incorrect information. By having a long delay between results and starting university pressure can be eased on marking, on remarking, and on the university in trying to find students as everyone can apply already knowing their grades. The students will not need to panic as much if their results are not as expected.

    3. Yes, there has been no actual legislation for private schools so this bill wouldn't replace any. Private schools would still exist but the idea is to improve state education to a point where private schools become worthless. If the gap between state and private is closed there will be no need to go private.

    4. Fair point.

    (Original post by Aph)
    Also grammar schools by your legislation there can only be 7 in the country:erm:
    I am afraid I do not follow, Aph.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    I am afraid I do not follow, Aph.
    From parts one and two of grammar schools
    2) All schools will be limited to a maximum of 1000 pupils
    2) The highest scoring children up to a maximum of 700 will be offered a place at grammar school

    given that there are 9 grades we can assume that there are a maximum of 111 people per grade. And as 700 people in each year in the country will get the option to go to we can only have 7 grammar schools.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    2. Every summer we see student in tears over their results. Not because they haven't met their offers but because a marking error which is later corrected has resulted in the university being given incorrect information. By having a long delay between results and starting university pressure can be eased on marking, on remarking, and on the university in trying to find students as everyone can apply already knowing their grades. The students will not need to panic as much if their results are not as expected.
    It won't 100% solve the problem though, the Cambridge admissions process has been endless months of paperwork.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    From parts one and two of grammar schools

    given that there are 9 grades we can assume that there are a maximum of 111 people per grade. And as 700 people in each year in the country will get the option to go to we can only have 7 grammar schools.
    You have misunderstood it. The 700 is per school and not every school. The difference between the 1000 and 700 is so there is space available for pupils wanting to join grammar school later or at the end of secondary school instead of going to an upper secondary school.

    (Original post by O133)
    It won't 100% solve the problem though, the Cambridge admissions process has been endless months of paperwork.
    It will go some way to solving the problem. Having university start at the end of January, and exam results come back in early August gives over 5 months to apply which is longer than there is now from September in the A2 year to when Oxbridge start notifying students of their decision around mid-January.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    You have misunderstood it. The 700 is per school and not every school. The difference between the 1000 and 700 is so there is space available for pupils wanting to join grammar school later or at the end of secondary school instead of going to an upper secondary school.
    Then you don't understand what you have said. Because the 1000 clearly applies to all years not each specific year. And no school is going to have a year over 150 students when limited to 1000 students.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    Then you don't understand what you have said. Because the 1000 clearly applies to all years not each specific year. And no school is going to have a year over 150 students when limited to 1000 students.
    I understand you now. Yes, quite right, there is a mistake there. Each intake will be significantly smaller than the 1000 limit as that applies to all years. The 700 is an error as it does not make sense at all. Thanks for pointing that out, it will be corrected.
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    All teachers at any level will be required to have a master’s degree and a minimum of one year’s application of their subject before applying for a teacher training course lasting one year.
    This killed it for me, there will not be enough teachers available and I would not assume that many people with master's degrees would want to work at a primary school.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    I understand you now. Yes, quite right, there is a mistake there. Each intake will be significantly smaller than the 1000 limit as that applies to all years. The 700 is an error as it does not make sense at all. Thanks for pointing that out, it will be corrected.
    It's ok, this is a UKIP bill I don't expect the math to make sense anymore
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    History is an optional subject in each school so you could choose it. The others may be available in the upper secondary school as according to Article 4, subsection 3.1 once approved by the Department of Education. Otherwise you will have to wait until university where you could take a module in it.
    Well that isn't very good.

    It's a nay from me.
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    There are some things that I like about this bill, but other things I dislike. Abstain.

    (Also- I will clarify what I like and dislike, but only when I'm on a computer, as my iPad glitches the Quick reply system...)
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    What's the point?

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