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    Hello everyone! New here to TSR, and I'm looking for some answers to a few questions I have about UK university. So to start off, I am a natural born UK citizen, but I've been living in the US for quite a long time now. I'm currently in my first semester of university here in the United States, but I'm hating it for personal reasons. So I've been looking into maybe going to university in the UK instead. So, now for my questions.

    Since I am a UK citizen, with all the appropriate documents, would I count as an overseas student or not? If that's a yes, to become a regular applicant, I would just have to move back to the UK and prove residency?

    Secondly, all my schooling has been completed in the US. If I was to apply to a UK university, how would that work? And would I be better off taking GCSE's and/or A-Levels instead (especially since I never took IB in the US)?

    Lastly, if the best option is to take my GCSE's/A-Levels, how would I go about doing that, since the time to do them traditionally has obviously passed.


    Thanks in advance!

    -S
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    To be a UK student for fees purposes you need to have been resident in the UK or EU for 3 years prior to the start of your course.

    In terms of qualifications most UK unis prefer US applicants to have APs in relevant subjects - you should be able to find more details on the websites of the unis you're interested in. Some may accept you US uni study as a substitute.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    To be a UK student for fees purposes you need to have been resident in the UK or EU for 3 years prior to the start of your course.

    In terms of qualifications most UK unis prefer US applicants to have APs in relevant subjects - you should be able to find more details on the websites of the unis you're interested in. Some may accept you US uni study as a substitute.
    I don't want to apply as a US applicant though, partially because I goofed around in school and didn't get top notch grades, and partially because overseas fees would murder me. Is there any hope for me, short of moving back to the UK and waiting out the three years?
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    (Original post by B34TZ)
    I don't want to apply as a US applicant though, partially because I goofed around in school and didn't get top notch grades, and partially because overseas fees would murder me. Is there any hope for me, short of moving back to the UK and waiting out the three years?
    Not really I'm afraid.

    There is a loop hole if you can prove that you have been living abroad for a temporary period (but it is difficult to prove and usually requires things like your family having fixed term contracts of employment and maintaining a house in the UK while living away).

    You don't have to move back to the UK - you could live and work anywhere in the EU and a few other european countries. Depending what degree you want to do/what careers you're interested in then 3 years of wandering europe working your way could be a real boost.
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    (Original post by B34TZ)
    I don't want to apply as a US applicant though, partially because I goofed around in school and didn't get top notch grades, and partially because overseas fees would murder me. Is there any hope for me, short of moving back to the UK and waiting out the three years?
    No, sorry. The three year residency requirement is non-negotiable.

    Also, you won't qualify for Home/UK fee and funding status if you only move back to the UK to build up years of residency so you can go to uni. You'll need to have another plausible reason for coming to live back in the UK, unrelated to education e.g. getting a job over here, or to spend time with elderly relatives etc.

    If you didn't get good grades in school, there's no guarantee that a UK uni would take you without further study anyway. You might want to research entry requirements before going further with plans. Students with poor school results can get into uni, but you might need to more qualifications such as a one year Access to Higher Education course.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Not really I'm afraid.

    There is a loop hole if you can prove that you have been living abroad for a temporary period (but it is difficult to prove and usually requires things like your family having fixed term contracts of employment and maintaining a house in the UK while living away).

    You don't have to move back to the UK - you could live and work anywhere in the EU and a few other european countries. Depending what degree you want to do/what careers you're interested in then 3 years of wandering europe working your way could be a real boost.
    That loop hole probably wouldn't apply to me, since I've been living abroad for over a decade and have a green card and all. Ah well.

    (Original post by Klix88)
    No, sorry. The three year residency requirement is non-negotiable.

    Also, you won't qualify for Home/UK fee and funding status if you only move back to the UK to build up years of residency so you can go to uni. You'll need to have another plausible reason for coming to live back in the UK, unrelated to education e.g. getting a job over here, or to spend time with elderly relatives etc.

    If you didn't get good grades in school, there's no guarantee that a UK uni would take you without further study anyway. You might want to research entry requirements before going further with plans. Students with poor school results can get into uni, but you might need to more qualifications such as a one year Access to Higher Education course.
    I was planning on doing further study anyway, to boost my application(s).


    Oh well, thanks for the advice then. Guess I'll have to think on it.
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    You could always consider moving here and doing an access course. An access course is specifically for mature students, offer fantastic support in UCAS applications and you would also have British qualifications. You can take one part time for 2 years, allowing time to work, save some money before uni and also concentrate on scoring Merits to allow you to apply for the best schools. Thus you would only need one year on top of work or other relevant experience, rather than 'waiting out' three.
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    (Original post by ThydaB)
    You could always consider moving here and doing an access course. An access course is specifically for mature students, offer fantastic support in UCAS applications and you would also have British qualifications. You can take one part time for 2 years, allowing time to work, save some money before uni and also concentrate on scoring Merits to allow you to apply for the best schools. Thus you would only need one year on top of work or other relevant experience, rather than 'waiting out' three.
    Well I'm only 18 years old as of right now, so would I count as a 'mature student'? And what sort of qualifications would it give me?
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    By the time you have come over, completed 2 years and waited a third you will definitely be a mature student. There are a lot of different access courses, but at the end they will give you A level equivalent qualifications. Google some options and have a look
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    Just to emphasise - it's vital that if you come to the UK, you must make it seem as though you're not coming here just for college/uni education.

    Doing so would mean that you would always be classed as an International student and would gave to pay top fees. You need to be able to prove that you've moved here for unrelated reasons.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Just to emphasise - it's vital that if you come to the UK, you must make it seem as though you're not coming here just for college/uni education.

    Doing so would mean that you would always be classed as an International student and would gave to pay top fees. You need to be able to prove that you've moved here for unrelated reasons.
    Agreed! however, depending on what the course is, the difference can be as little as £1,000 per year.
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    (Original post by ThydaB)
    Agreed! however, depending on what the course is, the difference can be as little as £1,000 per year.
    It isn't the fees though - it is entitlement to tuition fee loans and a loan to pay living costs that make a huge difference. Finding £10k pa up front for fees and funding everything from savings is a substantial cost.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    It isn't the fees though - it is entitlement to tuition fee loans and a loan to pay living costs that make a huge difference. Finding £10k pa up front for fees and funding everything from savings is a substantial cost.
    Are you sure you cannot use US student loans for study abroad? I have a few friends who have in the past..
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    (Original post by ThydaB)
    Are you sure you cannot use US student loans for study abroad? I have a few friends who have in the past..
    I qualify for very few US student loans.


    Thanks for the advice everyone else, definitely looking into Access Courses now.
 
 
 
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