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Not left the house in a good while Watch

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    I haven't left the house since my last doctors appointment in October. I stopped leaving the house in May for various reasons and I'm waiting on therapy and other help.

    I just wondered if any of you have suffered from this kind of thing or know anyone else's experience whether for days, weeks, months or even years and if they've managed to overcome it what helped? Also just general tips if you think they might be useful. One of the main reasons for my not leaving the house is health anxiety.

    My doctor said it's really rare for someone my age not to have left the house for this long which upset me but I've had a lot on and I know it's the weight of it all.

    Thanks in advance
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    I only leave the house for work.

    It's not down to any phobia or condition, I'm just a lazy ******* who likes to play games, and who has an understanding gal.
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    (Original post by A5ko)
    I only leave the house for work.

    It's not down to any phobia or condition, I'm just a lazy ******* who likes to play games, and(who has an understanding gal.
    Haha classic, makes me feel somewhat less of a freak I suppose and gives me the lols
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    weather is **** out here
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    (Original post by gen. AIDEED)
    weather is **** out here
    Yeah I've heard.

    *sinks further into the house*
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Yeah I've heard.

    *sinks further into the house*
    In my first year sixth form I had an operation on my backbone, i was stuck at home for 2 months, the hardest thing was making time go by, so i just got into gaming and watching movies lol
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I haven't left the house since my last doctors appointment in October. I stopped leaving the house in May for various reasons and I'm waiting on therapy and other help.

    I just wondered if any of you have suffered from this kind of thing or know anyone else's experience whether for days, weeks, months or even years and if they've managed to overcome it what helped? Also just general tips if you think they might be useful. One of the main reasons for my not leaving the house is health anxiety.

    My doctor said it's really rare for someone my age not to have left the house for this long which upset me but I've had a lot on and I know it's the weight of it all.

    Thanks in advance
    Well I had a surgery back in June last year that meant I had to stay in the house recovering for over 6 months(only times I got out were to go to the docs daily for dressing changes). I can sympathise with you, I know how it feels
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    I stay home a lot due to social anxiety Haven't left the house since november. I'm fine with it though
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I stay home a lot due to social anxiety Haven't left the house since november. I'm fine with it though
    Ah it's good that you're not in turmoil being cooped up. How old are old are you?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Ah it's good that you're not in turmoil being cooped up. How old are old are you?
    19, i'm on a gap year. How old are you?
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    Although you might think it's fine, it's not normal, it's not healthy, and you don't have to live this way. Get in touch with your GP to explain your issues and they will then help to set you on the road to recovery.

    There's a huge difference between not leaving your house because you don't want or need to (sometimes I don't go out all day if I have nothing to do, though I go mad if I stay in for two days) and not leaving because you just cannot force yourself to do it.

    You deserve to be free and able to live a better life. You also need to come to terms with the fact that this isn't going to get any better on its own.

    Confide in close friends and family to get their support, and then make the call to your GP (or ask them to do it if you can't).

    Social anxiety can be incredibly hard to shift, but with the right help - perhaps including medication and counselling, alongside family support - you can certainly get your life back.
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    (Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
    Although you might think it's fine, it's not normal, it's not healthy, and you don't have to live this way. Get in touch with your GP to explain your issues and they will then help to set you on the road to recovery.

    There's a huge difference between not leaving your house because you don't want or need to (sometimes I don't go out all day if I have nothing to do, though I go mad if I stay in for two days) and not leaving because you just cannot force yourself to do it.

    You deserve to be free and able to live a better life. You also need to come to terms with the fact that this isn't going to get any better on its own.

    Confide in close friends and family to get their support, and then make the call to your GP (or ask them to do it if you can't).

    Social anxiety can be incredibly hard to shift, but with the right help - perhaps including medication and counselling, alongside family support - you can certainly get your life back.
    Thanks appreciate the advise but my GP already knows and made his first home visit yesterday after I failed to make it to the other appoitments since October.

    And it's health anxiety and a lot of other stuff not just social anxiety. I don't think it's fine to be like this or normal it's just a horrible trap I got myself into.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    19, i'm on a gap year. How old are you?
    23
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    19, i'm on a gap year
    What're your plan's for after your gap year? And how dos your anxiety present itself like say you did go out on a typical day how might it affect you?
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    Plans*
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    I have social anxiety and I only really leave the house for college but I get really anxious and can suffer from minor panic attack. I've talked to my mum about it but she suffers for really bad depression so she has enough on her plate already my friends help though they know how I am and that they sometimes have to do things like order my food or ask questions for me if am having a bad day I think it's all about the support you get .


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    (Original post by MissMia1998)
    I have social anxiety and I only really leave the house for college but I get really anxious and can suffer from minor panic attack. I've talked to my mum about it but she suffers for really bad depression so she has enough on her plate already my friends help though they know how I am and that they sometimes have to do things like order my food or ask questions for me if am having a bad day I think it's all about the support you get .


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    It's really good that your friends are supportive. My problems would probably be halved if I had good friends. I don't really have anyone I fully trust not to judge me.
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    (Original post by marco14196)
    Well I had a surgery back in June last year that meant I had to stay in the house recovering for over 6 months(only times I got out were to go to the docs daily for dressing changes). I can sympathise with you, I know how it feels
    Aw hope you're enjoying being back out in the world heh . At least you get out to the doctors because of the whole agoraphobia I can't do that yet. Was it weird getting back to normal life or were you just super eager didn't think about it?
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    Go out, perhaps just for a while. Even if it's to do something like buying scented candles or getting a bubble bath mixture x
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Aw hope you're enjoying being back out in the world heh . At least you get out to the doctors because of the whole agoraphobia I can't do that yet. Was it weird getting back to normal life or were you just super eager didn't think about it?
    It's a little weird I would say, getting back out there. I am interviewing for my first job tomorrow which would be real great for me to get. My whole experience of the surgery has completely altered me as a person, arguably in a very positive way. Sure it was a horrendous experience and I lost a lot(financially its been a costly matter, socially its been costly and its cost me a whole year of uni that I have had to skip on so I don't start until September). My advice for your situation is just to think, thinking is really your best weapon as well as talking to other people. You can beat the agoraphobia. Try and do what I did which was thinking a lot and exploration of your mind. Try think of why you refuse to go out outside.
 
 
 
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