Turn on thread page Beta

how not to get insecure abut having done an inferior degree? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jambojim97)
    It's not WHAT you learn, it's HOW you learn.

    Rigorous arts degrees in traditional subjects (history, politics, languages, philosophy, classics &c) teach transferable skills in analysis, information presentation, critical thinking, debate, writing, research and the softies such as communication, time keeping etc.
    Obviously not worth as much as a STEM degree, but only because they are non-vocational, and thus don't directly qualify for a job: they're not worthless, just worth... less.

    1/ Arts degrees are only of value if studied at a top-tier institution. Second rate 'universities' have poor standards of teaching and are piss-easy to get a 2.1+
    2/ Arts graduates struggle to find employment post-graduation because they often do not know what they want to do when they start, hence the arts degree. Have a pre-defined, graduate level career path in mind, and get relevant work experience alongside your degree. Problem solved.
    3/ Many professional sectors and industries require a degree these days. Whether it's morally okay to ask someone to splash out 27k is another question. Fact remains that many jobs are non degree specific.
    is this not proof that certain actions and skill-sets are of more value to society than other actions and skill-sets, and those without are therefore of less value to society-and by extension in the event of a desert island scenario with limited resources without said skill-set would be first to get eaten/shot/drowned?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    It's been done now, get over it.

    Think of how you can use that degree to your advantage.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    is this not proof that certain actions and skill-sets are of more value to society than other actions and skill-sets, and those without are therefore of less value to society-and by extension in the event of a desert island scenario with limited resources without said skill-set would be first to get eaten/shot/drowned?
    No.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    This is definitely not true. There are countless people, throughout history, who have shaped the world around them through creativity; just think of all of the writers who have shaped language, philosophers who have shaped society, and artists who have shaped... well, whatever their art is centred on. Sure, in the current society, scientists and lawyers will be valued over teachers and authors, but it definitely has to be understood that every single subject, be it art, or medicine, has an integral part in society's function. Think of it this way: if a scientist has no creativity, they will never succeed, because they are unable to think outside of their pragmatic box.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    It's been done now, get over it.

    Think of how you can use that degree to your advantage.
    ?

    you're not answering the question, you're dismissing it
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jambojim97)
    No.

    why not? Disregard the hyperbole in the last sentence if you must.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Embla)
    This is definitely not true. There are countless people, throughout history, who have shaped the world around them through creativity; just think of all of the writers who have shaped language, philosophers who have shaped society, and artists who have shaped... well, whatever their art is centred on. Sure, in the current society, scientists and lawyers will be valued over teachers and authors, but it definitely has to be understood that every single subject, be it art, or medicine, has an integral part in society's function. Think of it this way: if a scientist has no creativity, they will never succeed, because they are unable to think outside of their pragmatic box.
    And if an artist doesn't study science then they too would be failures since they have squandered their creativity.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    It's been done now, get over it.

    Think of how you can use that degree to your advantage.
    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    ?

    you're not answering the question, you're dismissing it
    That was the realistic answer to your question. Worrying over how inferior your degree would do absolutely nothing to help. Do the best you can with what you have.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    That was the realistic answer to your question. Worrying over how inferior your degree would do absolutely nothing to help. Do the best you can with what you have.
    it doesn't matte whether it would help, it matters whether it is. Same as with my other thread ^^^

    It's a general trend I find, people denying certain uncomfortably harsh truths so that they don't drive themselves crazy. I think there are actual psychological defence mechanisms for this behaviour even

    example being: if someone leaves me for having not done a STEM, when they meet someone who did-well I can't complain about it if mine was the inferior choice to begin with. Just trying to understand how the world/people work.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Xenorebrem)
    And if an artist doesn't study science then they too would be failures since they have squandered their creativity.
    Good point, well made. I didn't consider that when writing my answer, since I was slightly biased towards showing that the arts/humanities aren't inferior. I suppose that there should be a balance in each subject.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Embla)
    This is definitely not true. There are countless people, throughout history, who have shaped the world around them through creativity; just think of all of the writers who have shaped language, philosophers who have shaped society, and artists who have shaped... well, whatever their art is centred on. Sure, in the current society, scientists and lawyers will be valued over teachers and authors, but it definitely has to be understood that every single subject, be it art, or medicine, has an integral part in society's function. Think of it this way: if a scientist has no creativity, they will never succeed, because they are unable to think outside of their pragmatic box.
    so you agree that STEM skill-sets are valued over all the rest?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Xenorebrem)
    And if an artist doesn't study science then they too would be failures since they have squandered their creativity.
    in the event you could only do one, which is superior?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    so you agree that STEM skill-sets are valued over all the rest?
    No, I'm saying that society values them above other subjects. Personally, I don't think that any one subject is inferior to another.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Embla)
    No, I'm saying that society values them above other subjects. Personally, I don't think that any one subject is inferior to another.
    you=part of Society

    since everyone who responds here=part of Society
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    in the event you could only do one, which is superior?
    Well creativity since then I could do Science ...:confused:
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    in the event you could only do one, which is superior?
    I doubt many people go into degrees thinking 'oh this will make me better than those humanities plebs'. I chose my degree because it's what I was interested in, and throughout my school life Id been absolutely abysmal at humanities-type subjects. I don't see any one as better than the other, it's just about going for what suits your strengths. I'm terrible at essays so I admire people who manage to do subjects that involves a lot of research and essays :yep:


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    it doesn't matte whether it would help, it matters whether it is. Same as with my other thread ^^^

    It's a general trend I find, people denying certain uncomfortably harsh truths so that they don't drive themselves crazy. I think there are actual psychological defence mechanisms for this behaviour even

    example being: if someone leaves me for having not done a STEM, when they meet someone who did-well I can't complain about it if mine was the inferior choice to begin with. Just trying to understand how the world/people work.
    Ok so what if your degree is inferior? How does pondering and depressing yourself because of that help you?

    In your example, it's extremely unlikely that someone would leave you just because someone else did a STEM degree and you didn't, seriously. Listen to yourself, that is not real life.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    you=part of Society

    since everyone who responds here=part of Society
    Yes, I'm a part of society, but that does not mean that I hold all of the same values and views that the general​ society holds.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    Ok so what if your degree is inferior? How does pondering and depressing yourself because of that help you?

    In your example, it's extremely unlikely that someone would leave you just because someone else did a STEM degree and you didn't, seriously. Listen to yourself, that is not real life.
    'so what' would be the next step of course, but the not knowing whether it is or not is just as bad as being told it is/isn't.

    I refer you back to Groot 'why do guys get upset…if 2 people both have great personalities and treat me well, but one has [X skill-set above the other, in her case aesthetics], of course I am going to be more attracted to [1 with superior skill-set], that's just the way it is'

    apply to [X degree]

    in the place I have been lurking non-STEM is a deal breaker aye. In my old work-place, my colleague frequently told me how only STEM grads are going to get jobs in the current climate, non-STEM has no value. Etc.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Embla)
    Yes, I'm a part of society, but that does not mean that I hold all of the same values and views that the general​ society holds.
    nope; however you are biased towards pandering my insecurities as first respondent to the question in favour. Did you do Arts/Humanities/Social Sciences yourself?
 
 
 
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.