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    Why do you have to drop an A-level after a year?
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    (Original post by Shumxn)
    Hi there, I'm going to start sixth form college soon and I've chosen the following options all A-Level, Law, History, English Language & Literature (Combined) and Business. The career I want to pursue is to becoming a Lawyer. I was wondering if these were all good for the career I want? I still have some time to change them however I was also wondering if English lang & lit (combined) is going to be too hard? & I have to drop an A-Level after a year at college, so which A-Level do you think I should drop? Thank you
    I have heard that a Law A-Level does not contribute positively (yet not negatively, it must be said) towards a Law degree, but haven't got the insight or experience to delve any further into the matter. I wonder what others think.

    As for the two English A Levels, I would say that they are complementary to each other. It'll still be tough doing both, but so will taking pretty much any pair of A-Levels.

    In terms of dropping an A Level, I have found that, unless one is sure as to which subject he or she will drop, it is best to wait until the end of the AS to determine which A Level to drop. Purely on instinct, though, I would say Business.

    Hope that helped.
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    (Original post by Shumxn)
    I'm not entirely sure to be honest, I'm very new to this since I'm going to leave year 11 soon and move onto sixth form college. All I know is we get 4 choices and then we have to drop one choice of course after a year. Therefore we're left with 3 courses.
    That's what's normally done, but you shouldn't have to. You can take 4 or 5 full A-levels if you want.
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    (Original post by Shumxn)
    Wow I honestly never knew that, quite surprised, guess I've been told that so it's more easier for me in college so I can concentrate on other A-Levels more. Thank you for letting me know, I'll think about considering this.
    Obviously only take that many to A2 if you are genuinely interested in all of the subjects, but I wanted to let you know it is an option to consider.
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    (Original post by Shumxn)
    Thank you very much, I really appreciate it for you taking your time for a very helpful response. I've got one question for you, what do you think about me choosing History A-Level?
    History A-Level is a highly regarded one. It would/will be very helpful in terms of analytic thinking for a Law degree, although I was never keen on the subject. Perhaps, there is someone on here who has taken history and is planning to do law...
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    (Original post by Shumxn)
    Wow I honestly never knew that, quite surprised, guess I've been told that so it's more easier for me in college so I can concentrate on other A-Levels more. Thank you for letting me know, I'll think about considering this.
    If you're up for it, then I would definitely go for 4, rather than 3. The standard offer from universities is to ask for given grades in 3 A-Levels, but if you're clever (which, since you want to do a Law degree, you must be) 4 A-Levels ensures that work load remains consistently high right through to university. I wouldn't advise taking 5 full A-Levels, but would encourage the idea of beginning with 5 AS subjects, and taking 4 of them forward to the full A-Level.
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    (Original post by SH0405)
    If your up for it, then I would definitely go for 4, rather than 3. The standard offer from universities is to ask for given grades in 3 A-Levels, but if you're clever (which, since you want to do a Law degree, you must be) 4 A-Levels ensures that work load remains consistently high right through to university. I wouldn't advise taking 5 full A-Levels, but would encourage the idea of beginning with 5 AS subjects, and taking 4 of them forward to the full A-Level.
    Sorry to burst your bubble but I would definitely not recommend doing 4/5 A Levels. I learnt the hard way. I did: History, Philosophy and Ethics AS, Maths, Music, Critical Thinking AS and an EPQ and there was no point. I have lots of knowledge now, yes, but universities don't care. They only look at your top 3 A2s and considering I took 5 A2s, I had less time to revise for each one meaning I could have gotten a better grade. Please dont make the same mistake as me. I suggest you do: Law, Business, History and English for AS, drop either Business or Law (because they aren't important for the job you want and unis love History and English Literature). I also recommend the EPQ if you can do it because it shows a range of skills to universities which they like.
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    (Original post by rileypa)
    Sorry to burst your bubble but I would definitely not recommend doing 4/5 A Levels. I learnt the hard way. I did: History, Philosophy and Ethics AS, Maths, Music, Critical Thinking AS and an EPQ and there was no point. I have lots of knowledge now, yes, but universities don't care. They only look at your top 3 A2s and considering I took 5 A2s, I had less time to revise for each one meaning I could have gotten a better grade. Please dont make the same mistake as me. I suggest you do: Law, Business, History and English for AS, drop either Business or Law (because they aren't important for the job you want and unis love History and English Literature). I also recommend the EPQ if you can do it because it shows a range of skills to universities which they like.
    This thread was, prior to your reply, inactive for 18 months. I'm now at university.
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    I've heard from numerous lecturers and lawyers alike that law A-Level sadly does **** all in terms of teaching you anything, they end up 'unteaching' it at uni because its so confused and wrong in terms of content. However, things such as history and English are great subjects for becoming a lawyer because they teach you about real-life debate and give you invaluable skills. I know this because I wanted to be a lawyer but I've since changed my mind, good luck!
 
 
 
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