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    Can someone possibly check that these details are correct?

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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
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    Not sure what the question is, is it multiple choice? - wrt the first graph in the second picture the operating temp of a light bulb filament is >2000K. off the top of my head I don't think anything very dramatic happens to its resistance between 0 and 200 celcius but if anything it would be getting higher with increasing temp.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Not sure what the question is, is it multiple choice? - wrt the first graph in the second picture the operating temp of a light bulb filament is >2000K. off the top of my head I don't think anything very dramatic happens to its resistance between 0 and 200 celcius but if anything it would be getting higher with increasing temp.
    Does the resistance increase(as the atoms have more energy so get in the way of the electrons) or decrease(because electrons have more energy) with increasing temperature?


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    (Original post by Mutleybm1996)
    Does the resistance increase(as the atoms have more energy so get in the way of the electrons) or decrease(because electrons have more energy) with increasing temperature?


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    Well in metals (i.e. tungsten in a bulb filament) the explanation is that it's the rising KE of the atoms is making it difficult for the electrons to move forward as the temp increases.

    in thermistors which are made of semiconductor, the rising KE of the atoms as the temp increases makes more free charge carriers available. This applies to -ve temperature coefficient thermistors which are the ones you usually meet in A level.

    it's a different process depending on the material the component is made of.
 
 
 
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