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So someone tried to scam me... watch

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    I'm looking to buy a car and I spotted a great deal for the kind of car I want to buy on a car trading website. I tried to phone the seller but I couldn't get through, so I sent them an email. I got a reply saying the car isn't in the UK at all, it's in Austria.

    Come again? I said, no thanks, for all I know the car doesn't exist, thanks for your time.

    But, they messaged me back and suggested using an escrow system and said they would cover the transport costs. They said, we'll use Amazon's Payments service to hold the money, they'll send the car to me, I have 7 days to see if I like it, and if I do then I release the money and the trade works out.

    That all seemed quite interesting. How could they scam me from that? I thought okay, I don't see how I could be scammed if we're using an escrow service provided by Amazon. I don't have anything to lose here unless it's some kind of phishing attack.

    However, as it turns out, Amazon Payments isn't an escrow service at all and, doing a quick Google search, this is in fact a phishing attack, and I'm expecting them to send me a dodgy URL any time.

    I don't like the idea of nasty people like this out there trying to steal people's money. If I can make their day a bit more difficult I think that's for the best. I want ideas on how to most effectively waste their time and foil their scamming efforts.

    TL;DR: Someone tried to scam me out of £4,500, I want to foil their scamming efforts by wasting their time. Please post ideas below.
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    Aha Miser I love it! "You want to foil their efforts by wasting their time" :lol:

    Erm, not much of an expert but let's see, how about asking for more pics of the car maybe? (Seeing as it 'doesn't exist' they've got a job on their hands) I personally get really annoyed when online customers ask me for more pics seeing as I've done my best to provide good ones already!

    Ask them to scan over/send some car documents like service history etc? I dunno lol just ask for petty little details and be repetitive with it all. Prolong stuff! Good luck with the plan
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    (Original post by Lyrical Prodigy)
    Aha Miser I love it! "You want to foil their efforts by wasting their time" :lol:

    Erm, not much of an expert but let's see, how about asking for more pics of the car maybe? (Seeing as it 'doesn't exist' they've got a job on their hands) I personally get really annoyed when online customers ask me for more pics seeing as I've done my best to provide good ones already!

    Ask them to scan over/send some car documents like service history etc? I dunno lol just ask for petty little details and be repetitive with it all. Prolong stuff! Good luck with the plan
    Yep, those are some great ideas! I thought about asking them for more pictures too.

    Another one I thought of was to, when I get the link, say it didn't seem to work properly, so I will email Amazon support when I get home. That'll really make them squirm. See how fast they can email back with an excuse as to why I shouldn't do that.

    The sweet spot I think is stuff that they can actually do, so asking for the service records might be tricky. I'll start off small and work up.
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    Ask for a ''seller rating'' and ''customer feedback comments''?
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    (Original post by Nirgilis)
    Ask for a ''seller rating'' and ''customer feedback comments''?
    They're posing as a private seller so they wouldn't usually have that. Keep the ideas coming though. :yy:
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    Ask if they'll sell you just certain parts of the car instead of it as a whole
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    Well done for spotting the scam miser. Even if the car exists it is probably stolen or damaged.
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    Say you would like a box of Austrian chocolates in the glove box as a good will gesture
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    Request a handwritten sonnet about the beauty of the car to be delivered by mail beforehand, so as for you to get more excited about your approaching purchase.
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    (Original post by miser)
    Yep, those are some great ideas! I thought about asking them for more pictures too.

    Another one I thought of was to, when I get the link, say it didn't seem to work properly, so I will email Amazon support when I get home. That'll really make them squirm. See how fast they can email back with an excuse as to why I shouldn't do that.

    The sweet spot I think is stuff that they can actually do, so asking for the service records might be tricky. I'll start off small and work up.
    Ahh I see, good job on identifying it by the way!

    Also, you could ask them for the seat measurements, like as them the length and width in cm etc you need to know for 'special reasons' or something.

    :mmm:
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    (Original post by miser)
    I'm looking to buy a car and I spotted a great deal for the kind of car I want to buy on a car trading website. I tried to phone the seller but I couldn't get through, so I sent them an email. I got a reply saying the car isn't in the UK at all, it's in Austria.

    Come again? I said, no thanks, for all I know the car doesn't exist, thanks for your time.

    But, they messaged me back and suggested using an escrow system and said they would cover the transport costs. They said, we'll use Amazon's Payments service to hold the money, they'll send the car to me, I have 7 days to see if I like it, and if I do then I release the money and the trade works out.

    That all seemed quite interesting. How could they scam me from that? I thought okay, I don't see how I could be scammed if we're using an escrow service provided by Amazon. I don't have anything to lose here unless it's some kind of phishing attack.

    However, as it turns out, Amazon Payments isn't an escrow service at all and, doing a quick Google search, this is in fact a phishing attack, and I'm expecting them to send me a dodgy URL any time.

    I don't like the idea of nasty people like this out there trying to steal people's money. If I can make their day a bit more difficult I think that's for the best. I want ideas on how to most effectively waste their time and foil their scamming efforts.

    TL;DR: Someone tried to scam me out of £4,500, I want to foil their scamming efforts by wasting their time. Please post ideas below.
    Say that your uncle is in Austria, and wants to come & view the car before you send the payment. Ask for an address
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    (Original post by FrostyLemon)
    Say you would like a box of Austrian chocolates in the glove box as a good will gesture
    Ahahaha, love this one.
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    (Original post by SA-1)
    Say that your uncle is in Australia, and wants to come & view the car before you send the payment. Ask for an address
    Sorry to inform but Austria and Australia are two very different countries indeed.
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    (Original post by parry_93)
    Sorry to inform but Austria and Australia are two very different countries indeed.
    Ha. Alright smarty pants, I just read it wrong. Just woke up soo.. You know
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    (Original post by miser)
    I'm looking to buy a car and I spotted a great deal for the kind of car I want to buy on a car trading website. I tried to phone the seller but I couldn't get through, so I sent them an email. I got a reply saying the car isn't in the UK at all, it's in Austria.

    Come again? I said, no thanks, for all I know the car doesn't exist, thanks for your time.

    But, they messaged me back and suggested using an escrow system and said they would cover the transport costs. They said, we'll use Amazon's Payments service to hold the money, they'll send the car to me, I have 7 days to see if I like it, and if I do then I release the money and the trade works out.

    That all seemed quite interesting. How could they scam me from that? I thought okay, I don't see how I could be scammed if we're using an escrow service provided by Amazon. I don't have anything to lose here unless it's some kind of phishing attack.

    However, as it turns out, Amazon Payments isn't an escrow service at all and, doing a quick Google search, this is in fact a phishing attack, and I'm expecting them to send me a dodgy URL any time.

    I don't like the idea of nasty people like this out there trying to steal people's money. If I can make their day a bit more difficult I think that's for the best. I want ideas on how to most effectively waste their time and foil their scamming efforts.

    TL;DR: Someone tried to scam me out of £4,500, I want to foil their scamming efforts by wasting their time. Please post ideas below.
    After you've asked them for photos, tell them you're flying soon to Munich on business. Ask them if it would be okay to come and inspect the car while you're there on your trip, and if they can help you to find the best deals on flights from Munich.

    EDIT: Ah, someone else had the same idea.

    Ask if he has space to accommodate you for a night while you are in Austria. Tell him you'll pay him a small advance in exchange for his hospitality, and that all you need are his bank name, bank account number, bank account name, IBAN, sort code, and SWIFT code.
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    ask him you want to meet him, give him address somewhere in cornwall or aberdeen
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    Ask for the detailed specs on every component of the car. Ask how they would feel about repainting the car for an additional cost.
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    Tell them, that before you go any further, you want them to send you a picture of the car with a piece of paper on the dash that reads TSR!
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    Ask them how much it would cost to convert it for legally registering and insuring it in the UK. You'll need a full specification of necessary work and costings of course, one componant at a time. And if they bother doing that, start asking them detailed technical-type questions about each piece of work or modification.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Ask them how much it would cost to convert it for legally registering and insuring it in the UK. You'll need a full specification of necessary work and costings of course, one componant at a time. And if they bother doing that, start asking them detailed technical-type questions about each piece of work or modification.
    It's a UK-registered car, just it happens to currently be in Austria. Nice idea though.
 
 
 
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