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    Teenage drinking has become one of the largest social issues among young people in England. Although three quarters of secondary school pupils drink on a regular basis, the problem is that they are not aware how dangerous it could actually be. The reality is that alcohol is often that causes many problems. Alcohol destroys many young peoples lives, and is now one of the most serious problems young people will face. Drunk driving is one of the largest problem often linked with teenage drinking. Alcohol dulls parts of the brain that are crucial when decision making, it decrease the ability to concentrate, and slow reaction time behind the wheel. Drunk drives are treacherous on the roads and could easily hurt them selves or someone innocent. Another problem with under aged drinking is that you may loose control of your actions. Alcohol abuse is extremely harmful to ones body, either directly or indirectly to teenagers. Unfortually, drinkers often do not think about what effect alcohol will have on them when they get older; so many people end up learning the hard way. Teenagers that abuse alcohol often develop problems with their liver, heart, stomach and kidneys. would you drink alcohol if you knew the circumstances?

    Drinking can make teenagers feel great but that only lasts a short period of time. Teenagers get drunk on a regular basis. Alcohol clouds your brain and hinders your ability to make decisions. Too much drinking literally makes your brain shrink and can cause serious damage. Binge drinking can cause learning disability and damage your memory. Alcohol will give you more energy, but alcohol isn’t an energy drink; its depressant. In secondary school, friends start pressuring us to drink. Secondary schools students see alcohol as glamorous and a way to become popular. Once you drink a couple of times you get addicted, once your addicted its very hard to stop. Drinking can cause cancer and could even lead to death.
    Some people believe we should have the right to do whatever we want. Some believe that people under the age of 17 are not responsible enough to handle the effects alcohol has on our body. The one thing that both sides agree on is that people will drink alcohol no matter what the law is because they can get alcohol very easy. They can go through their parents cabinets to find alcohol. Also they can ask older friend to purchase it for them from shops. Although there are some shop that don’t ask for id and sell alcohol under the age of 18.

    When young people drink and get into a car, they also intend to make poor decision that bear on their safety. For example, young people who have been drinking are less likely to wear a seat belt. In alcohol related traffic there where three times more deaths among young people who were not wearing seat belts than among those who were wearing them.
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    (Original post by haroon123)
    Teenage drinking has become one of the largest social issues among young people in England. Although three quarters of secondary school pupils drink on a regular basis, the problem is that they are not aware how dangerous it could actually be. The reality is that alcohol is often that causes many problems. Alcohol destroys many young peoples lives, and is now one of the most serious problems young people will face. Drunk driving is one of the largest problem often linked with teenage drinking. Alcohol dulls parts of the brain that are crucial when decision making, it decrease the ability to concentrate, and slow reaction time behind the wheel. Drunk drives are treacherous on the roads and could easily hurt them selves or someone innocent. Another problem with under aged drinking is that you may loose control of your actions. Alcohol abuse is extremely harmful to ones body, either directly or indirectly to teenagers. Unfortually, drinkers often do not think about what effect alcohol will have on them when they get older; so many people end up learning the hard way. Teenagers that abuse alcohol often develop problems with their liver, heart, stomach and kidneys. would you drink alcohol if you knew the circumstances?

    Drinking can make teenagers feel great but that only lasts a short period of time. Teenagers get drunk on a regular basis. Alcohol clouds your brain and hinders your ability to make decisions. Too much drinking literally makes your brain shrink and can cause serious damage. Binge drinking can cause learning disability and damage your memory. Alcohol will give you more energy, but alcohol isn’t an energy drink; its depressant. In secondary school, friends start pressuring us to drink. Secondary schools students see alcohol as glamorous and a way to become popular. Once you drink a couple of times you get addicted, once your addicted its very hard to stop. Drinking can cause cancer and could even lead to death.
    Some people believe we should have the right to do whatever we want. Some believe that people under the age of 17 are not responsible enough to handle the effects alcohol has on our body. The one thing that both sides agree on is that people will drink alcohol no matter what the law is because they can get alcohol very easy. They can go through their parents cabinets to find alcohol. Also they can ask older friend to purchase it for them from shops. Although there are some shop that don’t ask for id and sell alcohol under the age of 18.

    When young people drink and get into a car, they also intend to make poor decision that bear on their safety. For example, young people who have been drinking are less likely to wear a seat belt. In alcohol related traffic there where three times more deaths among young people who were not wearing seat belts than among those who were wearing them.
    Based on the way students drink at University this seems to be a ridiculous statement I would say people seem to be maturer about alcohol when they are younger or at least just as immature with loads of binge drinking(drinking seems to really start in adolescence and get worse and worse until they become mature adults) and there are bigger risks to older drinking like drink driving.A lot of the problems involved with drink involve drink driving so it would be a good idea to raise the driving age to a sensible age like 25 given that accidents involving young people are higher than other age groups.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    Based on the way students drink at University this seems to be a ridiculous statement I would say people seem to be maturer about alcohol when they are younger or at least just as immature
    Really? From what I've seen, young people are by far the worst for binge drinking. People tend to slow down with alcohol as they get older - hangovers come easier, and are worse than they used to be. People generally become more health-conscious as they get older (perhaps due to a realisation that their constant partying and binge drinking during their adolescence might not have been great for their body). People have less time to get drunk constantly because they have more important matters to deal with, like work and family.

    When you take a step back and examine it, the way students drink at uni is absolutely mental. Getting hammered every weekend, going on two, three, maybe even four day benders, drinking extremely strong drinks like vodka, whisky, cocktails etc. That kind of drinking is extremely irresponsible, and they know it. I don't know any mature adult who drinks like that. If that's the kind of drinking somebody is doing, it's likely that they haven't quite got their priorities straight.

    Legalising alcohol consumption for under-18s would be pointless. All it would do is encourage irresponsible behaviour. The teenagers who want to drink underage will do it anyway, and the ones who wouldn't normally do it will just have the option presented to them with no consequences.

    Maybe I'm just pessimistic but I really don't think much can be done about binge-drinking in Britain, outside of making alcohol absurdly expensive (which I do not support). You can 'educate' people as to the dangers of alcohol, all the negative effects, potential consequences, peer pressure etc. - but guess what - they won't listen. They'll still do it. We live in a culture that encourages over-consumption of alcohol, and markets it as the only way to have fun, the only thing to do at the weekend. The attitude towards alcohol in this country will probably never change, especially among students and young people.
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    (Original post by Crabbages)
    Really? From what I've seen, young people are by far the worst for binge drinking. People tend to slow down with alcohol as they get older - hangovers come easier, and are worse than they used to be. People generally become more health-conscious as they get older (perhaps due to a realisation that their constant partying and binge drinking during their adolescence might not have been great for their body). People have less time to get drunk constantly because they have more important matters to deal with, like work and family.

    When you take a step back and examine it, the way students drink at uni is absolutely mental. Getting hammered every weekend, going on two, three, maybe even four day benders, drinking extremely strong drinks like vodka, whisky, cocktails etc. That kind of drinking is extremely irresponsible, and they know it. I don't know any mature adult who drinks like that. If that's the kind of drinking somebody is doing, it's likely that they haven't quite got their priorities straight.

    Legalising alcohol consumption for under-18s would be pointless. All it would do is encourage irresponsible behaviour. The teenagers who want to drink underage will do it anyway, and the ones who wouldn't normally do it will just have the option presented to them with no consequences.

    Maybe I'm just pessimistic but I really don't think much can be done about binge-drinking in Britain, outside of making alcohol absurdly expensive (which I do not support). You can 'educate' people as to the dangers of alcohol, all the negative effects, potential consequences, peer pressure etc. - but guess what - they won't listen. They'll still do it. We live in a culture that encourages over-consumption of alcohol, and markets it as the only way to have fun, the only thing to do at the weekend. The attitude towards alcohol in this country will probably never change, especially among students and young people.
    I said that they get more immature in regards to alcohol until they become mature adults its clear that their attitude to alcohol gets worse and worse from the start of adolescence onto university and then they start getting maturer.It is obvious to see at much younger ages the typical 10 year old will not drink as much as the typical 15 year old despite it being illegal and thus just about as available to both groups.
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    people should be able to drink beer in pubs at 14. It would promote responsible drinking.
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    Well Americans got that law, you need to be over 21 to legaly consume alcohol cause the brain keeps evolving until you are approximately 21. They ain't as naive as I thought.
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    all i was asking is that i'm doing an essay for school and do you think what i have written is any good.
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    TL;DR

    Let young people drink responsibly from a younger age as we see on the continent.
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    (Original post by haroon123)
    should under age drink be allowed?
    I'm still struggling with the thread title. I hope it's not your essay title.

    (a) If it were allowed, it wouldn't be underage drinking. Do you mean "Should the age for buying alcohol be reduced?" ?

    (b) Alcohol can already be consumed by people aged 5 up at home.

    (c) Alcohol can be consumed with a meal on licensed premises (e.g. pub or restaurant) from age 16 upwards, provided the buyer is at least 18.

    Did you mean "Should drinking under the age of 5 be allowed?" I bet you didn't!


    So, "under-age drinking" in the way you possibly mean it is already allowed.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    people should be able to drink beer in pubs at 14. It would promote responsible drinking.
    Yeah, like my housemate had never drunk before he was 18 and he went to uni at 18 and drank loads over the summer. Whereas I at least started when I was 15/16.
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    (Original post by haroon123)
    <essay words>
    Your essay seems to be about "drinking and driving is stupid" which does not match the title. But that is already illegal.

    What is the argument you are trying to make?
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    TL;DR

    Let young people drink responsibly from a younger age as we see on the continent.
    so 5 is still too old ?


    please go and do some research on the law ...
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    (Original post by Simes)
    I'm still struggling with the thread title. I hope it's not your essay title.

    (a) If it were allowed, it wouldn't be underage drinking. Do you mean "Should the age for buying alcohol be reduced?" ?

    (b) Alcohol can already be consumed by people aged 5 up at home.

    (c) Alcohol can be consumed with a meal on licensed premises (e.g. pub or restaurant) from age 16 upwards, provided the buyer is at least 18.

    Did you mean "Should drinking under the age of 5 be allowed?" I bet you didn't!


    So, "under-age drinking" in the way you possibly mean it is already allowed.
    I suspect the OP didn;t do they basic research , it is amazing how many people don;t know the significance of 5 and 16 when it comes to actually Drinking alcoholic drinks ratherthan purchasing them.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    so 5 is still too old ?


    please go and do some research on the law ...
    Let them drink outside their own home in somewhere like a pub, as we see on the continent.

    I thought it being outside their home was implied in the context of the conversation.
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    Better having them drink in the pub than the park after dark...


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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    I suspect the OP didn;t do they basic research , it is amazing how many people don;t know the significance of 5 and 16 when it comes to actually Drinking alcoholic drinks ratherthan purchasing them.
    Assuming we are talking about the laws for England and Wales where from 16 you may be a drink with a meal when accompanied by an adult in a pub.
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    If you think about it though, do we really want a group of 14 year olds drinking in a pub? It would certainly be a put off for me


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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    it is amazing how many people don't know the significance of 5 and 16 when it comes to actually drinking alcoholic drinks rather than purchasing them.
    I think that's because the NHS and the anti-drinking lobby want people to forget.

    I was introduced to alcohol slowly from quite young: a glass of wine with roast dinner on a Sunday, a glass or two of beer or lager at weddings.

    A couple of times on Scout camp the Assistant Scout Leader bought a couple of cans of lager for each of us Patrol Leaders we sat round the campfire telling silly stories and dirty jokes while the rest of the kids were tucked up in the tents (also telling silly stories and dirty jokes!). Asking him about it years later he said it was intentional, that he saw it as part of his responsibility to introduce us to how to be a bunch of blokes drinking responsibly. He did swear us to secrecy at the time; I dread to think what would happen if any Scout leader did that now!

    I think that the slower introduction when younger is better than alcohol poisoning and a stomach-pump at 18 or 19 or 20. And there is nothing much in UK law to prevent it.
 
 
 
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